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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 13, 1957 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-11-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN~ DAILY

-ence Discusses
gas Vacation Trips

Music, Speech Departments Present.
Operas as Student Training Program

CONSIDERS WILDLIFE:
Conservation Protects
Deer Herds and Hunter

Re-evalu
Phdoop

in international #tu-
ration in the travel
he topic of the Eighth
al Student Travel
tatives from the travel
17 National Unions of
yet in Rome, Italy dur-
week in October.
ing the progress of the
it was estimated that
) students were assisted
e joint efforts of the
Unions of Students.
ons help plan more
vacation travel for
itudy Flights
sibility of renewing
tic student charter
.ing ;onsidered. Nego-
a the International Air
Association are being
sent there are several
ilable during holiday
opean student charter
ards, designed to show-
ig student's eligibility'
eductions and similar
ovided for students in
s he visits, are anoth-
>f the Student Travel
Over 154,'00 Interna-
nt Identity cards were
3r.
.ssed was the annual
on . Student Travel.
ook lists student hos-
'ants and gives infor-
the student traveler
ities in over 30 coun-
uss Insurance
insurance plan, stu-
luctions and the func-
tudent travel bureaus
iscussed extensively.

This Student Travel Conference
was held under the auspices of the
International Student Conference.
National Unions of Student travel
bureaus represented at Rome
were: Austria, Denmark, England,
Wales and Northern Ireland, Fin-
land, France, Germany Israel,
Italy, Malta, Netherlands, Norway,
Scotland, Sweden, Switzerland,
Turkey, United States and Yugo-
slavia. National student organiza-
tions from Poland and Spain were
also represented.
Attends Conference
A member of the Research and
informations commissions of Na-
tional Union of Students, Juan
Barros of Chile, attended a Con-
gress in Paris, France. Held. on
the first anniversary of the Hun-
garian revolution, the conference
was attended by representatives
of the7,000 Hungarian students
who fled.
Students discussed problems of
Hungarianl refugee students In the
13 different countries in which
they are resuming their 'studies,
the principles of the revolution
and the current situation in Hun-
gary. Several National Unions of
Students sent observers to the
Congress, including the United
States.
Holds Seminar
. The German National Union of
Students (VDS) held a seminar
on problems of students from
"growth p o t e n t i a 1" countries
studying in West Germany.
International affairs officers
from the local student councils
throughout German participated
in the seminar.

By DIANE FRASER
Music, costumes, scenery, the
excitement of stage production-
these combined with the efforts of
both the music school and the
speech. department will produce
the two opera productions for the
current school year.
This semester's opera courses
offered by both the music school
and the speech department will

Josef Blatt, of the -music school,
explained.
Stresses Importance
As director of opera production,
Prof. Blatt stressed the importance
of the experience and training stu-
dents receive in these productions
as opera is the major outlet for the
vocal profession. "You can't teach
opera in a vacuum - you must
really teach the students what to
do," he said. -
Music school students make up
the cast and orchestra for these
productions while the speech de-
partment takes complete charge
of the staging and costumes. The
physicaleducation department of-
ten helps with the ballet in the
productions.
Prof. Blatt, who directs the
whole program, chooses the operas
and the casts, Prof. Hugh Z. Nor-
ton, of the speech department, will
be in charge of the stage direction.
Organizes Department
Pr-of. Blatt came to the Univer-
sity' in the summer of 1952 to
organize and direct the new opera
department of the, music school.
Prior to the organization of the
opera department, the opera pro-
ductions were done on a less regu-
lar basis, he said.
"Gianni Schicchi" will be given
as a Christmas candle-light serv-
ice in the afternoon by the music
school with some technical help
from the speech department. Pre-
ceding the performance, 16th Cen-
tury "Brass Chorals" by Giovanni
Gabrieli will be played from the
organ loft.
"Because this is a short after-
noon opera and we just want to
make something very festive and
intimate, there will be no admis-'
sion charged;" Prof. Blatt ex-
plained.
The annual opera done on the

speech department playbill by the
combined speech department and
music school will be "Masked Ball."
"I don't think this was ever given
here so it will be a premiere per-
formance in Ann Arbor," the "opera
director 'said.
Each year, the music school pre-
sents one or more evenings of
scenes from operas. This is done in
an auditorium without scenery or
costumes. None are planned for
this semester because of the pro-
duction of "Gianni Schicchi."
In the past, an evening of these
opera scenes have replaced one
of the productions of a complete
opera.
The speech department is
financing the production of "Mask-
ed Ball." Receipts from the admis-
sion charge will go to the speech
department to help defray the
expenses.
.r'
"law Review'
Studies U.S.
Patent Rights
The current Michigan Law Re-
view outlines the views of Marcus
B. Finnegan and Richard W. Pogue
of the Patents Division, United
States Army, concerning model
legislation to protect inventions
made by government employees.
The authors citicize the absence
of an organized group to protect
the patent rights of government
scientists. They warn that this will
place the government at a contin-
uing disadvantage in competing
wih private industry for scientific
talent.

