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November 06, 1957 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-11-06

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THE MICHIGAN'DAILY

J WEEK:

i Dancers Present Show

Dancers

of
as
la-)

otf

* Hill Audi-
s of India.
on will be
I including
Tresses and
ilment by
premiere
by London
Fonteyn of
seen alone
wn as Mo-
a feminine
.lrty years
f indecent
original.

'Old Lace'
To Headline
New Season
Joseph Kesselring's farce com-
edy "Arsenic and Old Lace" will
open the 1957-58 speech depart-
ment playbill at 8 p.m. Thursday
through Saturday at the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
As well as opening the 1957-58
season, "Arsenic and Old Lace"
will be the basic attraction for the
high. school drama clinic, spon-
sored by the department of speech,
on Friday. A special matinee will
be held for high school students to
demonstrate the feasibility of pro-
ducing this play in a high school.
Following the presentation of
this play for hih school students,
a discussion will be held on the
costuming and staging, according
to the director, Prof. Jack E. Ben-
der of the speech department.
Kesselring's comedy centers
around two old ladies who "cure"'
the loneliness of old men by giving
them a glass of wine with arsenic.
The bodies of ,their thirteen- vic-
tims are taken care of by their
nephew Teddy, who is convinced
that he is Teddy Roosevelt.
Mistaking the effects of arsenic
for an epidemic of yellow fever,
Teddy believes that he must bury.
the victims in the "Panama Canal"
that he is digging in the base-,
ment.

DR. VAN ZONNEVELD
Expert Urg(
In Housing.
By JOHN AXE
Despite the present tendency to
try to house older people in insti-

will be seen;
lance-dramas,
to heroic leg-
n past.
Cathakali pro-
ely elaborate.
osed of masks
-rise paste, is
colors which
of the char-

tutions or with relatives, there is
no reason why they should be
housed any differently than
younger age groups, Dr. R. J. van
Zonneveld aid yesterday.
Dr. van Zonneveld, who is Co-
ordinant Physician for Gerontolo-
gical Research in the National
Health Research Council, the
Hague, Netherlands, said that in
general this idea of "institutional
housing for older people" has been
greatly de-emphasized in the
Netherlands.
"Instead," he said, "we are try-
ing to let the aged live, as much
as possible independently, in their
own homes and environments."
Dr. van Zonneveld, who was
brought to the University by the
schools of Public Health, Social
Work and the Division of Geron-
tology for yesterday's lecture,
went on to say that groups of little
cottages have been built for this
purpose in many parts of Holland.
"Often," he continued, "they are
grouped around a central home
which can, if necessary, provide
specialized services for the aged
without forcing their removal to
a distant nursing home where
they might be isolated and un-
happy."
"There still remain, however,"
he added, "a number of old people

Prof. Le4
Normality Of Absti
Aged Citizens By ELIOT VE
The apparent weird
ern abstract art was
terday by Prof. Allen
Michigan State Unive
ment of Art.
Prof. Leepa explai
meaning of art chan
to age; how each per
r:the substance of its;
traditional tools of"
and shape. He empha
is as complex as hum:
"The theories of the
don't explain the ma
between art and the
direct way to art seem
tive,"' he said.
Recreate We
He added that son
within the artist dr
recreate the world inx
more compatible to h
Leepa went on to
-Daily-James MacKay particular aspect of ti
DR, VAN ZONNEVELD from representation
..favors aged housing
especially above the ages of 70
or 75 while not being actually ill
are unable to manage for them-
selves and must be cared for con-
stantly, or others who are ever in PRE=
need of continual medical care."
He said, "we still have a prob-
lem of providing more nursing
'homes and hospitals, despite
stepped , up construction of these
facilities, and a large part of our
present plannin g along the line of
old age housing now deals with flu
this. problem."
ight, Tonight An g
Jazz Quartet.
V Wednesday
Hill Audis
. *
Pl
N LEGION i soito ihG
NO 8-6141
nd GUESTS RAYMOND £

ee euyes-

Leepa of the
rsity Depart-
ned how the,
ges from age
iod recreates
art with the
medium, line
sized that art
an nature.
e unconscious
gical rapport
e artist; the
as to be intui-
orld
tething deepi
rives him to
private terms
himself.
talk on one
he shift away
to abstrac-

"Why does the artist a
nature? Does he deal or
ivory tower experience in,
stractions?" In answer t
questions, Prof. Leepa stre
greater freedom of the
artist in his use of line;
dom from the traditional
of direct natural represer
. Equilibrium Is R1ealit
He added, when asked
Mondrianne's structural
can possibly be -an emotic
pression, that this artist's
with an equilibrium of f
his reality.

