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October 10, 1957 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Tl E MICHIGAN DAILY

SIZES SERVICES:
Ison Boosts Quality Education at U'
ICHAEL KRAFT -
ng the University has
n idea .. the concept
education," Lyle' Nel-'
discussing his new Job
f University relations y
nt to the president. r
vho came from a simi-
San Francisco State
replace Arthur Bran- '
d out that a univer-'
do this directly be-k
dvantages. of a center. .
earning are not appar-
y observers. Instead we
hasize the services that
imber of people, such
and medie." r
accomplished by the
niversity departments-
son's supervision, in-
formation and News
I special publications.
o acts as general co-
f various internal and Y.
blic relation functions
-present the Uniyersity {.

>blem
ealed

-Daily-Eric Arnold
LYLENELSON-New head of University relations and assistant to
the president says that the University must sell the concept of
quality education to the public by emphasizing service such as
research and medicine.

itch from San
was piob*.bly
chools that got
he stadium for
han for a' foot-
the soft-spok;En

/.

TI

public reV3ons expert who typed
his way from a college editorship
to his present position.
After earning his AB from the
University of Oregon in 1941
where he edited the student pa-
per, Nelson graduated to the edi-
torship -of the alumni publica-
tions.
Following a tour on the staff of
the Portland Oregon Journal and
as director of Oregon's News
Services, he finished the war
years as a technical editor for the
Armiy Ordinance Department.,
Returns to Oregon '
Joining the demilitarized trend

I

J

CARY

'

r.

Dial NO 2-3136
NOW.
BREAKS THROUGH' THE
FORBI DDEN BARRIER I

1

at the end of the war, Nelson
moved to the Bureau of Reclama-
tion. Then in 1947 he received a.
call from his alma mater and soon
found himself back at the. Univer-
sity of Oregon as assistant to the
president and'an associate profes-
sor in journalism.
Six years later, he came to Ann
Arbor to help establish the Edu-
cational Television and Radio
Center "which had five million
dollars in ,the bank but didn't
even own a paper clip." When he
left after two years to become as-
sistant to the president at San
Francisco, the Center had 14 em-
ployees.
Nelson .differs from those who
come to the University and miss
the closeness found among stu-
dent bodies in smaller schools.
San Francisco (enrollment 9200)
is a street car college and with the
faculty also living all over town,
it was a Job to even get them to-
gether for a dinner."
"Here, associations outside the
office are also with University
people. Perhaps that makes up for
size," he said.
Union Beg'ins
"Anne Fran'
Ticket Sale'
Tickets are now on sale for the,
Union theatre trip to see "Diary
of Anne Frank," according to
Frank Tranzow, '59E.
Tickets are $3.85 and are ob-
tainable from 3 to 5 p.m. Monday
through Friday in the Union Stu-
dent Offices.
The curtain will rise at 8:30
p.'m. Tuesday . in Detroit.' The
buses will leave at 6:45 p.m. from
the Union.
Future Union theatre trips in-
clude "Auntie Mame," "No Time
for Sergeants" and the Detroit
Symphony.

Expert Sees
For Teamst
There is "very little question"
that the Teamsters Union will be
expelled from -the AFL-CIO, a
University labor expert said Tues-
day.
Lawrence Rogin, director of La-
bor Education of the Institute of
Labor and Industrial Relations, a
joint program of the University
and Wayne State, pictured a long
but ultimately successful battle
against corruption in the labor
movement.
"In the long run labor can
'cleanse itself but the washing me-
chine will have to use a strong
bleach and many clothes will be
ruined in the process," he said.
Purge Ordered
The Teamsters Union is under
a directive issued Sept. 2i by the
AFL-CIO council ordering the
union to purge itself of corrupt
influences. Labor experts say this
means Jimmy Hoffa, who was
electedi Teamster president at its
recently ended convention.
"There will undoubtedly be
people inside the AFL-CIO who
will urge the Teamsters be re-
tained in the ranks because of
their size and importance. . But
George Meany (AFL-CIO presi-
dent) has committed himself too,
far to permit this," Login said.
Speaking before the Industrial
Relations Club, Login said he is
"discouraged" about new legis-
lation to cleanse labor of corrup-
tion, saying that present laws on
the books would do the job i-f they
were enforced.
Pressure Forces Cleanup
He added that this does not in-
clude legislation to allow kublic
accounting of labor and manage-
Organization
Notices
(Use of this column for announce-
ments of meetings is available to of-
ficially recognized and registered stu-
dent organizations only. For the cur-
rent semesterrorganizationsr hould
register not later than October 11.)
Congregational and Disciples Guild,
resource meeting on race relations, Oct.
10. 7:15 p.m., Guild House, 524 Thomp-
son.
Young Democratic Club, executive
board meeting, Oct. 10, 4:00 p.m., 2534
SAB.
Kappa Phi, regular meeting, Oct. 10,
7:15 p.m. Wesley Lounge, First Metho-
ist Church. Prospective pledges are
cordially invited.
Undergraduate Mathematics Club,
meeting, Oct. 10, 7:00 p.m., 3201 Angell
Hall. speaker: Prof. R. Bott. ,
The Episcopal Student Foundation,
luncheon at Canterbury House follow-
ing the 12:10 p.m. celebration of Holy
Communion at the church, Oct. 11, 218
Division.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

Expulsion
ers Union
ment welfare funds, which would
be good.
Public pressure, Login said, will
work to force unions to clean up
corruption. "The reason is that
the alternative to the labor move-
ment as it now operates is one
with a broader social philosophy,"
he said.
"Many people believe this is
what Walter Reuther represents.
Most' American businessmen fear
Reuther more than Hoffa because
of Reuther's views on social re-
form. Hoffa is the-kind of trade-
unionist that businessmen can
understand," Login said.
Although Hoffa may attempt to
make alliances among other un-
ions in the transportation indus-
try, Login said, he probably would
not use them to tie up the econ-
omy for fear of losing what con-
servative support he now pos-
sesses.
Artist Group
Holds exhibit
At Rackham
, r
The Ann Arbor Art Association
opened its 1957-58 season Mon-
day with a group exhibition en-
titled "Octet" a the. Rackham
Galleries.
A reception was held Tuesday to
introduce the show, which will run
through October 18.
"Octet" is the first of a series
of five exhibitions which the As-
sociation is planning for the cur-
rent season. All exhibitions are
open to the public.