Michigan is using the "best
scientific methods" in the field of
conservation to protect both deer
and hunter," Prof. Warren Chase,
chairman of the Department of
Wildlife Management, said re-
cently.
Prof. Chase noted that the state
"has been dynamic in managing
its deer herd, always one of the
largest, from the beginning of its
history."
Adding that "the Game Division
has been forthright in trying to
balance the numbers of deer with
[_organization_
.notices
(Use of this column for announce-
ments of meetings is available to of-
ficiallyrrecognized and registered stu-
dent organizations only.)
Senior Board, January graduation
announcement orders taken. Nov. 13-20,
12 noon-5:00 p.m., SAB.
* *
ASCE, meeting, Nov. 13, 7:30 pm., 3rd
floor Conference Room, Unton. Speak-
er: Mr. Robert Guise, "Beneficiating
of. Aggregate for Better Concrete."
Physics Club, meeting, Nov. 13, 7:30
p.m., 2032 Randall Lab. Speaker: Tom
Stark, "Phenomenological Theory of
Semi-Conductors."
Sigma Alpha Eta, meeting, Nov. 14,
7 415 p.m., Speech Clinic. Speaker: 13r.
.Morley.
Junior Girls' Play, Central Com.
meeting, Nov. 13, 7:15 p.m., League.
Chess Club, meeting, Nov. 13, 7:30
p.m., Union.
* * *.
Hillel Players, mass meeting with
Ann Arbor Dramatic workshop, Nov. 14,
8:00 p.m., Hillel.
Mechanical Engineers Club, meeting,
Nov. 13. 7:30 p.m., 3-RS Union. Speak-
er: Mr. D. N. Buel, "~Problems Faced by
the Missile Industry."
Student National Education Assn.,
meeting, Nov. 13, 7:30 p.m., Ed. School
Cafeteria. Topic: "Education of the,
Gifted Child - Integration or Segre-
gation."

wI

i

the food available so that the re-
source can be used and not lost
through starvation," the Univer-
sity conservationist observed that
conservation practices have
changed with the years.
Originally, he said, southern
Michigan's deer herd was larger
than the Upper Peninsula herd.
As the forests vanished to be re-
placed with farms, deer persisted
in quantity only in the north.
Killing deer for meat and hides
became profitable, Prof. Chase
noted, but in 1880 shipping rec-
ords show 100,000 deer on the
market and people feared the deer
might face extinction.
In 1881, Prof. Chase said, the
first deer management regulations
were formulated. Since that time,
he added, the bag limit has been
reduced to one deer a season and
the season has been cut to a few
months each fall.

The Philosophy Club is c
posed of faculty members
graduate students as well as p
osophy majors.
"The purpose of the organ
tion is to discuss philosoph
problems and give people an
portunity to read papers and Y
them discussed," Helen Benk
'5, president of the club said,
also gives the members an opI
tunit~y to meet the faculty and
acquainted with others in
Philosophy t)partment."
Members volunteer to write
pers for the group to discuss c
read some work they have
viously written. Guest spea
also present talks to the gr
or read papers to them.
At the meetings, questions-
raised and an informal discus
is carried on at the conclusioi
each topic.

Class of '60 Presents

-DIily-Fred Shippey
JOSEF BLATT
...r directs operas

culminate in the production of
Puccini's comic one-act opera
"Gianni Schicchi" on Dec. 18 and
19. Next semester's production will
be Verdi's "Masked Ball" on Feb.
26-28 and(March 1.
"The opera productions have.Jtwo
parallel purposes-the training of
students as well as a community
service for both the Ann Arbor
and student communities," Prof.

"GIRL CRZY"
Soph Show of '57
Nov. 14, 15, 16 at 8:00 P.M.

