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October 04, 1957 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-10-04

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THE ICIIGAN DAILY

N

Al LY

OFFICIAL

BULLETIN

tinued from Page 4)
of speaker by the Commit-
Iversity Lectures:.
r9: Homecoming Dance, Un-
, I-M Sports Build4ng, 9-1.
: A motion providing that
Lye Committee write a letter
propriate people expressing
f girl cheerleaders. Yes, 12;
abstention.
lTwo delegates to be sent
rference on Student Travel
be held in New York on
11 and - appropriated $150
xpenses.
All-Campus Election Rules
action with amendments.
ed: Committee to study and
n what should. make up the
idates supplement in The
Daily, including content of
yns directed to candidates.
ittee is to report at the
October 9.
Delineation of campus
recommended by Campus
d with amendments to in-
State Street and South Uni-
pping areas. Boundaries are
the North by Huron and
ae West by Maynard to E.
Division on the South by
red Hill Street and on the
orest and Observatory.
d: Audrey Cook as Office
emic Notices
Exam for Masters Degree
Oct. 18, 4:00-5:00 p.m.,
Mason Hall, Dictionaries
ed. Sign the list posted in
Ofice, 3001 Haven Hall.
y Colloquium: "Hypotheses
in the Process of Solving a
sk." Dr. Anatol Rapoport,
*th Research Institute. 4:15
Oct. 4, Aud. B., Angell Hall.
S e mi n a r organizational
Room 270, West Engineering
7 at 4:00 p.m.,
minar: The topic for the
ill be "Decision Procedures
ogic of Algebra." Meetings-
y at 4:00 p.m. in 3010 Angell
meeting Fri., Oct. 4, with
Lyndon of the Department
atics speaking.
rtmental Seminar on Ap-
orology: Engineering. Mon.,
p.m., Room 307, West En-
luilding. Donald B. Turner
>n "Aerodynamic Downwash
tees near Industrial Plants."
Prof. F. K. Boutwell.
asion Service announces the
ass to be held in Ann Arbor
Mori., Oct/. 7:
Transport Management:
70 School of Business Ad-
t. Ten three-hour weekly
'.00. Professor John 'C. Kohl
r William E. Cox, Jr., in-
on for this class. may be
Lb Extension Service office
htenaw Avenue during Uni-
,e hours or in Room 184 of
of Business Administra-
of Monroe and Tappan,
to 9:30 p.m. the night of'

lie Administration, Business Adminis-
tration, Economics, History, Political
Science, Language Studies, Geography.
and International Affairs for Careers
in Foreign Service. The Foreign Service
examination will be given sometime in
December. Watch the DOB 'column of
The Michigan Daily for kpplications.
Note: As of the filing date for exam-
ination the applicant plans to take, he
should be at least 20 and under 31
years of age, and an American citizen.
Applicants if married must be married,
to an American citizen. Candidates for
the Foreign Servicelshould understand
that they must be willing to accept 's-
signment to any post.
Fri., Oct. 11
Mead, Johnson and Company, Evans-
ville, Indiana. This is a well established
50 year old company manufacturing
pharmaceutical and nutritional prod-
ucts with annual sales of 80 millron,
Characterized by rapid domestic growth,
and opening of additional foreign man-
ufacturing subsidiaries. Graduates -
February, June and August. AMen with
BS in Biology or Pre-Medical for Sales
(Medical Detailing). Professional con-
tacts with Physicians.
Koehring Company, Milwaukee, Wis-
consin. Manufacturer of Construction
Equipment. Graduates -- February or
June. Men with degrees in Liberal Arts
for Training Program in field of Con-
struction or Manufacturing of Con-
struction Equipment. This is an inte-
grated program of approximately 8
months and serves to familiarize grad-
uates with manydepartmental ti-
vities. At the end of this program, they
are then assigned to an operating de-"
partment,
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin-
Istration Building, Ext. 3371. Appoint-
ments should be made by 4 p.m. of
the day prior to the scheduled inter-
view. Please be prompt for your ap-
pointments!
Representatives from the following,
will be at the Engrg. School:
-Thurs., Oct.. 10
Abbott Lab,, N. Chicago, Ill. - all
levels in Chem. E., Mech., B.S, and M.S.
In Industrial j or Research and Devel-
opment, Design and Production..
Corning Glass Works, Albion, Mich.
-all levels in Chem., Civil., Elect., Ind.,
Instr., Mat'ls., Math., Mech., Eng. Mech.,
Physics and Science for Research, Dev,,
Design, Production and Sales.
Mead, Johnson and Co., Evansville,
Ind. - B.S. and M.S. in Chem:, Elect.,
Ind. and Mech. for Dev., Design, and
other fields.
Nat'l Lead Ca., Titanium Div., South
Amboy, N.,. -- all levels in Chen. and
Met. for Research and Dev.
Fri., Oct. 11
Koehring Co., Milwaukee, Wis. - B.S.
and M.S. in Civil or Mechi. i. for vari-
ous programs.
ERI, U of M., Willow Run, Mich. --
all levels i Elect., Ind., E. Mat., Math.,
Instr., and Physicb for Research; and
Development.
For appointments contact the Engrg
Placement Office, 347 W.E., ext. 2182,
Summer Placement Services
The following companies will inter-
view at the Engrg. School for summer
employees as well as for regular:
Mon., Oct. 7 ,l
Great Lakes Steel, Nat'l Lead, Detroit,
Mich. - B.8. in Chem. E., Civil, Elect.,
Ind.,Mat'ls, Mq hMetal, and Engrg.,
Mech.
P.R. Mallory & Co., Indianapolis, Tad.
--all levels in Elect, and Metal.
Tues., Oct. 8
Surface Combustion, Toledo, Ohio-
B.S. In Chem. E., Civil, Elect, Metal.,

