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October 18, 1957 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-10-18

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY. OCTOBER I. 1957

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Michigan Resources Drop
With Increased Population

A warning that Michigan's nat-
ural resourcesare diminishing un-
checked, as a result of increasing
popultion keynotedna report Tues-
day by Prof., Stanley Cain of the
natural resources school.
Addressing the Michigan Natural
Resources Council in Lansing, he
recommended that the state De-
partment of Conservation under-
take a study to find out how people
use the state's recreational areas
and wildlands.'
Michigan's population has climb-
ed to 7.5 million from 4.8 million
in 1930. Along with this swelling,
more space will be needed, Prof.
Cain added, because "we are more
and more becoming an outdoor
people for our recreation, perhaps
as a reaction to urbanization.'
One of the main problems of the
Incorporation
Of Township
isapproved
Opposition to the proposed in-
corporation of Ypsilanti township
into a separate city, which would
surround the present city of Ypsi-
lanti, has gained momentum in
the la t two days.
Sanford S. Farness, county
planning director, Ypsilanti City
Manager Sinclair Powell, and the
Township Republican Club have
all expressed their disapproval of
the proposal.
"(It>fails to meet the levels of
proper responsibility to the public
and pays no attention to the so-
cial and economic" situation in
the Ypsilanti area, stated Farness.
The p r o p o s e d incorporation,
would include an area of more
than 30 square miles.
A population of 22,000 and a
tax base of nearly $100,000,000
would make it one of the richest
per capita cities in Michigan, ac-
cording to Donald W. Howe,
chairman of the Ypsilanti Town-
ship Board's incorporation com-
mittee.
A special election sometime be-
fore April 1 is sought by township
officials.

expanding population is the man-
ner in which rural lands are being
developed for factories, highways,
airports, and flood control areas.
Superhighways are consuming land
at the rate of "60 acres to the run-
ning mile," he said.
Automobiles, Prof. Cain contin-
ued, demand a great portion of the
state's space. Extensive parking
space for cars are needed at home,
at work, when shopping, in addi-
tion to the broad ietwork of roads
used for transportation.
Large public recreation areas
exist in Michigan, "But we don't
know whether we have enough
state parks, public fishing sites.
hunting areas, forest camp
grounds, ski areas, beaches, and
underdeveloped wilderness areas,"
he added.
Unable to Forecast
Without sufficient data on natu-
ral resources, the state is unable
"to make sound forecasts of the
intensity of use to be expected at
given spots five or 10 years from
now, to say nothing of the time
when the next generation is look-
ing for a. place to go on the three-
day weekend or the two-week va-
cation," Prof. Cain said.
Group To Play
1 7th Century
Music Tonight
A string orchestra conducted by
Gilbert Ross will present a pro-
gram of Italian music of the 17th
and 18th centuries at 8:30 p.m.
tonight in Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
Included in the program will be
"Concerto Grosso in D Major" by
Corelli, "Sonata a tre con ripieni,
in G Minor" by Pergolesi, "Con-
certo Musicale in G Major, Opus
Six No. One" by Torelli, and
"Concerto in D Major from L'Es-
tro Armonico" by Vivaldi.
The orchestra is composed of
10 violins, three violas, three vio-
loncellos, one double bass, and
one harpsichord.

Maier Says
Size of 'U'
Cuts Morale
By THOMAS TURNER
The "bigness" of the University
is responsible for the most serious
morale problem among its stu-
dents, according to Prof. Norman
R. F: Maier of the psychology de-
partment.
He draws this conclusion from
studying a list of 19 suggestions
for improving morale, submitted
by a like number of-Tbuzz groups"
in his Human Relations course.
The 19 groups, each made up of
six students, discussed for half
an hour the question, "What is
the best thing that could be done
to increase student morale?"
Three Main Categories
Prof. Maier divided the 19 re-
plies into three main categories,
based on the basic need they rep-
resent.
Largest single area of concern
is the size of the University. Sug-
gestions for overcoming this ob-
stacle include a greater number
of all-campus activities, smaller
student problems by the adminis-
classes (more individual atten-
tion), increased recognition of
tration and reduction of threats
to insecurity.
Other Suggestions
Other group suggestions include
improvement of student govern-
ment by making it more represen-
tative and more responsbile, cen-
tralization of all student housing,
smaller classes and greater use of
discussion and participation tech-
niques, more informal class rela-
tionships, improve general stu-
dent-teacher relationships, im-
proved opportunities for socializ-
ing, more personal contact be-
tween students and administra-
tive bodies.
These solutions, in the words of
Prof. Maier, aim at "countering
the bad effects of a big univer-
sity."
Also of major Concern to the
participating students were the
twin issues of freedom and de-
mocracy.

