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October 02, 1957 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-10-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TAE MICHIGAN DAILY 1

THIK:
ents Indian Students in U.S.'

U' Pl ans
Dearborn.
Co-op Work

[ILIP MUNCK
Pathik, Spec., of the
versity in India, 'is
the University stu-
3. in the United States.
t the University under
Student Leadership
he United States Na-
its Association.
to "study and to learn
a's social system and
American life."
Culture Commission
?athik was the chair-
cultural commission
al Union of Students
'oup corresponding to
nen of the -four other
nd the executive OI
USI are elected once
hie presidents of the
ernments of Indian
Pathik is the presi-
tudent council of the
ersity.
ersity from which I
centralized as your
a the United States,"
. There are 100 col-
unjab University.
ademic Ranking
n'6llment of the uni-
out 100,000. Of these
hik had the top aca-
g last year for which
t special federal gov-
it scholarship.
dual colleges in the
e all similar, Pathik
e is in the Gandhi
bional College in Am-
e does not give its
gree. Every two years

-Daily-Bud Bentley
LEADERSHIP STUDENT-Virendra Pathik, of the Punjab Uni-
versity, Is the Foreign Leadership Program Student from India.

Center
S Data
bility
ut of every five
es, moves during
according to a
yesterday by the
ly.
special research
niversity's Survey
r, published the
a of a statement
S director Harry

report, based on the latest
ble census data, analyzes the
of people who move. It is
d "Residential Mobility,
0, in the Ten Largest Metro-
n Areas of the U.S."
erally the 'report indicates
r movement in the Western
ranging from 8.5 per cent
tropolitan. New York to 24.1
nt in Los Angeles and San
,isco.
the other hand, in each of
reas covered, young adults
far the most mobile group.
over 29 move much less than'
from 40 to 54, the latter be-
ss than half as active as the
in their 20's.
,p found married persons:
slightly more than others,
o distinction can be made in
ring the mobility of those,
rried, divorced and widowed.
re is, however, a clear cor-
n between mobility and in-
as family income increases
g decreases.
ailed study of Los Angeles,
t, Boston, San Francisco,
urgh, and Cleveland dis-
that one of five families
noved came from another.
unity or state, and that those
g in from outside areas are
er, on the average, than
changing residence within
me city.
DIAL NO 8-6416
Ends Tonight...

longs. On the basis of these exami-
nations, a degree is conferred.
At Punjab, Pathik was taking
an English honors course. At the
University he is studying politics
and American studies. Hie ex-
plained that his primary purpose is
not academic, but rather to learn
about and participate in campus
activities.
Pathik was quite active in poli-
tics and student activities in India.
He edited the "Voice of Students,"
a monthly intercollegiate magazine.
which, he explained, was to voice
the "opinions and aspirations of
university students."
"One of the most important
events in my life was when I par-
ticipated in the Goa Satyagrah,"
he said. Satyagrah is the technique
of passive resistance invented by'
Mahatma Gandhi.
Asks Liberation
Pathik and 71 other students
walked into the Portuguese colony
of Goa in September of 195Q to
ask for the liberation of the people
there.,
When they made their re-
quest," he said, "they beat us until
we became unconscious. Then they'
drove us to the border and threw
us out of the colony."
"I witnessed with my own eyes,"
he continued, "the atrocities per-
petrated by the Portuguese on the
harmlessnsoldiers of a peaceful
movement.",
Ford Donates l1oney
Explaining the foreign student
leadership program, Pathik said,
"A large sum of money has been
donated by the Ford Foundation
to the USNSA to sponsor this pro-
fect under which student leaders
r t t h PflT o C o n s id e r ..
'Predicament'
Prof. H. C. Allen, Commonwealth
Fund Professor of American His-
tory, University of London, will
speak tomorrow at 4:15 p.m. in
Auditorium A, Angell Hall.
The lecture, "The British Pre-
dicament," is under the auspices
of the history department.
Prof. Allen is presently on a
six-month grant as visiting re-
searchprofessor at the University
of Virginia.
He is the joint editor, with C. P.
Hill, of "British Essays in Ameri-
can History," published this year
on the 350th anniversary of the
founding of Jamestown.
He is also the author of "Great
Britain and the U.S.-the History
of Anglo-4merican Relations from
1783-1952;"

from Asia, Africa and Latin Amer-
ica are invited to study and learn
about the United States." Sixteen
students. from different countries
are visiting in the United States
this year.
To qualify for the program, the
foreign student should be 18 to 22
years old, have two years left of
college, have expetience with stu-
dent activities in their own uni-
versities, be familiar with' their
country and have. above average
academic averages.
"The role of student government
in Punjab is somewhat different
than most student governments
here," he said. "The student gov-
ernment organizes all activities on
campus such as collegiate, inter-
collegiate athletic competition, and
local and intercollegiate debates,
declamation contests, poetical
symposiums and story writing
competitions, to mention a few."
Psyeholo gst
Coimended-
For Efforts
Prof. Daniel Katz of the psy-
chology department was cited this
week for "outstanding contribu-
tions in research, writing, and
teaching in the field of psychol-
ogy," by the University of Buffalo.
The honor was bestowed follow-
ing a residence hall dedication
that was part of the City of Buf-
falo's 125th anniversary celebra-
tion which highlighted Education
Day activities.
Ay former alumnus of the Uni-
versity of Buffalo, he received his
B.A. degree there in 1925. After
earning his M.A. and. Ph.D. de-
greesat Syracuse University; Katz
came to the University in 1947 as
professor of psychology and pro-
grami director of the Survey Fe-
search Center.
The citation commends Katz as,
"A brilliant and early scholar in
the challenging field of psycholo-
gy, he gave forceful .and far-
sighted leadership to departments
of psychology at Princeton Uni-
versity, Brooklyn College, and the
University of Michigan."
During World War II he was
appointed as Research Director of
the Surveys Division of the Office
of War Information. Katz has sat
on the editorial board of "Public
Opinion Quarterly" in addition to
writing several books in the field
of social psychology. He recently
edited "Public Opinion and Prop-
aganda," an information service
which prints selections of Ameri-
can scholars in public opinion
subJects.

Industry is showing "excellent
response to the University's plans
for a Dearborn Branch coopera-
tive program," University Vice
president William E. Stirton said
yesterday.
"What we've been attempting.
to do is broaden the base of in-
dustrial participation in the pro-
gram. Many inquiries have been
received and much interest has
been shown by companies of all
sizes," he said.
Under 'the program which will'
be instituted when the Dearborn
College opens up in two years,
students will al tern ate! three
months of class with three months
of on-the-job training.
Details Worked Out
Details of the program are still
being worked out, Stirton 'said,
but efforts are being made to re-
late-classes and jobs as closely as
possible.
Each job description will ii-
elude prerequisites needed, 'such
as calculus or chemistry, and thus
a student can progress in jobs as
well as classes.
Stirton said most of the stu-
dents in the cooperative program
will probably be engineers, but
similar on-the-job training pro-
grams are d e f i n i t e l y being
planned for business administra-
tion students. A comparative pro-
gram for the literature, science
and arts section of the Dearborn
branch "is still being discussed"
according to Stirton.
No Repetitive Jobs
To emphasize the use of on-
the-job training as an instruc-
tional process, the students will
not be working in repetitive pro-1
duction jobs.
"Industry seems just as inter-
ested in the educational aspects
of the program as, we are," Stir-
ton said.
oung Democrats
onvene Tonight
The Young Democratic Club at
the University will hold its first
business meeting of the year at
8 p.m. tonight in Rm. 3D of the
Union.
Several vacancies among. the
officers will be filled and -a new
chairman for this semester will be
elected, according to David Svet,
'60, vice-president of the group.

RISE STEVENS- appears to-
morrow evening in Concert
Series opening.
Bus. Ad. Hosts
15 Students
Th4is.Weekend
Business Administration Student
Council will host 15 University of
Toronto commerce students Octo-
ber 3 through 6 during the annual
"Toronto Weekend."
Held alternately each year at
Toronto and Ann Arbor, the pur-
pose of the weekend is to enable
business administration students
to exchange ideas on the business
world.,
Students will tour Michigan Bell
Telephone ,Company's Detroit
headquarters on Tuesday to see
demonstrations of the company's
latest equipment. The Argus
Camera Company in Ann Arbor
and the U-M Memorial Phoenix
Project will also be visited on that
day.
Students will be formally greeted
by Dean Russell A. Stevenson of
the Business Administration school
Friday. He will introduce a group
discussion on "Free Enterprise ver-
sus Planned Economy."
At a dinner meeting at the
Michigan Union, Lionel H. Laing,
professor of political science, will
speak on "Living Apart."
Plans for Saturday will include
the Michigan=Georgia football
game, lunch at Alpha Kappa Psi-
and dinner at Delta Sigma Pi, both
professional business fraternities.

Rise Stevens. Replaces Pons
In Concert Series Opening
* Rise Stevens, mezzo-soprano of
S the Metropolitan Opera Company
will open the Choral Union concert
series in Hill Auditorium at 8:30
~p.mn. Thursday.
The program will include selec-
tions by Handel, Mozart, Greig,
Bizet, and a group of Contempor-
ary American songs. James Sho-
mate, Miss Stevens' accompanist,
will play a group of numbers from
Debussy's :"Revel."
Miss Stevens will replace Lily
Pons in the opening concert. Miss
Pons is ill with the grippe and has
been advised by her doctor not to
ammannsm2g. '

AA Council
Analyzes
Water Bids
Sealed bids on expansion of the
greater North Campus area water
system were opened yesterday,
according to Guy C. Larcom, city
administrator.
The additions to the system,
which will include an under-
ground storage tank, pumping
station, and transmission mains,
will be financed jointly by the
University and the city. They will
provide more water for North
Campus and companies located
there, as well as persons living in
the area.
DIAL NO 2-2513

Often styled "First Lady of the
Opera," Miss Stevens made her
debut at the Prague Opera House
in the title role of "Mignon."
Miss Stevens, who holds the dis-
tinction of being the highest sell-.
ing recording artist in the classical
field today, appears regularly on
numerous radio and television
broadcasts.
Beginning her career at the age
of ten, Miss Stevens first appeared
as a primadonna on a children's
program. In her teens, she sang
with the Opera Comique in New
York.
She became the first American-
born star of the Metropolitan
Opera to appear in a world-pre-
miere of an Italian Opera in 'Italy,
singing the title role of "Devil's
Daughter" at Milan's La Scala
opera house.
Miss Stevens has starred in the
motion picture, "The Chocolate
Soldier" and "Going My -Way,"
She has made numerous appear-
ances on the "Voice of Firestone"
television program.
Miss Stevens was the first Met-
ropolitan Opera star to be able
to cover a voice range for three
repertoires.

Police Plan
Campaign
An educational campaign to a
quaint. University students wi
rules: for pedestrians is bei:
planned by the police departme
City Administrator Guy C. Le
com told City Council Mond
Larcom spoke ;n response to
question by Councilman Fra
A.C. Davis, who asked if any la
provided for enforcement of reg
lations by means of tickets.
Davis also expressed conce
about students crossing Sti
Street without waiting for-"Wal
signals.
MASONIC TEMPLE
(Detroit)
ONE TIME ONLY!
FRIDAY * 8:20 P.M.

- ' I i -

CINEMAScOP COLOR BY DELUXE
with
JOAN BLONDELL
BETSY DRAKE
JAYNE MANSFIELD
COMING
"PRI DE
AND THE
"PASSION"

~' I~with his tompony off out-
:tonding eartits fromeaft
the islands of the Coribbgan.
SINGERS, DANCERS, DRUMMERS
TRINIDAD STEEL BAND
"Superb performers . . . highly
sophisticated, elegont .. . truly
Primitive." ..riety

11

Choice Seats Ar

I.r r r y.
Grinnell's : Masonic Temp
$3.3t $2.7511$2.20, $1.65
(Tax InCI.).

TONY
RAN DALL
MdIn

Nq

-THURSDAY F R I DAY SATURDAY
rcornpletely cafpsivating ...
light and sagacious conedy"-N. Y. TIMES
' TEA HOU SE of- theAGSTMO
AUU,$T, Pulitzer Prize and Critics' Circle Award Winner
in LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
O directed by TED HEUSEL
S . BoxOffice Open 10-5:30 Tickets: Thurs., Fri., $1.50
NO 8-6300 Sat $1.65
GOOD SEASON TICKETS ALSO AVAILABLE
ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATER
U " ) '=> ) {G CC"(=> .ft t= > { lt3 ==}< 7t=, i= {) { !( C

T~

DIRECT PROM TRIUMPHANT
OF EUROPE AND THE ORI
"One of the finest dancers of e
-WALTER T
.Y.HereldT
JEAN-L
4 DEST

MAIL ORDERS NOW
ANN ARBOR CIVIC BALLET presents
VA KiTCHELL
World Famous Dance Satirist

Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre - Tuesday, Oct. 15,
Main Floor $2.20, $2.95:- Balcony $1.65, $2.20,
Tax Included
Box office open beginning Thursday, Oct. 10

8:30
$2.95

I'

YOU MAY MISS THE

1

MASS MEETING

for the

Hillel Assembly

#'p,
./ ,

;, ;

The startling story of a
crime most flawlessly
plotted , . , most bril-
liantly executed .r.
and most suspensefully
dissected ..

IE

Pd
ICY

y
NBC OPERA,
COMPANY
Concert version in English, of
THE MARRIAGE
OF FIGARO
at the first concert of the
EXTRA CONCERT SERIES
in Hill Auditorium
Sun., Oct.6, 8:30 P.M.
t

l

I

#, If you are interested in working with other stu-
dents and developing leadership ability, join the
HILLEL ASSEMBLY. The mass meeting is Thurs-
day, Oct. 3, 4:00, in the B'nai B'rith Hillel Foun-
dation, 1429Mil.

Id:

NOW

DIAL
NO 2-3 136

I

"AN
EXCELLENT
PICTURE!
REALLY
FINE!"
- Her. Trib.

I

'BAR
OyI

but don't forget to
sign up for your
SENIOR PICTURE
APPOINTMENT

.!

-1

Starring
JACK HAWKINS
*A

TYRONE a
POWER
ARI

I

1I

L_ :

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