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October 26, 1957 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-10-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

VWW. MICHIGAN UATTIV

SATURDAY, OCTOBER z8, I957

4AlTw'

;.: U'E' ' w L UV 1 A vi1 Vt1 LiA1.1 ~STRAOTBR2,1

ALLY COMPARISON SHOWS:
Fraternity,_Dorm CostsVary

Fry Explains New Uses
For Ultrasonic Sound

GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS:
Danforth Foundation Reports Openings

(4' -

The average fraternity member
Mpays more and higher bills than
the average student residing in
the University residence halls.
This was the finding of a recent
Daily comparison of dormitory
and fraternity living.
Dormitory residents have to
pay, on the average, $88.33 per
month for room and board. This
figure is based on a 21 meals per
week basis.
Fraternity Men Pay
In comparison, the fraternity
member living and eating in the
chapter house is charged, again
on the average; $89.10 every
Hopwood Play
To Be Given
ext Tuesday
"Reach for a Dream," by Wil-
liam Hawes, Grad., will be pre-
sented as the first laboratory bill
of the speech department at 8
p.m. Tuesday in Rm. 2528 Frieze
Bldg.
A major Hopwood Award win-
ner in 1957,'the play dramatizes
the conflict which the college stu-
dent finds between idealism and
materialism.
Performance in a classroom
stage without costumes or scen-
ery, the action of the play -has
been only blocked for major
groupings.
Lead parts in "Reach for a
Dream" will be played b'y James
Young, Grad., Robert Winters,
'59, Roger Allen, Grad. and Be-
atrice Minkus, '58. Prof. William
P. Halstead, of the speech depart-
ment, will direct the production.
NancyEnggass will be associate
director.
There is no admission, to this
performance, which should be of
particular interest to studen'ts of
theatre and creative writing
classes.
Fischer Joins
CUS. Council
Prof. Carl H. Fischer, of the
- business administratin depart-
ment has been appointed to a na-
tional Advisory Council on Social
Security Financing.
Members of the 12-man coun-
cil, appointed by Marion B. Fol-
som, Secretary of Health, Educa-
tion and Welfare, will review the
long-range financial position of
the social security system.
The review, ordered by Con-
gress last year, will examine the
status of the Old-Age and Sur-
vivors Insurance Trust Fund and
the new Disability Insurance
'Trust Fund, in relation to the
long-term committments of these
programns.
Also under consideration will be
'the social security tax increases
scheduled for 1960.
Organization"
Notices
(Use of this column for announce-
ments of meetings is available to of-
ficially recognized and registered stu-
dent organizations only.)
Hillel, mass meeting for Hillel Play-
ers, Oct. 27, 4:30 p.m., Hillel Founda-
tion."

New uses 'for

ultrasonic sound

month. This figure is not based on
a 21 meal per week basis as in
the residence halls, but on a 19
meal per week schedule.
Fraternity m e n interviewed
contend that their meals, being
Farm Crops
.Prophesied
By Students
University students enrolled in
a special seminar in quantitative
economics are currently forecast-
ing next year's onion andI water-
melon crops, among .other things.
The course, designed to permit
students to solve current economic
problems first hand, deals pri-
marily in mathematical models of
economic activities.
Onions, Anyone
For instance, in predicting what's
what with onions next year, the
students developed a supply sched-
ule, relating the quantity of onions
available to last year's prices; a
demand equation, relating per cap-
ita onion consumption to farm
prices; and an unharvested crop
equation, relating unharvested
onion quantities to prices.
The workings of the model are
tested by comparing, what hap-
pened in previous years against
what should have happened, ac-
cording to the model. When the
model checks out, it is used for
forecasting.
Plan More
The students in the course have
another, more ambitious project
on the fire now. They are working
out a 22-e'quation model for fore-
casting what the basic components
of the national economy will each
amount to next year.
Results of their studies will be
presented at the National Confer-
ence on the Economic Outlook,
Nov. 4 and 5, which is sponsored
by the University's economics de-
partment.
The program was initiated seven
years ago, by a Ford Foundation
grant. It is the only one of its kind
in the United States.