Mech., and E. Math.
Thurs., }Oct. 10i
Abbot Lab., X. Chicago, Ill. - See
the above notice under regular inter-
views.
For appointments contect the Engrg.
School.
.Special Advanced Study Opportunity
Notice:I
The Ford Foundation is offering fel-
lowships for the academic year 1958-59
for study and research on foreign areas
and affairs. These are available to
seniors and grad. students, faculty
members, and to persons interested who
have their doctorates. People in law,
so. studies, humanities and Intrnat'l
rel. are invited too apply. Work should
pertain to Africa, Asia, the Near East
Soviet Union or Eastern Europe. Study
and research may be undertaken as
early as summer, 1958. Intormation is
available at. the 'Bureau of Appoint-
ments, 3528 Admin. Bldg., ext. 3371.
Registration Notice:

Meetings will be held Tues., Oct. 8,
at 3 o'clock and at 4 o'clock, in Aud.
A of Angell Hall, for students interested
in registering with the Bureau of Ap-
pointments in either the General or
the Teaching Division. Each meeting
is open to all students, who may come
at the time most convenient for them.
The General Division includes posi-
tions in Science and Research, Business
and Industry, Government, and Social
Work. The Education Division includes
all levels of Elem., High School, and
Collegg teaching and administrative
positions.
Since employment interviews begin
during the week of Oct. 8, it is urged
that students take blanks at this time
and return them as soon as possible so
that we will have records to give to
interviewers.
Men who are facig military service
after graduation are also urged to
register and are encouraged to talk to
interviewers with an eye to employ-
ment after separation from service.

Expansion
Plan Proposed
At Amherst
AMHERST, Mass. - A special
alumni committee at Aniherst Col-
lege issued a five proposal report
recently aimed at meeting the
approaching expansion crisis.
The five-point plan included re-
ducing time required for gradua-
tion for gifted students and ad-
mitting gifted students to the
liberal arts college with advanced
credit. The committee agreed that
the four-year plan is not neces-
sarily best for all students and
that both of these schemes would
free some space for additional
students.
The committee also advocated
lengthening the academic year to
make better use of physical facili-
ties which are now idle part of the
year.

People taking trips 'generally de-
cide to travel by automobile, ac-
cording to a report released by the
University Survey Research Cen-
ter.
The complete report, based on a
study done for the Travel Research
Association, the Port of New York
Authority, and the New York Cen-
tral railroad, is available as "The
Travel Market: 1955," published
by The Institute for Social Re-
search.
In the report, authors John B.
Lansing and Ernest Lillienstein
tate that the average person takes
at least one long trip by car each
year.
Reasons for Travel
Reasons given by those inter-
viewed for the overwhelming pref-
erence include: inexpensiveness,

freedom to choose own route and
timing, -speed and directness, en-
Joyment of scenery.
Other reasons include use of the
car on arrival, ease of transporting
luggage, and "just plain enjoy-
ment, comfort and pleasure."
The on1ly disadvantage given was
fatigue, and this was listed by only
three per cent of those who trav-

U' RESEARCH STUDY:

Vacationers Prefer Auto Travel

family income is less than 4
per year took one-fifth as n
trips as other families did.
Professional and manag
workers are more likely (7(
cent) to have traveled -at
once on a long motor trip in
past year, with clerical and
workers also above average.
Housewives, students, labi
and farmers tend to travel in

less.

