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October 29, 1957 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-10-29

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TI

LN DAILY TUESDAY, OCTC

iSIC EDUCATION ON WUOM:
'Festival of Song' Starts Eighth Year

Hopwood Play Tonight

Student Councils To Meet

By JOAN KAATZ
Beginning its eighth year, WU-
M's music education program,
Festival of Song," is a success.
This unique state-wide music
resentation, directed by Prof.
dythe M. Albert, provides,
Zrough radio, a music class for
,000 children in rural and con-
lidated schools throughout Mich-
,an.
The program is presented live on
'esday and Thursday eachcweek
r Washtenaw County school
iildren. It is then taped and sent
schools throughout the state.
Conducted as School
The class is conducted as an
dinary school hour with Prof.
[bert as, teacher. A quartet of
ur University music school stu-
ents acts as guests for the listen-
g audience.
The show, designed for elemen-
iry school children, is "an in-
ructional program, not a listen-
Lg program, in which the students
rng right along with the radio
uartet," according to Prof. Albert.
At the beginning of the school
ear books of songs are distributed
ithe schools for use when listen-
ig to the show. The books re-
mble those Prof. Albert would
se if he were teaching an ordinary
assroom.
Dances Explained
Not only are songs taught, but
ances and uses of rhythm instru-
.ents are explained by the radio
acher. The entire music- curricu-
m is set up by the radio station.
Various music experts and for-
ign singers help add variety to the
rogram. Last spring a well-known
ocean singer participated on the.
ogram, teaching the audience a
orean song and then singing the'

Americahn song, "Oh Susanna" as
Korean children do.
At the end of the school year
many of the participating schools
have their own "live" -song festi-
vals. Either the students put on
the show by themselves or the
school invites Prof. Albert and
group to come to the school and
perform.
Often Community Comes
"Not only do children attend this
performance, but often the whole
community turns up for the show.
In many places the only music edu-
cation to be found in the area is

our radio program," Prof. Albert
said.
The tqurs which the quartet
makes with the show often end up
being placement agencies for the
student members of the quartet.'
"Many school superintendents are
in such great need of music teach-
ers that they offer the students'
jobs right on the spot, knowing'
they have had good training on the
Festival of Song," Prof. Albert
said.
Students participating this year
include Fran Sekles, '58SM, Mary

McLoskey,
'58SM, and

.'59SM, Sue Leffler,
Robert Stasiuk, '58SM.

I

Many participating school teach-
ers have written the studio. They
say that the radio program helps
their children form good listening
habits which carry over into their
other subjects as well.
Lynn M. Bartlett, state superin-
tendent of public instruction this
year said that the program "is a
wonderful opportunity for schools
in Michigan to utilize the tremen-
dous pioneering work done by the
University in certain new tech-
niques of teaching."

Students and principals from
almost every high school in Mich-
igan will converge on campus to-
day for the 13th annual Michigan
Conference of Student Councils to
be held in Rackham Auditorium.
The event, sponsored by the
University, is directed by Donald
W. Dolan, General Consultant of
the Bureau of School Services.
Presiding at the 10:00 a.m. gen-
eral assembly will be Ray E. Ke-
hoe, assistant director of the bu-
reau.
SGC President Joe Collins, '58.

and Ron Shorr,'58.administrative
vice president, will speak at the
conference luncheons on the
theme of the day, "Student Lead-
ership and Citizenship."
Conference activities will begin
at 9:30 a.m. and will be inter-
rupted at 11:45 a.m. for lunch
which is scheduled for both the
League and Union. The confer-
ence will adjourn at 3:00 p.m.
Plans for the day include an
opening session address by Kehoe
on "New Ideas for Citizenship
Training."

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(Continued from Page 4)
Academic Notices
Preliminary Examinations in English:
Applicants for the Ph.D. in English who
expect to take the preliminary exam-
inations this fall are requested to
leave their names with Dr. Ogden, 1634
Haven Hall. The examinations will be
given as follows: English and Ameri-
can Literature, 1550-1660, Tues., Nov.
19; 1660-1790, Sat., Nov. 23; 1790-1870,
Tues., Nov. 26; and 1870-1950. Sat., Nov.
30. The examinations will be given in
School of Business Administration
Building inditoom 267 from 9:00 a.m.
to 12:00 a.m.
Mathematics Colloquium. Dr. Joseph
Kruskal of the University of Wisconsin
will speak on "Group Presentations
and the Free Calculus" on Tues., Oct.
29. Coffee and tea in Room 3212, An-
gell Hall (Commons Room) at 3:45
p.m.'.
Botanical Seminar: Dr. Edward G.
Voss, Michigan Flora Project, will speak

Js..

