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October 20, 1957 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-10-20
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY MAGAZINE

Sunday,-October 20, 1957

Sunday, October 20, 1957

THE MICHIGAN DAILY MAGAZINE

I7 Aclrpgan hal
MAGAZINE

OPERA:

STATE STREET

Race Problei

Vol. IV, No. 2

5unday, October

20, 1957

CONTENTS -

OPERA By Harry Dunscombe
SIBELIUS By David Kessel
BRAINWASHING By John B. Dalbor
'VOSS' By Roy Akers
THE MIGHTY MESABI By James Bow
'EXILES & MARRIAGES' - By R. C. Gregory
THE FOLK SONG By Rose Perlberg
RACE PROBLEMS By John Weicher
STATE STREET SURGERY By Jo Ann Hardee
STRATFORD By Jean Willoughby
RUSSIAN TOUR By Lewis Engman
A RIOT? By Akira Ebuchi

Page
Page
Page
Page
Page
Page.
Page
Page
Page
Page
Page
Page

3
4
6
7
8
9
10
10
11
12
14
16

(Continued from Page 11)
wrought below. For those seeking
the intellectual stimulation they
did not find in the shop down-
stairs, there are $2.98 games in.
which are rock and seashell sam-
ples for the geologically-minded
students, bugs and leaves for the
zoology and botany major.
But the student cannot escape,
even in this paradise of the past.
The handwriting on the wall is the
big black letters on the corrugated
aluminum front or the red letters
of the electric sign at the back of
the store.
Tradition is being crushed in a
wild stampede toward progress.
ALREADY THE trend has been
followed by other merchants.
Another bookstore has changed its
facade. But behind that glass and
mock marble exterior is an in-
terior of solid sameness.
More serious are the changes in
the drug store, which has mini-
mized the thrill of the search by

placing merchandise in reachable
locations and installing mid-twen-
tieth century lighting. Frighten-
ingl
Equally frightening is the pros-
pect of what may happen to State
Street if this frenzy for modern-
ization continues. Rumors, as yet
unconfirmed, are that the bank
may be expanded, a move which
would tend to thwart the deep
intellectual exchange which oc-
curs as people wait in line those
first days of registration.
Perhaps the "they" who have
done this thing could be persuaded
to reverse the trend toward non-
traditionalism themselves. W i t h
little effort, the most violent of-
fender could be restored to its
original cozy size.
As for the remainder of the
building, it need not be a complete
loss to the community. The re-
moval of a few floor cases and the
addition of more bins and shelves
with a meat counter, and a com-
munity shame can become a mean-
ingful contributor to man's growth.

MAGAZINE EDITOR: Tammy Morrison
MAGAZINE PHOTOGRAPHER: Bud Bentley
PICTURE CREDITS-Unless specified, photographs are Daily photo-
graphs by Bud Bentley. Page 2: Photograph courtesy University
News Service; Page 3: Photograph courtesy School of Music;
Page 4: Photograph by Associated Press Newsphotos; Page 8:
Photograph by Perry Ryan; Page 12: Photograph by David Kessel;
Page 13: Photograph by David Kessel; Page 15: Photographs
courtesy School of Music; Page 17: Photographs courtesy Akira
Ebuchi.