Conference
Discusses
Student Aid
Failure to accept more of the
top 20 per cent of high school
graduating classes may be cost-
ing colleges many well qualified
students, Nicholas Schreiber of
Ann Arbor High School said yes-
terdayrat a national conference of
scholarship and financial aid of-
ficers here.
He explained, "I'm much more
concerned about the failure of
many students in the top 20 per
cent of their class to go to col-
lege than about the top one per
cent, who almost always receive
the recognition they deserve."
However, he said, there is schol-
arship aid for many of these stu-
dents but getting it depends large-
ly on local initiative.
"Basically," another delegate to
the convention said, "motivating
students to qualify and go on to
college is a long term job. Local
community leaders are often in
the best position. to know of really
deserving students who need fi-
nancial help and to give them the
encouragement they need to make
themselves known to colleges,"
To this end, it was revealed, lo-
cal organizations in New York
and Chicago are organizing schol-
arship funds that will enable stu-
dents who fail to qualify for top
national awards to go to college.

i i

DANCE AT THE UNION
FREE I
LITFIE CLUTI
DANCE
TONIGHT
9-12 UNION CAFETERIA

-Daily-David Arnold
LOW SPEED TUNNEL-Facilities of the new Aeronautical Lab-
oratory on North Campus include this tunnel. Air speeds between
zero and 175 miles per hour, with a very low turbulence level, can
be created to study the effects of gusts of air on wings.
Public To Inspect Buildings
At North Campus Showing

For the first time in its five-year
history, the University's North
Campus will be open for public
inspection, from the Ford Nuclear
Reactor to three of the married
students' apartments.
The open house will be held
from 2 until 4:30 p.m. on Sunday.
Bus transportation will be pro-
vided to and from the campus,
leaving the front of Alumni Me-
morial Hall at 2, 3, and 4 p.m., and
returning at 2:45, 3:45, and 4:45
p.m.
Buildings Open to Public
All buildings on the campus will
be open to the public with the ex-
ception of certain portions of the
Cooley Memorial Laboratory where
classified work is being done.
Students attending the open
house will be given the opportunity
of seeing the first nuclear reactor
in the state of Michigan and the
largest in the college field.
They will also be able to enter
one of the radiation "caves" where

irradiated material are studied be-
hind thick walls and windows.
Supersonic Wind Tunnels
In the aeronautical laboratory,
two supersonic wind tunnels and
one low-turbulence tunnel may be
seen in use. Personnel of the lab-
oratories will be on hand to answer
questions and explain the techni-
cal devices.
Outside this laboratory, six
empty railroad tank cars are
stacked together to provide a vac-
uum chamber which draws the air
through the wind tunnels.
Three apartment units will be
open to permit visitors to see the
modern housing facilities available
to engineers and their families at
Northwood Apartments.
Hi-Fi Reverberation Chamber
For the hi-fi enthusiast, a rever-
beration chamber in the Cooley
Memorial Laboratory will provide
one of the most interesting attrac-
tions.
Construction was begun on
North Campus in 1952, and the
value of the four laboratories, the
reactor, two service buildings andt
400 apartment units exceeds $11
million.
Faculty Group
T o Aid Labor
An Inter-University F a c u l t y
Council, enlisting 29 University
and Wayne State University fac-
ulty members has been formed by
the Institute of Labor and Indus-
trial Relations.
The council was set up to advise
and consult the Institute on the
content of its educational pro-
grams and research projects. Fur-
ther purpose of the council will be
to meet periodically with the Insti-
tute's labor and management ad-
visory committees.

Organization
Notices
(Use of this column for announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered student organi-
zations only.)
Baha'i Student Group, public meet-
ing, Oct. 18, 8:00 p.m., 725 S, Division.
Topic: Man, One .Family.
Congregational and Disciples Guild,
Homecoming Banner Project, Oct. 18,
7:30 p.m., Guild House.
Newman Club, Go Blue Dance, Oct.
18, 8:30 p.m., Newman Club.
Sociedad I-ispanica, "Carmen Ama-
ya" theater t rip to Detroit, Oct. 18.
Meet in front of Union at 6:30 p.m.
S4 .
Intercooperative Council, Football
Open House for Co-op alumni and
friends, Owen Co-op House, 1017 Oak-
land following homecoming game, Oct.
19, 4-6 p.m.
* * *
International Students' Association,
membership social and dance, Oct. 19,
8:00 p.m. Lane Hall basement.
* * *
Hillel Foundation, Friday evening
service, Oct. 17, 7:30 p.m., Hillel. Speak-
er: Dr. Jacobs, "Homecoming: Vignettes
from Jewish History."

CHILD GROWTH SYMPOSIUM:
Doctors Discuss Impact of Pregnancy

DAS Connects
Political Ideas
To Education'
The Detroit Area Study has
found a correlation between the
amount of education a person has
and how he feels about who
should run the country.
A part of the University's In-
stitute for Social Research and
sociology department, the study
pointed out that the more school-
ing a person has the more he is
inclined to feel that the man in
the street should have his fair
share in saying how the country
should be run.
In a "random sampling of resi-
dents of Oakland, Macomb and
Wayne counties,'it was found that
those interviewed who had fin-
ished their formal schooling by
the 11th grade were more likely
to feel that better informed Jber-
sons should have more say about
government than the average
man.
Political party affiliation did
not seem to affect the feelings of
those interviewed on this topic.

Tonight at 7 and 9:10 P.M.
"THE
CAINE MUTINY"
IN COLOR
with
H UMPH REY BOGART
JOSE FERRER
VAN JOHNSON
Saturday at 7 and 9:45 P.M.
Sunday at 8 P.M.
1 1- -
with
LAWRENCE OLIVIER
JEAN SIMMONS
-ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 cents

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12., "nunn,.W clmflflIT lVf

By DOROTHEA STEUDLE
In the advent of a new child,
the mother is affected the most
in that anxiety and insecurity oc-
currs, Henry Burks, orthopsychia-
trist, said yesterday in a sympo-
sium entitled, "Impact of Preg-
nancy on the Family."
The symposium on child growth
and development was part of a
conference for nurses and people
of allied professions. The confer-
ence will continue today.
Discussing how every member
of a family is affected by the
birth of a new child, an obstetri-
cian, an orthopsychiatrist, a par-
ent, a nurse and a nutritionist
gave their views from the stand-
point of their careers.
Mother's First Questions
A mother's first questions are,
"Is the baby going to be all
right?" and "Am I going to be a
good mother?" This is the process
in which she is really becoming a
woman,' Burks continued.
Education classes for women
with child were discussed. Mrs.
Alice Smith, nutritionist ,stressed

the importance of a nutritious
diet, while Dr. Samuel J. Behr-
man, obstetrician, maintained
that a mother should not gain
more than 20 nutritious pounds
for her sake and the baby's.
Preparation Helps
"A young girl prepared for
childbirth will withstand much
more than the unprepared moth-
er," Dr. Behrman said.
Psychiatrist Burks agreed but
said the woman will still feel in-
secure. He quoted a Harvard stu-
dy which showed that 80 per cent
of the expectant mothers resented
their pregnancy at one time or
other.
"We should learn to accept the
fact that people are going to feel
stress and strain. Our job is to ac-
cept this and to do what we can
to make it more acceptable and
understandable," Burks said.
The husband also is affected,
the symposium agreed. The dil-
emna of the husband as Burks
sees it, is that he feels left out. He
must change from his wife's little

child to a "Rock of Gibralter,"
for his wife to lean on.
Fear of losing his masculinity
while performing household tasks
troubles the father also. "In edu-
cation classes, have the husband
do what he can, not what he
ought to," Burks continued.
Although sibling rivalry is nat-
ural, the effect of the new baby
on other children of the family
usually makes them grow up since
mother is now preoccupied with
the new family member.
Symposium members agreed
that education and understanding
were essential for every family
member.

