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October 05, 1957 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-10-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


TAE MICIGAN DAILY SI _

TAKES SGC FLIGHT:
Former German. Compares U.S.
with Native Land After Recent Trip

COMMISSIONER DISCLOSES:
State Plans Highway Building Progra

-Daily-Norman Jacobs'
OWN SYRIAN BARRISTER: Adnan Zein is the former
general of the Liberal party, one of Syria's four main
artles,
n Student Deeares Nation
t Be Taken by Russians

Y JOHN AXE
not today, never has
never will be a com-
intry, nor a Russian
tion," Adnan Zein, for-
,ary-general of one of
major political parties,
received his law degree
University of Syria in
practiced law in Syria
ears and also served as
eneral of the Western
Association, is a per-
: of General Afif Bizri,
r of the Syrian army
. "strong man" of Syria.
king on Master's
ear-old attorney, who is
. his miaster's degree in
said that "the press of
i States has suddenly
good reason,, accused
being communist and
ward Russia and the
hould realize," he con-
iat Syria could never
rmmunist for religious,
nid economic reasons."
is married and the
wo children, elaborated
that the principles of
ni religion (80 per cent
Lans are Moslems) are
ly opposed to those of

of Russia's satellites and have no
alliance with the communists."
He vehemently denied reports
that Soviet troops or even techni-
cians might be in his country
teaching the Syrian army how to
use these weapons and emphasized
that the purchase Of these arms
was purely on a commercial basis
with no strings attached.
When asked about disturbing
reports of political upheaval and
intrigue, Zein, who maintains a
law office in both Damascus and
Lattakia, said "the only change
which has occurred in our country
was the resignation of one officer
"as head of the army and the suc-
cession of his immediate subordi-
nate to this position.".

By RICHARD SALO
"When I saw the cat and dog
fights between the British and
German planes over the English
Channel in World War I, I
thought I'd never go up in an air-
plane."
But William Born, tool and die
maker in the Plant Department,
did go up in an airplane. He and
his wife flew back to their home-
land, Germany, this past summer
on the Airflight to Europe, spon-
sored by Student Government
Council.
Born, who has been with the
University since he emigrated 28
yers ago, said he "greatly appre-
ciarted" the work SGC did in
sponsoring this flight and he
hopes that they will continue to
sponsor sucli flights.
Enjoys Trip
Contrary to previous trepida-
tion, about such a flight, Born
felt that it was one of the unfor-
gettable experiences of the trip.
The chartered flight ended in
Amsterdam and from there the
Borns took a train to Braunsch-
weigen, Germany, where they vis-
ited Mrs. Born's sister. Leaving
his wife with her sister, Born then
proceeded to visit the few mem-
bers of his family still living.
In Westphalia, he me .his sis-
ter and brother. His sister had
traveled from the eastern zone to
visit him as he did ;not want to go
into 'that zone even though his
home town, Bresslau, was located
there. From what little he could
learn from his sister, who was
very reticent, to talk, Born said
that things were "quite bad" in
the eastern zone.
htays in Zone
Born's father stayed in 'the
eastern zone even after his moth-
er had died in the early years of
World War II. He was known to
be living in 1945, but no one had
heard of him since the Russians
moved in.
Born's brother had been taken
prisoner by the Russians during
the war and shipped to Russia. As
soon as he became too sick to
work, the Russians shipped him
back to Germany.
When he arrived his wife barely
recognized him as he had become
so emaciated. Though he had lost
70 per cent of his hearing, he did
pick up a part time job to help
maintain his family.
On a steam ship cruise up the
Rhine 'river from Frankford-on
Mein, Born saw what he termed
"the most beautiful countryside
in the world," the Rhine river
valley.
A side trip into the Bavarian

fill "I

LANSING (A) - By mid-sum-
mer 1960, you'll be able to drive
from Detroit to Lake Michigan
along U.S.-12 withouttencounter-
ing an intersection, stop sign or
traffic light.
Highway Commissioner John C.
Mackie came up with this fore-
cast recently in disclosing details
of a gigantic, one-and-one-half-
billion dollar highway building
program.
U.S.-12 will be the first of a
system of four-lane limited access
highways to be opened to traffic,
Mackie said, giving the state its
first border-to-border s u p e r-
highway. All contracts on the
project should be let within a
year.
Plan Expressways
Other four-lane expressways
will run parallel to US-16 from
Detroit, around Lansing and
Grand Rapids to Muskegon, and