"This is the real world w
creates out of his situatio
abstract order is his real
sentially then, reality is
artist's own construction,
relative thing," he said,"
any better than Mondriann
asked.

epa Defends Wo:
ract Art Principi
STNER
tion. the changing use of I
dness of mod- shape.
difnir d d :-

i -literally means
id has been called
iting dance-drama
Stories are always
the grand themes
religious fervor.
s are green faced,
-bearded, and per-
natural powers are
an make-up expert
he company to in-
reproductions of
Kathakali masks.
'Osnnibus'
y includes two sets
rhe- music for the.
for the solo fenale
o such an extent
ans for one are un-
other.
visited the United
1 1955, andiappear-
is." The Saturday
Her visit . . . is a
the history of the

DANCE DREAMS-Two of the Dancers of India perform in the
Kathakali dance-dreams, devoted to heroic legends from the
Indian past. The costumes for these dances are elaborate, with
exotic makeup supplying the finishing touches.

MED SOCIE'
MEETING

CURRICULUM STUDY:
Literary :School Courses Evaluated

J ". .. .. 4

By ROBERT JUNKER

The Literary College Curriculum
Study Committee I. conducting an
all-college study of the courses
required for distribution require-
ments, according to Prof. Roger
Heyns, of the psychology depart-
ment, chairman of- the committee.
'The study involves in its first
phase determining what. the dis-

5 Pharmacists
To Give Talks;

will
,rt of
:wak-

not be as
een taken
the pro-

ored by
in con-
1 Week.
diag, at
,nd will

ent

At Convention.
Four professors of the pharmacy
school will speak this week before
the Pan American Congress of
Pharmacy and Biochemistry.
The meetings are scheduled to
last from Nov. 3 through 10, and
and are being held in Washington
D.C..
All four will deliver speeches
before the Congress.
Dean Tom D. Rowe will give his
paper on "Changes Influencing
the Teaching of Pharmacy In the
United States." Prof. Alex Berman
will:talk on "Tradition of Change:
The Hospital Formulary in the
United States."'
"The Selection of 'Process Vari-
ables in Compression Coating"
will be the topic presented by Prof.
Albert Mattocks, while Prof. Ara
Paul will discuss "Biosynthesis of,
Carbon-14-labeled Ergot Alka-
loids."

tribution courses in the sciences,
social sciences, etc., are supposed
to accomplish. The -social science
report in this area is nearing com-
pletion and will be finished in
about a month, Prof. Heyns said.
The second phase of the work
involves a study of the courses now
offered .,to see if they fulfill the
purpose which they should, and if
not, to institute courses which will,
he explained.
'Committee Handles Changes
The committee also handles all
new courses and course 'changes,-
studies inter-college and interde-
partmental courses and programs,
and in general deals with all phases
of the literary college curriculum.
'The Curriculum Committee is,
made up of six .college faculty
members elected for three-year,
terms, with Prof. Irving Copi of
the philosophy department serving
as chairman.
The college initiated this fall the
united science program, which "in-
cludes a new set of introductory
science and -mathematics courses
designed especially for the enter-
ing student who plans to elect any
one 'of the basic sciences as his
major field of study," the curricu-
lum committee's letter to the fac-
ulty explaining the program reads.
Describes Unified Science
This, program is similar to the
science-engineering program of-
fered by the engineering school in
the choice and placement of science
and mathermatics courses. "Cal-
culus is introduced early in 'the
freshman year and is fully used in
the science courses," the informa-
tion sheet describing the new pro-
gram reads.
"The science courses are so in-
tegrated that each makes full use
of the laws and methods learned in
the foregoing courses.
The physics and chemistry

courses are tailored to the needs
of. the science major, whatever his
field of interest," it continues.
The basic program for the fresh-
man and sophomore years includes
four semesters of mathematics
courses of a more advanced nature
than are usually offered freshmen.
Two semesters each of chemistry
and physics, which are integrated
into the program, are required of
students intending to major in any
science, although they pccur at
different times during the first six
semesters depending on the, field
of concentration in the sciences.,
Research Lab Work
"Laboratory work in all the
science courses is of a research
character where the students con-
ceive and execute their own ex-
periments," the letter announcing
the program explains.
Entering freshmen, if they enter
the literary college honors pro-
gram, are allowed to take unified
science in place of honors sections
in other courses, although these
may be elected also, Prof. Heyns.
commented.
The unified science program will:
be fully described in the new An-
nouncements of the literary college

I

AMERICAI
105S. Main

T onight, Toni
The Bob Elliot
Playing Every

'MEMBERS a

TODAY
an: Wednesday.

DIAL
39I NO 2-31
"HIGHEST- RATING!" -Daily N

toriurn, Thurs., Nov.

.. .,

to be published
Heyns said.

Nov. l 7:30P1
ell Hall, Aud. D,

in May, Prof.*

The strangest true experience a young girl in love ever lived!
-
CINRMASCPN1 0W +Roowp"o. ow."
NO ONE SEATED DURING THE' SENSATIONAL ENDING!'
"LEGEND OF EL DORADO" and CARTOON
S * *1
Starts FRIDAY...
"The HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME"
--~: .~.....1S . ....-..-- - -...- -

Coming Soon I

s Y
Weekn
Vonderland
AT LOW
STUDENT
RATES
waits you at any of these'
.TON-STATLER~1
HOTELS
EW YORK CITY:
The Statler
The Savoy-Plaza
he Waldorf-Astoria
The Plaza

Organization
Notices
(Use of this column for announce-
ments of meetings is available to of-
ficially recognized and registered stu-
dent organizations only.)
Circolo Italiano, Nov. 7; 8:00 p.m.,
League. Speaker: Prof. Ernst Pulgram,
"Reminiscences on Italy."
Folklore Society, Nov. 7, 7:30 p.m.,
Hussey Rm., League. Shortbusiness
meeting followed by folk record ses-
sion. All -welcome. Bring records.
Sociedad Hispanica, Nov. 6, 7:30 p.m.,
Union Conference Room. Miss Virginia
Luis of Birmingham High School will
show slides of Mexico. Refreshments.
s* *
Pre-Medical :society, mass meeting,
Nov. 7, 7:30 p.m., Angell Hall,. Aud. D.
Speaker: Dr. Robert Lovell, Chm. of
Admissions, U of M Medical School.
---- "re -s "-
Physics Club, meeting, Nov. 6, 7:30
p.m. 2038 Randall Lab. Speaker: Dr.
DeRocco, "Certain Features of Macro-
molecules.'
Hillel, Elementary Hebrew classes,
Nov. 6, 7:30 p.m., Hillel.
Hillel, mass meeting of Hillel Players
in conjunction with Ann Arbor Dra-
matie Workshop, Nov. 7, 8:00 p.m.,
Hillel..

'

Gilbert & Sullivan.
"TRIAL BY JURY"
and
"THE SORCERER"
Nov. 21, 22, 23

ENDING
TONIGHT!

_:,m ""\1 1 """" tl~tm ,"---u-*""

"A GEM.
FROM ITALY!"
-Cue
Magazine

W DIAL
NO 8-6
"'The Gold of Naples:
a.noteworthy exam
of how a movie ou
to be put together

r".

36
ews-
416
is
iple
ght
.
a

DIAL
NO 2-2513

\ ii\ ~ ,d 1'
pt ' ',Iz i

TICKETS NOW ON SALE - $2.50, $2.00
Auditorium Box Office Opens 10 A.M. to .

NC
o

For Outrage
Above and Beyond"

Get More Out
Of Life .
Go Out to a Movie
ous Conduct
The Call of Beauty!
The G.1 Comedy
Filmed Entirely;
Off Limits!

4

Sophia

SilNana Mangano-Toto
OF
Premieres THURSDAY
"BRIGHTEST VITTORIO.DE SICA.
ENTERTAINMENT PH'' ""PRESLE
PACKAGE OF
THE YEAR"
-Cue Magazipe A R K
PA RK"

THE INDIA STUDENT ASSN.
-~ presents
tDIRE.CT FROM BROADWAY RUN
O FIRST TIME IN WESTERN HEMISPHERE
ROGER 1, STEVENS
THE AIARICAN NATIONAL THEATRE AND ACADEMY
} .r{SH ANTA RAO,
F... KthakaliDancrC3s ad Musicians
Comipany of 20
o I v C
fare. M u~ea of THASI OUNDATION
^ . . A stunhing and stimulating evening from start to finish"
Walt r err,"Now'YokHeraldTibue
"A visit with ShantIn Roo is, imperative!"
"o"rcta oleman, New York Da ly Mirror
SHANTA RAG'ANRITAOIAN ening CStar, Washington, D. C.
Tau 8 eo wniU TShMANAGEMENpINC.F dDera ctieon-R#Wtind1. Sr. . K Y 19,
TONIGHT at 8:00
HILL AUDITORIUM
"~e:t c om m m do oo et tcti )C=(.=

Loren - Vittorio De Sic

JACK IEMMOII
ERNIE KOVACS
KATHRYN GRAM
ARTHUR O'CONNEUl
I~MICKEY RODNEY

4

...

HINGTON, D.C.j
The Statler

DEPARTMENT FPEECH
Presents
Kesselring's Riotous Farce Comedy
"Arsenic and Olid L ace"

SOPH SHOW of 1957

CRAZY"

BUFFALOt
The Statler

BOSTON:

Presented bySophimo're Cluss ofr 1960

I1

I

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