In comparison, nearly half
named economy as a reason for
using the car.
Correlation between car travel
on one hand and income and occu-
pation on the other was noted.
Trips Depend on Income
Though almost all American
adults have been 100 miles from
home on auto trips, those whose

International

The International Cent
give a reception-dance for:
students at 8 p.m. tonight
Union Ballroom.
Music will be played by I
Rot's band. Punch will be

hom.onauo tip,, those, whose

I E

/

For the Finest in Dining -

I

Restaurants You Will Enjoy

'OLD GERMAN RESTAURANT
ANN ARBOR'S FINEST,
FINEST IN MUSIC IND FINEST IN FOOD
TAKE-OUT DINNERS
Select from our entire Menu
OPEN FROM 11 A.M. to 12 P.M.
With meals served until 8 P.M. - Closed Thursday
PHONE NO 2-0737

rs
X9.

LUNCH and DINNERS Fine Salads & Sandwiches
FAMOUS FOR ROAST BEEF
Serving your favorite Beer, Wines and Champagne-
Pizza Pie Seed After 8:00 P.M.
Open From 11 A.M. to 11 P.M.
2045'PACKARD NO 2-1661
Catering at Your Home or Hall Henry Turner, Prop.

i ,.

COCKTAILS' and DINNERS
CATERING TO UNIVERSITY PEOPLE
SINCE 1920

When Important People come to town
.}. highlight their visit with luncheon or dinner at the
Corner House -where food, service and surroundings
meet your every wish. Tuesday through Saturday, 11:30
to 2:00 and 5:00 to 7:00. Sunday: Dinner, 12:00 to
3:00.,May we suggest that you
telephone for reservations?
Vike ('orner JbNo~el
S. Thayer at Washington in Ann Arbor
A block west of Rackham Bldg.--NO 8-6056
FAMOUS FROM COAST TO COAST
Newest, Most Modern Cocktal Lounge
In Washtenaw and Wayne Countya
SEVEN SA
RESTAURANT
- 1435 E. Michigan - Ypsilanti - Phone HU 3-2840
Cocktails * Beer * Wine * Iiquo]
Specializing In .. . BROASTER CHICKEN,
Genuine Rocky Mountain RAINBOW TROUT
''In All The World There Are No Finer"
Come out and enjoy your favorite dinner, luncheon or snack.
Open 10:004A.M. to 2:00 A.M.
(CLOSED TUESDAYS)
We Serve a BUSINESSMEN'S LUNCH
i ' BACKGROUND MUSIC -by MUSAC

theaical Statistics
3p.m. in Room 3209,
ussain of Decca Uni-
will discuss some of
be design of experi-

1

Read

Three Miles]

East of Ypsi on Michigan Ave.
Closed Sunday

Notices

will be in-
beginning

in our o
8, 1957.
r A

Daily
Classifieds

LEO
PING

For anr

a
I p p l 1/ I YI I I 1 1. II rlli i ll li il r

F State, Washington,
February and June,
with 'degreeif In Pub-,

Exotic Treat

IZZA

at 'ed.

Our chefs are ready to prepare the most delicious food
for your enjoyment.
Vou. will be served the finest in
Cantonese and American food

TAKE-OUT ORDERS ANY TIME

I

IiiZM07 I

TASTE THE
DIFFERENCE!

Closed aewdoV
LEO PING
118 West Liberty
Ph.ne NO 2-5624

I.

.)

Specially prepared by chefs
with the flavor, tenderness,
and zest of native Italy.

THOMPSON'S RESTAURANT

* Plenty of Parking Space
*r Open 'till 12:00 P.M.

* PIZZA TO GO
Phone NO 31683

t

,.
... .. . . . . ....rte.
t = i

1dwweu4 91P?lhie 1:g
takes pleasure in announcing
an addition to their menu
of fine foods

015 Eat N a omn t
0 15 East Ann -- Near Women's Dormitories

-

I

For A Delicious Dinner
in Ann Arbor
Dine at WEBER'S

Iti

You'll Like our Big Selection
100 BIKES
You'll Like our Low Prices

To help you cut the

r PIZ

J

- r
...
,
" ''
,,per
l

High Cost of Living

. . .

We are

ON DISPLAY

ROYCE UNION
ROBIN HOOD
RALEIGH
ROLLFAST
COLSON

IMPORTED
BICYCLES
$'; 1;95

now offering
a Fast, Low-Cost

will be served daily
from 11 A.M. to 1 A.M.
in' our new dining orom
"THE DUCHESS ROOM"
Expertly prepared by our special pizza pie maker and

Delleious
STEAK, CHICKEN,
SEAFOOD
-- - - - " 1

I

Your Favorite
BEER, WINE,
and

Self-Serve

FROM II A.M. 'TIL 9:00 P.M. t

1

I

'El

I IN MS CHL U IIAMPAGNEUurIII

11

i t i

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