Come

to Church

--Daily-Norman Jacobs
BACK AT WORK-Operating a shaper in the Plant Department
is William Born, who recently returned from his first trip back to
Germany since he emigated. Born came to the University 28 years
ago=

.Sunday

from the Ohio border near Lake
Erie, west of Detroit to Bay City,
west to Clare and north to the
Straits and Sault St. Marie.
All these are part of the inter-
state network of highways, with
nine-tenths to be paid for with
federal funds and one-tenth with
state revenues.
Portions of all three roads have
been built or are under construc-
tion.
State to Pay
The state will pay for the big-
gest share of the other four-lanes,
through bond issues and normal
revenues.
These include completion of a
limited access highway along U.S.
27 to Clare, Northwestern High-
way running from Detroit,to the
Fenton-Clio Expressway south of
Flint and a highway from Detroit
to Port Huron. -.

Cost of completion for U.
from Ann Arbor to the Inc
border will run to nearly $121
lion, Mackie estimated.
Estimate Cost
The Ohio-Soo Expressway
cost another $193 million.'M
declined to estimate its cor
tion date.
Ninety million dollars wi
spent to complete U.S.-16, w
should be ready for traffic in
than five years, he' said.
He described his program
five-year project, but str
that it promises only lettin
contracts on all projects by
1962. Completion may take ar
er year or 18 months, he sa:
Mackie did not rule out the
sibility of a toll turnpike, po
in Southeastern Michigan
running along a north-
route west of Detroit.

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BU LrETIN
(Continued from "Pae 4})

Alps offered Born the opportunity
to climb a. 2,000 meter mountain
with his niece." "We didnr't climb,
anything higher because I'm not
as young as I used to be and I
never was an experienced climb-
er."
"We Americans never know how
lucky we are." . As illustrations,
Born pointed out that the aver-
age German housewife still buys
her food on a day to day basis in
small amounts because she does
not have the money to buy in
quantities and has no means of"
storing her food for lengths of
time.
The average worker must work
for an hour in order to buy a
pound of meat and for two hours
to buy a pound of butter, though
colored .margarine is available.
Surprise Friends
All of his friends were sur-
prised to hear that in America
most people own their own homes
and cars. In Germany most fami-
lies live in apartments of three
rooms and share a small foreign
car with at least one other family.
Traveling by train most of the
time to'see'the country, Born no-
ticed that there was very little
idle land. The government is
helping the farmers to purchase
machinery to help produce more
food.
Strong nationalistic feelings

still persist in Germany as the
people want unification and are
strongly anti-communist. Speak-
Ing of Chancellor_ Konrad Ade-
nauer's recent re-election, Born
said that the workingman was
not completely in favor of Ade-
nauer because they wanted unifi-
cation fast.
Back Adenauer
They would probably want to
try it by force except they have
been labeled the aggressor twice
and don't want it to happezi
again. The older people, however,
backed Adenauer because they re-
alized that he would not make
undesirable concessions 'to the
Russians.
The strongest reason for unifi-
cation is to reunite families brok-
en up by the division of Germany.
A family .very close to Born was
split in this manner. The parents
are in the western zone, one
daughter is in the eastern zone,
another daughter is in the United
States and the son is with the
United States army in Korea.
Most Germans remember how.
the Russians pillaged Germany
after the war. Born's brother, for
example, was the owner of a large
farm before the war. In 1945,he
had to stand humbly by and
watch his machinery, the product
of a lifetime of work, be labeled
and crated for shipment into Rus-
sia, or Poland.

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State & Huron Streets.
William C. Bennett, Pastor.
10:00 Sunday School
11:00 Morning Worship
5:45 Student Guild
7:00 Evening Service
Wednesday-7:30 p.m. Prayer Meeting.
WE WELCOME YOU!

I

Room 207, Economics Building
Thurs., Oct. 17, at 3:15 p.m.

on

only this,"' he continued,
standard of living is high-
'ia than in any other Medi-
in country, with the poor-
Drers learning five Syrian
a day which is the equiva.
$3.50 in American dollars
al to the buying power of
ars in the United States."
Believes in Freedom
whose father was president
Supreme Court, of Syria,
ria's love of ,its freedom,'
t too many years before,
ever allow it to surrender
grity and independence to
as the American press re-
>aid much too high a price
an sacrifice and lives 'to
t which is dearest to us,"
d,
questioned about why the
government had purchased
ipments of arms from Red
lovakia, 'he remembered
ria had "tried in vain for
ars to purchase arms from
itain and France and fin-
ned to the communist bloc
ins as a last resort."
Draws Comparison
yIng this action even fur-
drew a comparison with
sian alliances which both
and the United States had
World War II. "We have
purchased arms from, one

Law School Admission Test: Appli-
cation blanks for the Law School Ad-;
mission Tests are now available at 122
Rackham Building. Application blanks
for the Nov. 9, 1957 administration
must be received in Princeton, New
Jersey not later than Oct. 26, 1957.
Interdepartmental Seminar on Ap-
plied Meteorology: Engineering. Mon.,
Oct. 7, 4:00 p.m., Room 307, West En-
gineering' Building. Donald B. Turner
will speak on "Aerodynamic Downwash
of stack oases niar industrial Plants."
Chairman: ┬░Prof.' F. K. Boutwoll.

Placement Notices
Personnel Requests:
United Airlines Inc., Chicago; IlI., is
Interested in talking to any college
graduates in non-technical fields and
in Engineers.
State Mutual Life Assurance ,Co.,
Worcester, Mass., needs Underwriters,
Group Insurance ,Consultants, Claim
Examinera, Accountants, Statisticians,
and Actuaries..
Chrysler Corp., Centerline, Mich., has
an opening for a Market Analyst for
Research Inplanaing of marketing
areas. Requires a man with a B.A.,
B.B.A., or M.B.A. and with 1-2 years
of experience.
Associates.Investment Co., South
Bend, Ind., wants an Attorney for the
Saginaw office, working with deficien-
cy accounts of the Automobile Finance
SAfro-American Life Insurance Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla., needs Accountants
and Actuaries.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin.,
ext. 3371..
Personnel Interviews: State Dept.
In addition to the interview being
held on Tues., Oct. 8, during the day,
anyone interested in the State Dept.
may. also attend a group meeting at
4:00.

now accepting

CONTRI BUTIONS

THE THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY IN
ANN ARBOR
Clew Quarters: 106 East Liberty, 2ND FLOOR
Listen to Radio Theosophy: Sundays, 12:15 P.M.
WPAG (1050 kc)
PRESBYTERIAN STUDENT CENTER
at the FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1412 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
Rev. William S. Baker, Campus Minister
Miss Patricia Pickett, Assistant ,
Sunday Morning Worship at 9:00, 10:30, and
12:00. World-Wide Communion.
Rev. Henry Kuizenga, Minister of the Church.
Seminars: "The Sermon on the Mount" and "The
Significance of the Church" at 10:30.
Student Center Coffee Break from 11:3)-12:00.
Sunday Evening Supper at 5:45 p.m.
Worship and Forum at 7:00 p.m. Miss Amber Van
speaking on "The World at Your Doorstep."
Mid-week Vespers at 5:10 p.m. Wednesday, with
coffee-break preceding.
Grad supper and discussion at 6:15 p.m. Friday.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. Sunday Mornin'g Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday, Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street. Reading room hours are: Mn-
day 11:00 A.M. to 8:30 P.A. Tuesday - Sat-
urday 11:00 A.M. to 5 P.M. Sunday 2:30 to
4:30 P.M.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Rev. Leonard A. Parr, Minister.
Church School and Nursery 10:45 A.M.
At 10:45 Dr. Leonard A. Parr will preach on
"The-Pathos of the Familiar."
4:00 P.M. Congregational meeting in Pilgrim
Hall.
7:00 P.M. The Student Guild will meet in the
Mayflower Room. ,A new film' "The Broken
Mask" will be presented.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and, the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and sermon followed
by breakfast and, discussion in Canterbury
House.
11:00 P.M. Morning prayer and sermon.
4:30 P.M. Graduate Canterbury.
5:30 P.M. Canterbury Evensong in Chapel.
6:00 P.M. Canterbury buffet supper.
7:00 P.M. Speaker, Reverend.Doctor Henry Lew-
is, Rector, Topic, "Offences in the Worship of
the Episcopal Church."
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister.
9:45 A.M. Church School.
10:45 A.M. World Wide Communion Observance.
The CONGREGATIONAL and DISCIPLES
STUDENT GUILD
524 Thompson Street
J. Edgar Edwards, Director
Donna Hamilton, Associate
7:00 P.M. At ,.the Congregational Church the
Student Guild will see a dynamic new film
which confronts every person with the world's
most pressing issue.
Tuesday, October 8, 4:30-6:00 P.M. Weekly cof-
fee break at Guild House, 524 Thompson. All
students welcome.
CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1131 Church St.
Dr. E. H. Palmer, Minister