,*

All Tickets $1.50

DAILY

OFFICIAL

BULLETIN

Tickets on sale daily from 10 till S
at Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
or call NO 8-6300

.nued from Page 4)
irds are available to any
ie United States who has
l'ability and special apti-
anced training in the zM-
atlons must be received by
en by Jan. 3, 1958. Pre-
ication cards and further
may be obtained in the
e Graduate School or by
e F'ellowhip Office, Na-
my. of - Sciences, National
uncil, 2101 Constitution
'ashington 25, D.C.
ectures
embly, today at 4 p.m. In
ture Hall. Harold M. D6rr,
e-wide education, director
er Session and professor of

political science, will speak on "State-
Wide Education." Under the auspices of
the Department of Speech, the speech
assembly is open to the public with no
admission charge.*
"The Rivalry" tomorrow night. Ray-
mond Massey, Agnes Moorehead and
Martin Gabel, stars of stage and screen,
will co-star in the new stage play "The
Rivalry" tomorrow, 8:30 p.m., in Hill
Auditorium. Tickets are now on sale
at the kuditorium box office.
Academic Notices
Faculty, College of Literature, Sci-
ence and the Arts:'Midsemester reports
are due Wed., Nov. 13, for those su-
dents whose standing at Aidsemester
is "D" or .E,.
Report cards 'have been distributed to
all departmental offices.. Green cards
are provided for reporting freshmen
and sophomores and white cards for
juniors and seniors. The reports for
freshmen and sophomores should be
sent to the Freshman-Sophomore
Counselors Office, 1210 Angell Hall;
those for juniors and seniors to the
Junior-Senior Counselors Office, 1213
Angell .,Hall.
Students not registered in this col-
lege but, who elected L.S.&A. courses
should be reported to the school or
college in which they are registered.
Additional cards. may be obtained in
1210 Angell Hall or 1213 Angell Hall.
Students, College of Engineering: The
final day for dropping courses without
record will be Wed., Nov. i3 A course
May be dropped only with the permis-
sion of the classifier after conference
with the instructor.
Students, College of Engineering: The
final . day for removal of incompletes
will. be Wed., Nov. 13. Petitions for ex-
tension of time must be on file in the
Secretary's office on or before Wed.,'
Nov. 13.

IF

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isms of Vision Inferred from Psycho- Co., Hartford, Conn. -- Feb. graduates
physical Measurements." /--men with bA or MA in LS&A or Bus
Ad for Management Training, which in-'
Physical Therapy ; Meeting, Thurs., cludes Administration, Underwriting,
Novh 14,l :15 p. Room 1142,. Main Claim Examiners, Field Supervisors,
Bu7lding, University Hospitl. This is Field Service, and Personnel and Plan-.
an important meeting for all juhiors ning Assistants. The company also
oncentrating in Physifalo Therapy and needs technical and professional men
onentating inPhlysical Theraspyn and to work as Lawyers, Doctors, Actuaries,
expecting to apply for admission to the Statisticians, Security Analysts, Ac-
rofessional programi of the senior year. countants, and men for Sales and Sales
Management. The company is among
Applied Mathematics Seminar. Thurs., the too 15 insurance companies in the
Nov. 14, at 4 p.m. in Room 246, West U.. in size.
Engineering Building. Dr. David ,S.y
Tues., Nov. 19
Greenstein will speak on '"Stabilitl Kordite Co., Div. of. Textron Inc.,
harts for the Numerical Solution or Macedon, New York - men in LS&A
Ordinary Differential Equations." Re- and Bus Ad for Marketing Management,
freshmenta in 274 W. Engineering at ,Product or Brand Management, Indus-
:30 P.M. trial Sales, Sales, Staff Administration,
Company is a leading extruder of poly-
401 Interdisciplinary Seminar on the theylene film products, manufacturing
application of Mathematics to Social plastic products which are used in all
Science, Room 3217, Angell Hall, Thurs., forms of consumer resale products and
:30-5:00 p.m., Nov. 14. E.L. Walker, industrial packaging:
John Holfand, Department of Psychol-i
;y. "Modelling of Nervous Systems on U.S. Dept. of Labor, Office of Person-
Domputers." nel Administration, Washington, D.C.--
men and women with degrees in So-
Doctoral Examination for Shashanka cial Science, especially Economics, for
3hekhar Mitra, Physics; thesis: "The work in any bureau of the Dept. of
:nfrared and Raman Spectra of Brucite, Labor. Entrance to the department can
Ag (OH)-2", Thurs., Nov. 14, 2046 Ran- be gained through the, Federal Service
iall Laboratory, at 3:10 p.m. Chairman, Entrance Exam and the Management
. W. Peters. Intern Program.
Canada Life Assurance Co., Jackson,
FOREIGN VISITORS Mich. - men with degrees in LS&A or
The following foreign visitors will be Bus Ad for Sales. Company is 110 years
mn the campus this week on the dates old and has about three billion dollars
ndicated. Program arrangements are of business in force. It has offices in
eing made by the International Cen- U.S. and Canada.

