100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 13, 1957 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-10-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN RAILS'

ors, Administrators
puss Student Aid

ai

atves of 23 colleges
y of the nation's most
cholarship funds will
University tomorrow
y' to discuss financial
nts.
rence opens at 9 a.m.
the Union.
g Ten schools except
n will be represented,
all Michigan's state-
olleges except Michi-
and others including
ty of Chicago, Dart-
ge, Harvard Univer-
State Teachers Col-
University of Wash-
dy Workshop
to Ivan W. Parker,
an of men, the pro-
nsist largely of a study
ipolicies and methods
scholarship winners
vsis of student need.
.e educational -institu-
ined, delegates will be
a the Department of

tional Scholarship Fund for Negro
Students, National Merit scholar-
ships, and the George M. Pullman
and Alfred P. Sloan Foundations.
Studying the problem of figuring
a family's .ability to support a
college student, five groups of
participants will e a c h analyze
seven test applications, and a com-
parison will be made of methods
used.
To Consider Athletes
The Big Ten Aid to Athletes
Program will also be a topic of
discussion.
Prof. Marcus Plant of the Law.
School, the University's Big Ten
faculty representative, will outline
the development and philosophy
of the new program, which was
established to allow reasonable
financial support to athletes, not
according to athletic ability but
scholastic aptitude and financial
need.
The assembled educators and
administrators, will also discuss
aid to married students, scholar-
ships for foreign students, admin-
istration of loan funds and follow-
up of scholarship holders.,

Recommend
A A Suburb
A nnexation
Annexation of the Ann Arbor
Hills Subdivision has been recom.
mended by City Council's city-
township relations special com-
mittee in a report to the council.
Councilmen Clan Crawford, Jr.,
Charles W. Joiner, and Carl A.
Brauer, Jr., the members of the
committee suggested that the
council support any efforts by the
residents of the subdivision toward
annexation, in an effort to solve
the area's sewage disposal problem.
The subdivision, including ap-
proximately 164 acres just outside
the eastern city limits, now handles
its sewage on an individual-home
septic tank basis. Dr. Otto K. En-
gelke, county health .office, has
told residents of the subdivision
that "a multiple-type sewage col-
lection system, with proper treat-
ment, is the only solution."
The council's committee also
recommended in its just-published
report that in the event of annexa-
tion, sanitary sewer facilities
should be financed through special
assessments in the area and that
improvements should not be made
without the citizens' requests.

BY OVWD A. MARTIN
Associated Press Farm Reporter
WASHINGTON WP) - How well
off is the nation's agriculture?
This question is being argued by
groups having conflicting views on
whether the federal government
should do more or less to put
dollars into farmers' pockets. The
debate doubtless will be heard in
Congress when members again
tackle farm legislation at the com-
ing session.
The.controversy has been fed by
periodic reports of the Agriculture
Department that farm income is
rising in a recent document en-
titled "The Balance Sheet of Agri-
culture, 1957," issued by the Fed-
eral Reserve Board. This bulletin
said farm assets increased five per
cent during 1956.
Well off: Benson
Secretary' of Agriculture Ezra
Taft Benson, one of whose tasks is
to defend farm policies of the ad-
ministration, has been leading the
"pro" debating team on this issue.
Espousing the negative has been
James B. Patton, president of the
National Farmers Union, Herschel
Newsom, master of the National
Grange, and leaders of the newly
organized National Conference of
Commodity Organizations.
Benson pins much of his argu-
ment on the FRB bulletin relating
to farm assets.
Assets at Peak
"On Jan. 1, 1957," the bulletin
says, "the value of farm assets
reached a new peak of nearly 177
billion dollars, about five per cent
more than a year earlier."
These assets were listed as farm
lands and buildings, automobiles,
tractors, motor trucks, farm ma-
chinery and equipment, livestock,
crop inventories, household goods
and financial assets.
The bulletin said that most of
the increase in assets in 1956 was

in the value of farm lands. Of the
total increase of 8.6 billion dollars
in all assets, land accounted for
6.8 billion.
'NotdTrue Increase'
Newsom declares that this in-
crease in land values is not a true
increase because, he argues, farm-
ers owned no more land at the
start of 1957 than at the beginning
of 1956.
Newsome and others, who argue
that farmers are no better off this
year than last, if as well off, point
to the Federal Reserve bulletin
report on farm assets as reflected
in farm holdings of livestock. The
bulletin says these assets increased
4.7 per cent during 1956.
But the critics cite an Agricul-
ture Department report giving an
inventory of livestock on farms at
the beginning of the year. This
report states that at the beginning
of 1957 there were two per cent
fewer cattle, five per cent fewer
hogs, one per cent fewer sheep
and 9 per cent fewer horses and
mules on farms than a year earlier.
Only in the case of poultry was
there an increase.
Due to Inflation?
The increased valuation put on
livestock by the Federal Reserve
bulletin reflected higher market