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Dr. Chester H. Loucks, Minister
Mrs. Beth Mahone, Assistant Student
Counsellor
9:45 Church School.
11:00 Morning Worship (World Communion Sun-
day) Sermon "Nehemiah, a Dedicated Lay-
man."
6:00 The Roger Williams Fellowship will meet
in the Chapman Room of the First Baptist
Church for a snack and recreation hour. Fol-
lowed at 7:00 by Rev. Dwight Anderson, Min-
ister of the North Side Baptist Church, direct-
ing discussion on "From Confusion to Con-
viction."
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
and STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri .Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Ronald L. Johnstone, Vicar
Saturday, 4:15 to 5:30: Open House after the
Game.
Sunday at 9:15' and at 10:45: Services, with ser-
mon by the vicar, "Strengthened to Know the
Love of Christ."
Sunday at 9:15 and 10:45: Bible Study Groups.
Sunday at 12:30: Grad and Staff Group leaves for
Dinner and Outing.
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper and Program: Candlelight Cere-
mony receiving new members into Gamma
Delta.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill at S. Forest
Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor.,
Sunday--
9:00 & 11:00 A.M. Worship Services.
10:00 A.M. Bible Study-Gospel of Mark.
6:00 P.M. Supper.
7:00 P.M. Miss Nancy Matfson, Speaker.
'(Lutheran Student Study Group in Europe."-
-Slides.
Tuesday-
7:15 P.M. "Influence of Classical Culture on
Christendom"-Dr. Bruno Meineche. Class
open to all students.
Thursday-
9:30 P.M. Vespers.
Friday, 8:00 P.M. Married Students Group.
CAMPUS CHAPEL

frA

in

(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Chur
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Direttor
Res. Ph. NO 5-2665; Office Ph. NO 8-7

421

NBC OPERA
COMPANY
Concert version in English, of
THE MARRIAGE
OF FIGARO
at the first concert of the
EXTRA CONCERT SERIES
in Hill Auditorium
Sun., Oct. 6, 8:30 P.M.

fictilon'
poetry
essay
music

10:00 Morning Service.
7:00 Evening $ervices
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
SUNAYS:'10:00, 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.
WEDNESDAYS: 7:30 P.M.
L. C. Utley, Minister:
Television: Sundays, 2:30 P.M., Channel 6, Lan-
sing.
Radio: Sundays 5:30 P.M., WXYZ 1270.
For transportation to services Dial NO 3-8273.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL &
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South ,Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Herbert R. Lowe, Student Assistant Pastor.
SUNDAY PROGRAM
9:45 A.M. Discussion and Coffee Hour.
10:45 A.M. Worship Service.
7:00 P.M. Student Fellowship Program-"Reli-
gion and the Arts: Music.". Robert Preston,
School of Music.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenow
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10 A.M. Unitarian Church School.
Unitarian Adult Group. Topic: "Unitarian Af-
firmations."
11 A.M. Services: Rev. Edward H. Redman preach-
ing on: "Retracing Old Testament Footsteps."
7 P.M. Unitarian Student Group. Business Ses-
sion-Square Dancing.

art

photography

GENERATION MAGAZINE.

FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING

I

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