on "Progress on the 'Flora of Michi-
gan' " Wed., Oct. 30, 4:15 p.m. 1139
Natural Science. Refreshments at 4 p.m.
Linguistics Club meeting Wed., Oct
30 at 8:00 p.m. in. West Conference
Room, Rackham Building. Reports on'
the Eighth International Congress of
Linguists held in Oslo, August, 1957.
Speakers: Profs. Fries, Penzl, Pike, Pul-
gram; an'd' Prof. H. Josselson of Wayne
U. All persons interested in the scien-
tific study of language are invited.
Seminar, Dept. of Anatomy. Wed.,
Oct. 30, 11:00 a.m. 5th Floor Conference
Room, Kresge Clinical Research Build-
ing. Dr. Jos. P. Schade, head, depart-
ment of Neuro-physiology, Netherland
Central Institute for Brain Research:
Demonstration of the Rectograph, and
tour of the laboratory of Neurosurgical
Research.
FOREIGN VISITORS
The following foreign visitors are to
be on the campus this week on the
dates indicated. Program arrangements
are being made by the International
Center: Mrs. Minler.
Mr. Chansamone, U.S. Information
Agency, Laos, Oct. 28-29.
Mr. Sarino, Member of Parliament,
former Minister of Educ., Indonesia,
Oct. 28.
Mr. Siahaan, Head of Extension
Courses, Ministry of Education, Indo-
nesia, Oct. 28.
Mr. Manuel Rojas Sepulveda, Free
Lance Writer, Chile, Oct. 30-Nov. 1.
Mr. Hiroshi Enomoto, U.S. Informa-
tion Agency, Japan, Oct. 30-Nov. 3.
The following foreign visitor's pro-
gram arrangementsare being made by
the Political Science Department: Dr.
Pollock:
Mr. Hannes Ulrich Bernhard Pusch,
Secy. of Schlesig-holstein C.D.U., Ger-
many, Oct. 30.
Placement Notices
Personnel Interviews:
Representatives from the following
will be at the Engrg. School:
Wed., Oct. 301
Hooker-Electrochemical Co., Niagara
Falls, N.Y. - B.S. & M.S. in Chem.E.
Process, Development, Prod., and Sales.
link-Belt Co., Chicago, Ill. - B.S. in
Civil, Elect., Ind., and Mech. for Prod.
Design, and Sales.
Metals and Controls Corp., Attleboro,
Mass. - all levels in Ch.E.; & Metal.,
M.S. in Nuclear, and B.S. in Elect.,
Mech., and E. Physics for Devel., De-
sign, Prod. and Sales.
State of Ohio, Columbus, Ohio - all
levels in Civil for Research, Devel., De-
sign, Prod., Const., Sales and all phases
of highway engrg.
Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co., all levels

in Ch.E., B.S. and M.S. in Civil, Elect.,
Ind., Mech., E. Math., E. Mech., E. Phy-
sics, and B.S. in Science for, Research,
Devel., Design, Prod., Quality and Prod.
Control, and Maintenance Engrg.
Spaulding Fibre Co., Lansing, Mich.
- B.S. in Ch.E., Civil, Elect., Ind.,
Mech., Metal. and E. Physics for Mktg.,
Prod., Sales and Liaison Work.
For appointments contact the Engrg.
Placenent Office, 347 W.E., ext. 2182.
Representatives from the following
will be at the Bureau of Appointments:
Thurs., Oct. 31
Equitable Life Insurance of New
York, Detroit, Mich., is looking for
men with any degree for an Adminis-
trative Training Program.
Burroughs Corp., Detroit, Mich., is
looking for men with any degree for
Sales,
A representative will be on campus
from the Canadian Dept. of External
Affairs to talk with Canadian students
about careers in the Canadian Foreign
Service. Examination will be given on
Sat., Nov. 25. The maximum age is 31,
but there is no minimum.
For appointments contact the Bu-
reau of Appointments, 3528 Admin.,
Ext. 3371.
Personnel Requests:
The Ohio Boxboard Co., Rittman,
Ohio, has a Public Relations position
open for a man with a background in
Journalism and Public Relations.
A radio station in this vicinity needs
a well-trained evening announcer, able
to operate his own board and tape re-
cording apparatus. His main duty will
be as disc-jockey, but he will also do
other announcing.
Turner Mfg. Co., Chicago, Ill., is
looking for Forestry majors for posi-
tions in manufacturing of wall decor-
ative furnishings and furniture,
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Adnin.,
Ext. 3371,

-Daily-.David Arnold
REHEARSAL IN PROGRESS - A 1957 major Hopwood Award
winner in Drama will be presented as the first laboratory bill of
the speech department at 8 p.m. today in Rm. 2528 Frieze Bldg.
"Reach for a Dream," by William Hawes; Grad., dramatizes the
conflict which the college student finds between idealism and
materialism. Major characters in this production will be played by
James Young, Grad., Robert Winters, '59, Roger Allen, Grad., and
Bea Minkus, '58. Prof. William P. Halstead, of the speech depart-
ment, will direct the production with Nancy Enggass as associate
director,
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