served family style, offer the stu-
dent a greater .quantity of food
with a home atmosphere. They
add there is no "production line"
dining as in the University resi-
dence halls.
Dormitory residents, on the
other hand, argue that better
planned meals at less expense are
the main requisites of good eat-
ing. Quantity is available in the
dormitories, they continue, as
well as an atmosphere of cleanli-
ness.
Dues Differ
Social expenses of the two
groups differ sharply. An "acti-
vity fee" constitutes the only
charge the dormitory man has to
pay. This covers all social func-
tions, an Inter-House Council fee
and other dormitory activities.
It also helps to support WCBN,
the quadrangle radio station and
residence hall l i b r a r i e s. John
Squire, '60E, IHC administrative
vice-president, stressed the fact
that no individual is forced to at-
tend any social function or parti-
cipate in any dormitory activity.
Face Bills
Fraternity men face at least
nine monthly social bills during
the school year. The money covers
all chapter functions. Members
are usually expected to attend
many, if not all, of the chapter
functions.
The dormitory student is as-
sessed an average of $7.25 every
school year for his "activity fee."
The affiliated student, usually
billed evesy month, pays a yearly
average of $70.92 for social pur-
poses.
Total Expense Given
The expense for the average
fraternity man living and eating
in the chapter house is $96.98 per
month. This does not include any
special assessments such as par-
ty favors, house pictures and spe-
cial banquets.
The student residing in one of
the University residence halls has
to pay $8913.
"Predictability of costs is one
advantage of residence hall liv-
ing," IHC President Drake Duane,
'58, commented. "

were explained to a scientific
meeting at the University yester-
day by Dr. William J. Fry of the
University of Illinois.
Speaking before the 54th meet-
ing of the Acoustical Society of
America, Fry explained that the
Russians claim to have selectively
destroyed cancer tissue - with
beams of high frequency sound.
'Fry also described an ultrasonic
microscope developed at the Uni-
versity of Illinois.. This instru-
ment beams sound through tissue
samples and measures how much
gets through. This makes it pos-
sible to chart distribution of pro-
College
Roundup
University of Chicago students
will face a 23.7 per cent tuition
increase beginning next summer,
according to a recent issue of the
University of Chicago student
newspaper, The Maroon. Under-
graduate tuition will be $840.
John I. Kirkpatrick, vice-chancel-
lor for administration, said new
rates should not affect the num-
ber or size of scholarships because
a corresponding increase is slated
for the student aid fund.
* * *
The Technique, student news-
paper at Georgia Institute of
Technology, reported that a
nurse, escorting a flu patient to
his infirmary bed said, "Now we
want you to be happy while you're
here; if there's anything you'd
like that we haven't got, just tell
me, and I'll show you how to get
along without it."
Students at the University of
Wisconsin are not too concerned
about Sputnik, notes the Daily
Cardinal, campus n e w s p a p e r.
Their general attitude is reflected
in comments such as "It's for the
birds," or "Sputnik should go
sputnik." One student even re-
marked that it was "The greatest
thing that ever lived."

tein in cells. The conventional
optical microscopes cannot do
this.
Brain functions may be mapped
by sweeping focussed beams of
ultrasound through the tissues
and observing the resultant
changes, according to Fry.
"Human neurosurgery by sound-
is just beginning," he added.
"Then, too, ultrasound may be
useful in getting responses for
diagnostic purposes in patients
suffering from various mental
disorders."
About 400 acoustic scientists at-
tended the meeting, and are
scheduled to hear a total of 107
papers before the meeting ends
at noon today.
Papers have been'presented on
ways to silence helicopters, Jet
engine noises, acoustics measure-
ments in the classroom, inter-
cardiac acoustics and language
intelligibility.
Nine Schools
Organize New
.Association
Nine state supported colleges
and universities in Michigan have
formed an association to deal with
mutual problems in education.
Called the Association of Gov-
erning Boards and Presidents of
the State Universities and Col-
leges in-Michigan, the group's ac-
tion was commended by Gov. G.
Mennen Williams at the formation
meeting last Thursday,
President Harlan Hatcher called
the association a consultation and
discussion group designed to help
the individual governing boards
understand basic problems- that
involve other institutions in rela-
tionship to each one's problems.
Problems discussed at Thurs-
day's meeting included the support
for higher education in Michigan
now and in the future and the
present enrollment picture with
special regard to the financial
status of students.
University Regent Roscoe 0.
Bonisteel presided over the meet-
ing-attended by 40 representa-
tives of the various institutions.
Gov. Williams was quoted as
saying that one of the purposes of
the group "will be to eliminate
unhealthy aspects or rivalry be-
tween the institutions. It is at least
alleged that the Universiy and
Michigan State University have
been actively recruiting students
to keep them from going to the
smaller colleges.
The second meeting of the group
is expected to be held within the
next 90 days, said Hatcher.