The University, under a con-
tract with a United States govern-
ment agency, is helping increase
employment and productivity in
Japan.
The contract with the Interna-
tional Cooperation Association
provides for the Industrial Engi-
neering department here to es-
tablish an Institute for Research
in Productivity at Waseda Uni-
versity, Tokyo, according to Prof.
Wyeth Allen, chairman of the in-
dustrial and mechanical engineer-
ing departments.
Four Concentration Areas
Prof. Allen cites four major'
areas to be concentrated on: in-
dustrial engineering and manage-
ment practices, business and eco-
nomic surveys and management
practices, business and economic
surveys and forecasting, market-,
ing and sales promotion and
management studies and semin-
ars.
The program operates in two
ways: sending American teachers
to Japan and bringing Japanese
educators to this country. All ac-
tivity is financed by our govern-
ment through the ICA.
The first representatives of the
University sent to Japan were
Profs. Charles Gordy and Edward
Page of the industrial engineer-
tenor iTo Give
Music "Recital'
A faculty music recital will be
given by tenor Richard Miller at
8:30 p.m. today in Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre.

RECEIVES CONTRACT:

University Assists Japanese Industry

ELIGIBLE TO JOIN ?
DANCINGI
Friday and Saturday Nights
" " Members and Guests
Mary. Lou
314 EAST LIBE RTY
Air Conditioned

ing department, who will return
next July after several years at
Waseda. Their basic purpose was
to promote closer ties between
Japanese business and education.
Research Team Sent
Last summer an Operations Re-
search team consisting of Rich-
ard C. Wilson of the industrial
engineering department, Robert
E. Machol of the engineering re-
search institute, Prof. Max Wood-
bury of New York University and
Prof. George Feeney of Stanford
University was sent to Waseda.
Also this summer Prof. George
Elgis of the business administra-
tion school joined the University
faculty members teachipg at the
Japanese University, but unlike
the research team which was gone
only a few weeks, he will remain
until 1959.
A pair of Motion Time Methods

WILKI NSON

for
GAME
COMFORT

Mon. 9 to 8:30
Tues. thru Sat. 9 to 5:3
STUADI UM
SEAT

Relax ix perfect comfort on those
hard stadium benches with our
new folding stadium seat. Made of
tubular aluminum it has padded
seat and supporting back. Base
clamps securely to stadium bench.
Folds flat for easy carrying. In red
or blue duck.

$495

I

Another
Wilkinson First!

I

experts from Ann Arbor also sl
five weeks in Japan last sumt
Prof. James A. Gage of the
dustrial engineering departi
and Richard F. Stoll, sedretar
the MTM Association, held cla
for representatives of indu
and education.
Others To Be Sent
It is anticipated that fur
consultants will be sent to JE
before the contract expires in
ril, 1959, Prof. Allen says.
At the same time that An
can experts were being
abroad, Japanese professors
gan coming to the University
Two visitors arrived in A
1956, 11 more in September of
same year, three in Febr
1957, two in June, and nine
September. In addition, a nun
of Japanese have come for t
month visits,

_ .,.- ,

4

W.,.-IMMI

WIRE ..l M., rM .:-. W 4 IN.

"'TORERO' IS TERRIFIC . . .BETTER THAN ANYTHING
OF ITS SORT EVER DONE BEFORE!"-Crowther, N.Y. Times

The passionate fife
LUIS PROCUMAahuo of Luis Procuna,
ud thoi r ld's r art mrdd y
tMNW0.ETE wd CARLOS extaodhtIA

\\

STANLEY KRA?4ER'S
NUMENTAL FILMING OF
E PASSrol"
COLOR VISTAVIgION*
ShOWS at
- 3:30 -6:10 -8:55
st Feature at 9:12
SATURDAY.-
MAN WITH
THOUSAND

MICHIGAN M $1 9,
R4-BES ,. .. from .. .
Use Our .Lay-Away Plan or Charge It
Also Convenient 1.00 Weekly Budget Plan
Wilkinson Luggage hop.

Pa

HOWARD HUHES'
JOHN WAYNE JANiT LEIGH
U.S. AIR FORCE
TECHNICOLOR
... Next Attraction.
"3:10 to Yuma '

_ '

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DIAL NO 8-6416

Week Nights at 7 and 9 P.M.
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FINEST

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REVUE

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ind

Two
8-12

$1.50

Couple

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MAIZE AND BLUE NOTE
DANCE AT THE UNION
SATURDAY, OCT. 12

1'

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50 LEFT TO CHOOSE
FROM!

ALSO HAVE BIG LINE
OF ACCESSORIES!

BIKE SPECIAL $49.95

. 0

I

Includes:

4

j" three speed and handbrakes
k'fdynahub lighting unit
z.' book carrier
t_ (( !!-L- -.

John Shubeck
Wally Weber
Newt Loken

}

Terry Barr

Roger Zatcoff

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