(Continued from Page 10) 1
seems to move southward and
eastward continually; a new line
is set up every few years.
PERHAPS THE major reason for
the failure of this policy is the
presence of older, not so well kept
up houses in every neighborhood.
Ofteh -Negroes seeking better com-
munities move into these places,
starting the evacuation process
over again. In addition, many of
the more well-to-do white fami-
lies move to the suburbs, leaving
vacancies.
The ideal solution, complete
mutual tolerance, is absolutely
out of the question. One reason is
the short time in which all these
events have happened. Nearly ev-
ery adult resident, including those
in their early twenties, can re-
member back ten or fifteen years
to when things were different. Any
educational campaign is in for
tough sledding. Interracial crimes
add fuel to the fire, but the basic
desires of preservation on the part
of the whites and improvement of
living conditions of the Negroes
are very nearly mutually exclusive
in Chicago at present; this is just
what the trouble is.
A LONG-RANGE solution is to
stop the problem at its source,
to limit thenumber of Negroes
coming to Chicago. There is here
the almost insurmountable prac-
tical problem of enforcement. How
do you stop poeple from attempt-
ing to better themselves? Even if
an indirect method could be found,
perhaps by cutting relief payments
to those, who have not held jobs
in the city before seeking aid, po-
litical problems remain. Negroes
form a sizeable part of the Demo-
cratic vote in city elections, and
the Democrats quite naturally do
not 'wish to lose that vote, while
Republicans are equally desirous
of either gaining Negro support or
cutting Negro strength. The ques-
tion disappears into a jungle of
partisan politics.
A rough working solution com-
bining all three of these methods
may be worked. out, as a practi-
cal necessity, to avert either of
two far less pleasant alternatives.
On one hand, the entire South
Side might become Negro, some-
thing neither race really wants.
Such an occurrence would severe-
ly limit new industrial develop-
ment, in the only open area left
to it, on the eve of that expan-
sion. An all-Negro community
might even result in the destruc-
tion of the jobs which brought
them to the city in the first place.

THE OTHER, and worse, alter-
native is race warfare. No one
wants to explore the ramifications
of this possibility. The city had,
a foretaste of it in the Calumet
Park riot this summer. The po-
lice have established that white
youths started the affair and the
offenders have been dealt with
severely, but the story persists in
the white neighborhoods around
the park that,the Negroes really
started it. Another incident is thus
added to a growing list, each leav-
ing a little more animosity. A riot

........-.........

it's holiday
GLASI
Pledge Forn
dances com
formal shoe
your list! O
evening sho
The largest
Formal shoe
tinting a sp
All heel hei
and materia

A SCENE from last year's University production of the opera "Hansel and Gretel," presented joinuy
by the speech department and music school. Pictured are Svea Blomquist as Gretel, Mary Mattfeld
as Hansel, Kathleen Rush as Mother and James Berg as Father.

ne:
set
t
bli
be
car
bal
wi
on
of
sin
the
"
pet
ne:

icing...
and SIZ4
nals or those
ing up, make
s a must on
ne of dozens of
)e styles.
selection of
es in town,
ecialty.
ghts, style
als.
95

" Nl!
L3

AUTHENTIC
STYLING

r

$1

There's a Nationally-Known
Independent Record Dealer
in Ann Arbor
Years of musically intelligent service in an atmosphere

306 SOUTH ST

" "ALREADY THE trend has been followed by other merchants.
Another bookstore has changed its facade. But behind the glass
and mock marble exterior is an interior of solid sameness."

I1i

of congenial informality, have resulted in
position among record dealers.
A COMPREHENSIVE RECORD STOCK --

an envied

TABLE MODEL & CONSOLE RADIO-PONOGRAPHS
RECORD CABINETS AND OTHER ACCESSORIES
TV SETS by RCA VICTOR
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN MUSIC

ASEAT A #1AT S
bys
OF ENGLAND
These are the ORIGINAL
Desert Boots - with many imitators
but no duplicators. Soft, shaggy
uppers, genuine pure gum
rubber bottoms. Very light weight
and comfortable 95
and surprisingly durable. $12

by

I
,
{
f

virgin wool sportswear
The finest in reversible skirts in authentic
Scotch Tartans. $29.95.
The slim Jim panel pleat and pleatmaster
models in beautiful promenade plaids,
tartans and solid colors. $14.95.
Virgin wool sweaters in exact shades to
match. $9.95
The famous 49'er casual jackets. $17.95
and $19.95.

the happiest combination of smart styling and .osy
comfort we've seen are the new IVY Inspired suits
by Style-Mart. Natural shoulders, slim lapels, easy
front, deep vent, plain front trousers-you'll find
all the details tailored In superb all wool flanneh
in solids and stripes.

May we invite you to visit us at either of our
two convenient locations.

$5500
TICE & WREN C&L/ o Men
1107 South University

I

mIiSIC SHOPS

Downtown -- --
205 East Liberti Street
Phone NO 2-0675
- Camnpus -
211 South State Street
Phone NO 8-9013

STATE.

STREET AT LIBER-

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