The Danforth Foundation has
announced openings in its 1958
class of Danforth graduate fellows.
Located in St. Louis, Mo., the
Foundation offers one of the major
academic honors available to the
student entering graduate school.
President Harlan Hatcher has
appointed Prof. Robert 0. Blood,
Jr., of the sociology department, as
the University's liaison officer to
nominate ,two or. possibly three
candidates for these fellowships.
- Qualifications Include
Qualifications stipulate that the
applicant be male and entering
graduate school in preparation for
college teaching. Selection is made
on the basis of outstanding aca-
demic ability, personality congenial
to the classroom, integrity andl

character, including a serious in-
quiry within the Christian tradi-
tion.
Where financial need exists the,
Foundation will aid the Fellow
with grants straight through to
his doctorate. However, financial
need is not a condition for ap-
pointment.
A Danforth Fellow may use the
fellowship at any accredited uni-
versity in the United States. The
appointment is for one year with
the expectation of annual renewal
through the years of graduate
study.
Men in the natural and biologi-
cal sciences and in the social scien-
ces are particularly encouraged to
apply. There are no race or color
restrictions.

The maximum annual grant is
$1,400 plus tuition and fees for
single men and $2,400 plus tuition
and fees for married students. An
additional stipend of $350 is made
for families having children.
May Hold Awards
Men receiving the fellowship
may also hold other awards such
as a Rhodes Scholarship or a
Woodrow Wilson Fellowship. How-
ever, a recipient holding another
award becomes a Danforth Fellow
"without stipend" until the other
fellowship lapses.
All applications, including rec-
ommendations, must be completed
by Jan. 31, 1958. Any student wish-
program should contact Prof.
Blood in 5622 Haven Hall.

I_.

Come

to Church

i

Sunday

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Dr. Chester H. Loucks, Minister
Mrs. Beth Mahone, Assistant Student
Counselor
9:45 Student class will continue its study of basic
tenets of the Christian faith. 1
11:00 The Rev. Hugh Pickett will be the guest
preacher.
6:30 The Roger Williams Fellowship will meet in
the Chapman room of the church. The Rev.
Merrill Abbey, minister of the First Methodist
Church of Ann Arbor, will speak on the topic
"God Was in Christ."
CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1131 Church St.
Dr. E. H. Palmer, Minister
9:30 Sunday Schools. University Bible Class with
Prof. G. Van Wylen as its teacher.
10:30 Worship Service "Slaves of Christ."
7:00 Worship Service. "God's Patients Abused."
PRESBYTERIAN STUDENT CENTER
at the FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
Rev. William S. Baker, Campus Minister
Miss Patricia Pickett, Assistant
Morning Worship at 9:00, 10:30, and 12:00,
Henry Kuizenga, Minister of the Church.
Seminar, "The Significance of the Church" at
10:30.
Coffee break, 11 :30 to 12:00.
WSF Forum at 6:45 P.M., showing movie, "High
Wall."
Join in Reformation Day service at Bethlehem E.
& R. Church at 8:00 P.M.
Mid-week Vespers at 5:10 Wednesday, preceeded
by coffee break.
Bible Study of Hosea at 4:15- Thursday at the
League.
Grad. supper and discussion at 6:15 on Friday.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN titt
VAW &...fl~Wltfly.V.fl' ~ . ..rv .....~Si :C
.t' V ~ ' :'~!V.W

(Continued from Page 2)
Concerts
The Men's Glee Club will present the
University of Munster Madrigal Choir
in a free concert on Sat., Oct. 26, at
8:30 p.m. in Hill Auditorium.
Academic Notices
Medical College Admission Test: Can-
didates taking the Medical College Ad-
mission Test on Oct. 29 are requested
to report to Room 140; Business Ad-
ministration Building at 8:45 a.m. Tues.
Aeronautical Enginegring Seminar.
Rolland Willaume, director of the In-
ternational Exchange Program, NATO-
Advisory Group for Aeronautical Re-
search and Development will talk on
"Opportunities with NATO-Agard,"
Mon., Oct. 28 at 4:00 p.m. in Room
1042, East Engineering Building.
Doctoral Examination for Lois Wladis
Hoffman, Sociology; thesis: "Some Ef-
fects of the Employment of Mothers
on Family Structure," Mon., Oct. .28,
5607 Haven Hall, at 2:30 p.m. Chairman
Ronald Lippitt.r
Placement Notices

Hiram Walker & Sons, Inc., Peoria,
111. - B.S. & M.S. in Ch.E., and M.E.
for Production - Summer and Regular.
Modine Mfg. Co., Racine, Wis., - B.S.
in Civil, Ind., Elect., and Mech. for
Research, Development, Design, Prod.
and Sales.
United Aircraft Corp., Sikorsky Air-
craft Div. - B.S. and M.S. in Aero.,
Ch.E., Civil, Elect., Instru., E. Math.,
Mech., E. Mech., Metal., Naval & Ma-
rine, and E. Physics for Summer and
Regular Research, Development and
Design.
Mon. & Tues., Oct. 28 & 29
Esso Standard Oil Research Labs.,
Baton Rouge, La. - all levels in Chem.
E., for Summer and Regular Technical
and Research Activities.
Tues., Oct. 29
Allis-Chalmers Mfg. Co. - all levels
in Elect., Ind., Mech., Metal., and Nuc.,
B.S. & M.S. in E. Mech., B.S. in Ma-
terials, and Naval, also BBA for Re-
search, Dev., Design, Prod., and Sales.
ARO, Inc., Tullahoma, Tenn., - all-
levels in Aero., Elect., Instru., Mech.,
and B.S. in E. Math., and E. Physics for
Summer and Regular Research, Dev.
and Design.
Curtiss-Wright Corp., Wood-Ridge,
N.J. -all levels in Aero., Chem. E.,
Elect:, Mech., Metal., & Nuc., and B.S.
in E. Math. and E. Physics for Re-
search, Dev., and Design.
Hazeltine Corp., Little Neck, N.Y. --
B.S. in Ind., Mech., and E. Physics and
B.S. & M.S. in Elect. for Summer and
Regular Research, Dev., Design, Prod.,
Field, Test and Project Admin.
Sundstrand Machine Tool Co., Rock-
ford, Ill. - B.S. & M.S. in Ind., and
Instru., and B.S. in Mech., Metal., and
E. Physics for Research and Dev., De-
sign,. Prod.; and Application.
Taylor Instrument Co., Rochester,
N.Y. - all levels in Elect. E., Mech.,
M.S. in Instru., and B.S. in Che.E.,
Metal., and E. Physics for Summer and
Regular Research, Dev., Design and
Sales.
National Security Agency, Washing-
ton, D.C. - all levels Elect., Mech.,
Physics and Math for Research, Devel-
opment, and Design.
Tues., & Wed., Oct. 29 & 30
Douglas Aircraft Co., Inc., Santa
Monica, Calif. - all levels in Aero.,
Civil, Elect., Mech., E. Mech., Nuc., B.S.
in E. Math. and E. Physics for Research
Development, and Design:
Convair Div. of General Dynamics
Corp., Calif. & Texas - all levels in
Aero., Chem. E., Civil, Elect., Mech.
Metal., and B.S. in Math. for Research,
Development, and Design.{
For appointments contact the Engrg.
Placement Office, 347 W.E., Ext. 2182.

in Sociology, Social Work, or Social
Sciences for Social Work, pre-profes-
sional Social Work. They administer
public assistance i.e., old age assis-
tance, aid to dependent children for
the State of Michigan in Wayne Co.
Social workers carry a field caseload
determining eligibility and need for as-
sistance and providing some casework
services.
Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance
Co., Detroit, Mich. - Feb. and June
grads., men with any degree for Sales.
Company handles life insurance, pen-
sion plans, annuities, profit sharing,
etc.
Officer Procurement, U.S. Army, Wo-
men's Army Corp. - Women are need-
ed who have college degrees. You can
be commissioned as a Lieutenant in
the WACs; with opportunities for
good pay and travel. Capt. Elizabeth
Harth will be on campus to interview
all interested candidates. If even
interested, you are invited to ' drop
around for a chat.
Wed., Oct. 30
The Procter & Gamble Distributing
Co., Cincinnati, Ohio - Feb. grads
only - men with any degree for Sales.
Thurs., Oct. 31
A representative will - be on campus
from the Canadian Dept. of External
Affairs to talk with Canadian students
aboutscareers in the Canadian Foreign
Service. Examination will be held in
Windsor on Sat., Nov. 25. The maxi-
mum age is 31, but there is no mini-
mum.
For appointments contact the Bureau
of Appointments, 3528 Admin. Bldg.,
ext. 3371.

,!
r
i
t
L
r
s
5
5
1
s
i
i
t

On LYDIA MENDELSSOHN
STAGE

NEXT WEEK!
Oct. 31, Nov. 1, 2
the
"SPI N E-TI NGLI NG"
-N.Y. Herald Tribune
Broadway Hit
RAI
bo IaaAft V Qkm
Box Office Opens Mon., Oct. 28
Ann Arbor CIVIC THEATRE

9:30 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. Sunday Morning Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday, Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street. Reading room hours are: Mon-
day 1 1 :00 A.M. to 8:30 P.M. Tuesday - Sat-
urday 11:00 A.M. to 5 P.M. Sunday 2:30 to
4:30 P.M.

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner ate & Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor
8:45 A.M. and 11:00 A.M. Morning Worship
Services. "Setbacks-Their Cause and Cure."
10:00 A.M. Sunday School.
5:45 P.M. Student Guild.
7:00 P.M. Evening Service. "Let No Man Take
Thy Crown."
Wednesday-7:30 P.M. Prayer Meeting.
WE WELCOME YOU!
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
and STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Ronald L. Johnstone, Vicpr
Sunday at 9:15 and 10:45: Services, with Refor-
mation Sunday sermon by the vicar, "Love,
Liberty, and Service-Themes of the Reforma-
tion."
Bible study groups at 9:15 and 10:45 A.M.
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, supper and program with talk by Mis-
sionary E. Bergt about his work in Japan.
Thursday at 8:00: Reformation Day showing of
90 minute movie "Marn Luther." No admis-
sion charge or offering. Public invited.
Friday at 8:00: Married Couples' meeting.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL.
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill at S. Forest
Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-9:00 and 11:00 A.M. Worship Services.
"10:00 A.M. Bible Study.
6:00 P.M. International Student Supper and
Program.
Tuesday-7:15 P.M. Class-Influence of Classical
Cultures on Christendom.
Thursday-9:30 P.M. Vespers.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. NO 5-2665; Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 Morning Service.
7:00 Evening Service.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
L. C. Utley, Minister
SUNDAYS: 10:00, 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.;
WEDNESDAYS: 7:30 P.M.
Television: Sundays 2:30 P.M., Channel 6,
Lansing.
Radio: Sundays 5:30 P.M. WXYZ 1270
For transportation to services Dial NO 3-8273.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL &
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Herbert R. Lowe, Student Assistant Pastor
Paul R. Eberts, Minister to Students
9:45 A.M. Student Guild Coffee and Study Hour,
10:45 A.M. Worship Service. Topic, "How Can
I Learn to Understand More of the Bible," by
Rev. Press.
7:00 P.M. Student Guild.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Rev. Leonard A. Parr, Minister
10:45 A.M. Church School, Nursery and Junior
Church.
10:45 A.M. Public worship. Dr. Leonard A. Parr
will preach on the subject, "Passing Through."
Student Guild 6:50 and then will join in the
Reformation Day service at Bethlehm Church.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Re* John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Paul V. Matheson, Assistant
Sunday Masses: 8:00, 9:30, 1 :00 A.M. and
12:00 noon.
Weekday Masses: 6:30, 7:00, 8:00 and 9:00
A.M.
Novena Devotions: Wednesday evening, 7:30 P.M.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 P.M.
Classes each evening in Christian Doctrine, Apolo-
getics, Church History, Scholastic Philosophy,
in the Father Richatd Center.

t
,.

j:

FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
10:00 A.M. Meeting for Worship.
10:00 A.M. Sunday School.
11 :30 A.M. Meeting for Worship.
11:30 A.M. Adult Study Class.
Young Friends 7:00 P.M. Thomas Kelly's "Devo-
tions."

11

4'

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and sermon fol-
lowed by breakfast and discussion in Canter-
bury House.
11:00 A.M. Morning prayer and sermon.
4:00 P.M. Graduate Canterbury.
5:30 P.M. Canterbury Evensong in Chapel.
6:00 P.M. Canterbury buffet supper.
7:00 P.M. Speaker: The Rev. Lester L. Dobyns,
Associate Rector Christ Church Cranbrook,
Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. Topic: Christian
Responsibility vs. College Conformity.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Merril P. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl, William
B. Hutchison, Eugene A. Ransom, ministers.
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:00 Sermon by Dr. Merril R. Abbey:
"On Being a Real Protestant."
6:45 Worship and Prograim. Student Panel: "A
Christian Approach to Integration."
There will be no Fellowship Supper or Discussion
Group this week.

;

1

1'

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister.
9:45 A.M. Church School.
10:45 A.M. Sermon by Rev. Russell M. Fuller,
Topic: "The Trustees of Truth."
- . -r ~. A I2 . A . .- I II Ce

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw at Berkshire
Edwnrd H. Redman. Minister

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