A

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.... ..as#;3%Eseams

Ending
Saturday

11 iE1 i

DIAL
NO 2-3136
her sins

Helen Morgan-her songs-
The real story from
real-life behind the glitter
of the girl they called
the Goddess of the Jazz Age!

First American Tour of Italy's
FrLORE NCE FESTIVAL
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
CARLO ZECCHI, Conductor
Thurs., Oct. 24, 8:30 P.M.
in HILL AUDITORIUM
PROGRAM
"ka Scala di Seta" . . . . . . . . . . Rossini
Symphony in D major \ , ... Cherubini
Sin*onia AmericanaF . . . . . . rancoMannina(
Suite from "La Pisanella" . . . . . . Pizzetti
Overture, "I Vespri Siciliani".. . " . . . Verdi
TICKETS: $3.50 --$3.00 - $2.50 - $2.00 - $1.50
at University Musical Society, Burton Memorial Tower

4t
:,

Ollie's Caravan
presents
IN CONCERT
ERROLL GARNER
TRIO

E LIGI BL E TO JOIN ?
DANC NG
Friday and Saturday Nights
V" W . Members and Guests;
CK.U] 314 East Liberty.
FLOOR SHOW TONIGHT Mary Lou
CLUB OPENS 11:30 A.M. FOOTBALL SATURDAYS.
FREE BUS SERVICE TO AND FROM STADIUM.
BUS LEAVES AT 1:00 P.M.

R9ENEO BROS.
ARING ANNOBLYTH PAUL NEWMAN-RICHARD CARLSON
. . . additional . . .
HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE LIFE OF
"QUEEN ELIZABETH II"
. . . Next Attraction .
"UNTIL THEY SAIL"

I.

94

NOW
Week Nights
At 7 and 9 P.M.

1

} DIAL
NO 8-6416
Sat. & Sun.
Cont. from 1 P.M.
0@ *
eed !"
-Newsweek

Today
and Saturday

AN

DIAL
NO 2-2513

qe thic 9dm l 'cetV
announces
180 SUBSCRIPTIONS OPEN FOR THE 1951-58 SERIES

"A Funny Picture
A Funny Race Ind

PLUS
BOB DETWILDER
Tentel
Tonight at 8:30

"Wild almost to the
point of hysteria!"
-N. Y. Post

That Double Rendezvous With Romance
V OST REFRESHING ESCAPADE THE STARS
OF ROME EVER
WINKED DOWN ONI
GREGORY PECK :
AUDREY HEPBURN
give you the happiest film time ever!
Shown at
2:45 6:40 10:00 A p
and

Oct. 21: DAY OF WRATH (dir. by Carl Drey-
er, Danish, 1943) ; and NOTES ON THE
PORT OF ST. FRANCIS (Frank Souf-
facher, U.S., 1947)
Nov. 4: M (dir, by Fritz Lang,German, 1930
-with Peter Lorre); and THE RIVER
(dir. by Pare Lorentz, U.S., 1937)
Nov. 18: MOTHER (dir. by V. 1. Pudovkin,
Russian, 1927) ; and CHESS FEVER (Pu-
dovkin, 1925)
Dec. 16: THE GREAT ADVENTURE (dir. by
Arne Sucksdorff, Swedish, 1955); and A
DAY IN THE COUNTRY (dir, by Renoir,
French, 1938)
J. 6. lITTP MENNERA W ;,.by

Feb. 24: LES ENFANTS DU PARADIS (dir. by
Carne, French, 1943 - with Jean-Louis
Barrault) -AT 7:30 P.M.
March 10: INTOLERANCE (dir. by D. W.
Griffith, U.S., 1 91 5- with Mae Marsh
and Lillian Gish)
March 31: QUAI DES BRUMES (dir. by Carne,
French. 1938 - with Jean Gabin and
Michele Morgan); and PARADE (by
Charles and Mary Eames, U.S., 1953)
April 28: FOOLISH WIVES (dir. by Erich von
Stroheim, U.S., 1922-with von Stroheim
and Mae Busch)

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"Brightly amusing...
it's all quite funny!"
-CUE Magazine

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