has a formal three-year training pro-
gram combined with a salary and a
bonus arrangement.
The Kroger Company, Detroit, Mich-
igan. Graduates - February, June,
August. Location of Work-29 states in
Midwest. Kroger is the 2nd largest food
retailing chain, also a large manufac-
turing organization. Men with BA in
Liberal Arts for Retailing, Real Estate,
Personnel, Warehousing and Transpor-
tation, Economics and Marketing. Men
with BBA or MBA for Retailing, Ac-
counting, Real Estate, Personnel, Ware-
housing and Transportation, Economics
'and Marketing.
For appointments with any of the
above contact the Bureau of Appoint-
ments, 3528 Admin. Bldg., ext. 3371.
Summer Placement:
Mr. Morton Goldman of Camp Ta-
kajo for Boys, Naples, Me., will be on
campus on Fri., Nov. 15, to interview
undergraduates, graduates and faculty
members for summer positions as gen-
eral counselors, and counselors in wat-
erfront, canoeing, tennis, golf, archery,
fencing, pioneering, and music and sci-
ence.
For further information contact Mr.
Ward Peterson, Bureau of Appoint-
ments, 3528 Admin. Bldg., ext. 3371.
Civil Service:
Civil Service of Canada announces a
career examination open to graduates
and to undergraduate obtaining degrees
in 1958, British subjects who have re-
sided in Canada for at least ten years.
The exam offers opportunities for em-
ployment to Customs Excise Headquar-
ters Trainees, Economists, Finance Of-
ficers, Foreign Service Officers for Citi-
zenship and Immigration, Foreign Serv-
ice Officers for External Affairs, For-
eign Service Officers for Foreign Trade
Service, Junior Administrative Officers,
Personnel Officers, Statisticians and
Trade and Commerce Officers. Tte
exam will be given on Saturday, Nov.
23. Further information and applica-
tions are available at the Bureau of
Appointments, 3528 Admin., Bldg., ext.
3371.

REFERENCE

I"

s

I'

I

All Subjects

Thousands at 9

and up

ter: Mrs. Miller.j
Mr. Jose Alemad Garcia, Director,
Dept. of Literature, Univ. of San Carlo,
Guatemala, Nov. 16-18.
Mr. Sachin Chadhuri, Editor, Econ-
omic Weekly, Bombay, India, Nov.
11-13.
Mr. Henrich W. A. L. Loevendfe and
Mrs. Loevendie, Secy. of the Curators,
Catholic Univ. for Social & Econ. Sci.,
of Tilburg. Secy. of the Curators, Dutch
Inst. of Catholic Courses for Teacher
Diplomas, Secy. and Delegate for Board
of Institute for Applied Psychology for
Tilburg and Nijinegen Universities,
Holland, Nov. 11-16.

John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance
Company, Toledo, Ohio. Graduates -
February, June, August. Location of
work - State of Ohio. Established in
1862. Fourth largest life insurance com-
pany in North America with insurance
in force well over eighteen billion and
with assets well in excess of four bil-
lion. Men with BA in Liberal Arts for
Sales. Men with BBA for Marketing,
Accounting, Advertising. Men with 1 or
2 years of law for Sales. John Hancock.~

N
N

S

ULRICH'S BOOKSTORE'grA
Opposite Engine6ering Arch

- ekend

. .._

onderland
AT LOW
STUDENTD
RATES
vaits you at any of these
TON-STATLER
HOT ELS
EW YORK CITYiS
The Statler
The Savoy-Plaza
he Waldorf-4storia
The Plaza.
LSHINGTON, D. C.:
The Statler
BUFFAL Ot
The ,Statler
BOSTON:
The Statler

Seminar, Dept.of Anatomy. Coffee Placement Notices
will be served one-half hour before in Personnel Requests:
Rm. 3502, East Medical Building, Wed., Representatives from the following
Nov. 13, 11:00 a.m. Dr. Richard Black- will be at the Bureau of Appointments:
well, Departments of Psychology and Mon., Nov. 18
Opthalmology: "Functional Mechan- Connecticut General Life Insurance
1 COUPON COUPON COUPON1
---- ---- -- - ------I O c
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NAT/ONAL EDIF/CES,
CASTLES,AND ESTATES

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