BENSON ES. FARM GROUPS:
Prosperity of Agriculture in Dispute

prices for animals. Newsom says
the higher prices were due, in part,
to inflation.
The bulletin showed little differ-
ence in the values of crops held by
farmers at the beginning of this
year compared with a year ago. It
did show, however, that assets in
the form of machinery and motor
vehicles increased 3 per cent dur-
ing the year. Benson argues that
this fact shows a "definite" im-
provement in farm buying power.
The bulletin also showed that
farm assets in the form of cur-
rency and bank deposits changed
little, but that investment in U.S.
savings bonds ; increased 2.1 per
cent.
Benson reports that farmers
have only two dollars in debts for
each $100 of assets. But his critics
point to the Federal Reserve bul-
letin statement that the farm real
estate debt increased nine per cent
and non - real estate debts in-
creased one per cent during 1956.
wi
The Finest
Since 7850

E

the
Na-

the,

ILYO FFICIAL. BULLETIN

.__ :

. -----i

ued from Page 4)
nic Notices
igineering Faculty Meet-
. 21, 4:15 p.m., Aud. A;
1 examination for non-
s will be held in Room
r, East Medical Building,
at 8:00 a.m.
sting Program: Make-up
eshmen who missed any
Ade Tests given during
1 be held Tues. afid Wed.
15 and 16. Please report
t to 130 Business Admin-
Ing on Monroe St. Make-
'eign language placement
ng English, mathematics
y placement tests; or
it tests will not be giv-
er information call Ext.
Business Administration,
is, Natural Resources,
alth :
received marks of I, X or
the end of their last
immzer session of atten-
,eive a grade of "Ell in
courses unles this work
n. thp Sohool of Music
Oct. 17. In the Schools
iministration, Education,
rces and Public Healthi
rOct. 19. Students wish-
on of time beyond these
" to make up this work
>etition, addressed to the

appropriate official of their School,
with Room 1513,' Administration Build-
ing where it will be transmitted.
Seminar in Mathematical Statistics
Mon, Oct. 14 at 2 p.m. in 3209 A.H.
Prof. C. C. Craig will discuss the distri-
bution and frequency of record values.
Doctoral Examination for James E.
Cline, Physics; thesis: "Beta and Gam-
ma Decays from Some Odd-Odd, Self-
Conjugate Nuclei and Their Isobaric
Neighbors," Tues, Oct. 15, 2038 Ran-
dall Laboratory, at 3:00 p.m. Co-Chair-
men, P. R. Chagnon and R. W. Pidd.
Placement Notic s
The Los Angeles City School System
will interview in the following cities:
St. Louis, Missouri, Statler Hotel, Oct.

12 and 13; Chicago, Illinois, Conrad
Hilton Hotel, October 18, 19 and 20. .
Mr. William Baldwin, Personnel Ad-
ministrator, will be particularly in-
terested in meeting those who will be
finishing their teacher training this
semester or experienced teachers who
will be available. in February, 1958.
There is an active need for ele-
mentary teachers, all grades; high
school teachers in business education,
English, girl's physical education,
homemaking, industrial arts, mathe-
matics, science and social studies.
There is also a need for teachers of
the blind and teachers of the deaf at
all levels.
For any additional information con-
tact the Bureau of Appointments, 3528
Administration Building, NO 3-1511,
Ext. 489.

Take QUICKIE CHICKIE
to the game
NO 279944 for free delivery

OperatIons Research
is a challenging new field in vwhich research ranges
over every known area of science, to produce answers
to immediate questions, solutions for long-range
problems. Technical Operations, Incorporated, of
Burlington, Massachusetts, now engaged in such re-
'search in cooperation with the Continental Army
Command at Fort Monroe, Virginia, and at Monterey.
California, is looking for the right scientists and
engineers in all fields ...
and YOU as a TECHNICALRADAU TE
should know more about how tech/ops can offer you
broadening c ntact with many varied scientific dis-
ciplines, good living conditions, .salary policies that
mean growth and recognition, all usual benefits, and
creative freedom to think, in a growing research and
development organization.
See.Our Representatives.
K. S. ANDERSON, at the Placement Office, College
of Engineering, 347 West Engineering Building, O
tober 16 ... at the Bureau of Appointments, 3328
Administration Building, October 17.
write to: K. S. ANDERSSON
Cowbat Operations Research Group
Continental Army Command
Fort Mpnroe Virginia
or to: ROBERT L. KOLLER
ECHIAL OPmRATONS INmOORPORAyeD

Monroe Street

Across from the Law Quad

i

Ii! II

FEINER GLASS & PAINT CO.

/

216 W. William Street

Ann Arbor, Michigan

IIi

Telephone NO 8-8014

PUERTO'RICAN MEETING
FOR iNTERNATIONAL W/ORLD FAIR
Sunday, Oct. 13
A Meeting for All Puerto Rican Students
ENTERTAINMENT ROOM OF I.S.C.

We Have All Kinds of Glass-Mirrors and Furniture Tops
We Have-the Nationally Advertised Paints
YOU CAN PARK RIGHT IN FRONT OF OUR STORE
WE HAVE BEEN SERVING THE COMMUNITY FOR 67 YEARS

BUR NOT{ON, MASSACHULSEMT

0

Attendance will

be appreciated

Subscribe to The' Michigan Daily

r__1___ -II

I

,f

f

I

T

"American Foreign and Domestic Policy, 1957-58"

.

HILL

MONDAY

I

AUDITORIUM

I

OCTOBER 14th

8:30 P.M.

Admission

.1

25 cents

j,.

Snonsorad bv

II

- F .. i .

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan