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September 22, 1957 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-09-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-1

,DRESSES will
n Everywhere
upus - Rushing
- games -

i*

yonderful season for you and a
ru season for your wardrobe, too!
;r dresses will be seen more than
I the Dillon Shop has the styles
u will love to be seen in! Sheer
erseys- with new and exciting
ins, tweeds and flannels are all
' in this headline-making collec-
in sizes 7-15
.egular and tall sizes 10-20
Dresses . . . from $14.95

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BACK -FROM EUROPE:
Sallade Cites Dividends
Of U.S. Foreign Policy

Dresses .
41)

. to $39.95

' SWEDEN

Vtr

Al

I

LEFT Is a handsome
black wool jersey sheath
cap sleeve dress topped
by smart tweed brief
Jacket with velvet collar
of $29.95
The clever tam of block
velvet'}$5.95
Wearrites smart shortie
fine cotton gloves $2.95

$17.95
A study in soft flattery--
\ the slender sheath by
Mindy Ross in 100%
wool jersey plaid.Rates
:>:every compl iment in the

State Representative George W.
Sallade (R-Ann Arbor) returned
from a European tour with praise
for the existing foreign policy and
some harsh words for its oppon-
ents.
Sallade docked in New York
City on the Queen Mary, Tuesday,
Sept. 17, after five weeks of travel
during which he visited six Euro-
pean countries.
He immediately issued a state-
ment in which he said that "The
program of foreign aid in the form
of both economic and military
assistance to the countries of
Europe has created for the United
States a position of unparalled
good will and' leadership.
Praises Foreign Policy
"After visiting with countless
numbers of small businessmen,
farmers and people in the service
industries," he continued, "I am
firmly convinced that the Eisen-
hower approach to the question of
foreign aid spending by the United
States is producing remarkable
dividends."
As to how foreign aid affects the
people of Michigan, Sallade said
that it is "now on the threshold of
even closer ties with the old world
through the coming development
of the St. Lawrence Seaway. A
visit to Europe and talks withj
Matty To Talk
To Zoologiss
The Department of Fisheries.
will feature a talk by Allen Matty
on Monday, Sept. 28, at 4:15 p.m.
in the Natural Science Auditorium.
Matty, a lecturer in zoology at
the University. of Nottingham,
England, will speak on "Hormones
and Fish."
Matty is a specialist in fish
endocrinology, and was the first
to remove the thyroid gland from
a fish. The gland has been used
for research on fish hormones.
With John E. Bardach, associate,
professor of fisheries of the Uni-.
versity's school of natural re-
sources, Matty studied fish colora-
tion this past summer.
The researchers found th a t
color differences of a certain fam-
ily of fishes distinguishes their
sexes, with males bright and fe-
males drab. Formerly the differ-
ence had been interpreted by
zoologists to mean two separate
species.

other Americans traveling there
leave the unmistakable impression
of the many ties that bind the
citizens of this state with the coun-
tries of Europe."
Sallade also had some words of
advice for some of his colleagues.
"Our congressional representatives
as well as our state political lead-
ers -can no longer take refuge in
the traditional approach of Middle
West isolation to the problems of
our neighbors across the sea."
Extolls Catholic Church
Sallade also had particular
praise for the Catholic Church,
calling it "one of the greatest
forces operating against the spread
of Communism in Europe." He said
of Pope Pius XII, "his influence
not only among the members of
his own church but among other
democratic leaders is both obvious
and pronounced. Probably no sin-
gle individual has done more to
bolster the forces of democracy in
Europe." Sallade participated in a
general audience with the pope.
He stated, however, that the
current civil rights fight in Arkan-
sas was a severe detriment to
American influence in Europe.
"Unfortunately," he said, "re-
cent developments in Arkansas
where a Democratic governor has
tried to set himself about the law
of the land . . . has been a severe
set-back to the United States and
what it has traditionally stood
for." He said that the name of
Arkansas Governor Orval E. Fau-
bus was to, be seen in every paper
in Europe.
Warns Republicans
Turning to domestic affairs, Sal-
lade offered' a warning to his
party. "Here in this state," he said,
"the Republican party cannot af-
ford to seemingly continue its in-
decision as to whether it intends to
move into tomorrow's world as a
leader or merely a 'reluctant fol-
lower with negative views."
Calling on the voters, he said
"obviously only a decision at the
polls will eventually resolve this
question. Sooner or later the Re-
publican voters of Michigan must
state their choice as to the type of
candidate and party they prefer."
Sallade then went on to say
that he intends to exert pressure
on Republican party members to
bring them around to his view-
point, even to the extent of form-
ing a coalition within the party
that will back him up, "regardless
of -whom it may offend."
He also hinted strongly that he
intends to run In the gubernatorial
election of 1958 or 1960, saying
that "obviously I will certainly
place my own record before the
people of this state as a candidate
for higher office in one of those
years."

+

COMMFN/Sr BOC
AP Newsfeature

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JUGA l
i SPAIN

'

FRANCE __
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*~~A% gil~ A~ITALY4rA

ON

®,ttIrrwbnzck $ow~ptex Fair (Sept.21-29)
© rix $?t2Z 71t e Fate' pts29-COc 6)
R Gket Fait 7ryde Foirm(ept. r-22)
.(gy X2zee tllTrtrde f/r(epwtl1-9) ,
Sbcdrgldtr(SFciep l l6')
! Mcrseilles 'c ade Rm"(ept.1-30)
® offon, Gacrtwomtc A r'. A"
M*Z 7erlsv 7L3ui gldliAfclrmerzy /Zxr' (MrwJ*,VctAu n p!
Ijl23reme, Agrcutturra( Fair (At *out rkh Set5$)
Ofertbadk .etker Falrirtu~,y{h Sepe, ')
0 1 hroA'*tS-ooke Fair (Oct 5-0)
Q1 Cotogte Rbcishod xn'(S 6-87
Q Murniefr.Trer'y xhirbit ept,29-elf?
Q Zlusseld'orf Thru' fat? (0cIr7-m ,

M0'

MMU
iQ lowest'oft .Fker'e . 'x~9i5r.ZW 21-2U )
1 $crloni/ea Trade Far (Sepflt-22)
Q'forrza, xaSartples Fatr(Sept e-14)
® Thira* fctrr of fhe .ev~zgt (Sept. 7-?S)
m 73ari Trade Fr (!Sept. 7-25)
U Ztrerbt Tiwad e., ar (Se 312 )
® Amsfmerdaam Amidno Zxpositron (Sept J1-2Sf
!'St Er*k's Fare oe &*A Vxm4qW. X-Sept: 1,5
1 Swiss Arb atonart At aszene S pz'- 7-22)
UGeneva Ahxkiffoof Wcrtckres am ev~
(f7~O*Ogb Sep4 5.)
Zws oIky I 'rta at Sf $aiket -1}-"J20)
?Z2*mu' T*~xde A/Z' ?; ur*Se#p2R))
.ZII Zc'rv 2o A~tW$epf 7-22)

1111 South U.
on Forest
around the corner
from the
Campus Theatre

book with its smooth,
uncluttered I i n e s that
take to the busy city life
with the greatest of ease
travel on campus
with equal good grace!
So smart - its three-
quarter button trimmed
sleeves . . . button-down
back. Completely lined
for an always perfect
shape.

* MIR$ ;W-RE £f.Ml'O3S7ES'DWLL HAV-f PZAVS

SOURCE. EUROPEAN TPAVA L COMA64ISS/4N,_

Fairs Bu reau Displays American Ware

) MICHIGANDALY CLASSIFIEDS

By HERMAN ALLEN
Associated Press Newsfeatures Writer
It's fair time again--time for
American farmers to ready their
prize livestock and pumpkins and
for their wives to set out their
best needlework and preserves for
county and state expositions.
But for a little known office in
the United States Department of
Commerce it's always fair time.,h
Every month, somewhere in the
world, there is at least one inter-
national trade fair, where busi-
nessmen of nearly every nation
display their wares in the hope of
obtaining new outlets-and gov-
ernments try to sell their way of
life.
Historically,-trade fairs go back.
to about 500 B.C., when the Old
Testament book of Esther says
Persian King Xerxes displayed

shetland look

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Ak #

Idw

I

.

13. ii

i

"the riches of his kingdom." In
their modern form they date from
he European reconstruction days
after World War I.
Communists Stage Fairs
Suspended for the most part
during World War II, they were
back in full swing bY 1950. But
American business, witi more or-
ders than it could handle, partici-
pated only lightly in post-World
War II fairs, the United States
government not at all.
The Communist countries, how-
ever, saw a propaganda opportu-
nity and grabbed it. While in -1950-
51 they participated in only 15, by
1954 they were sending displays ,to
46.
America, bawled a Soviet propa-
gandist in 1954, was 'ptoo busy
making atomic bombs to take part
in peaceful exhibits."
President Dwight D, Eisenhower,
stung when he heard - of this,
promptly asked Congress to estab-
lish the Office of International
Trade Fairs in the Commerce De-
partment.-
America Competes
This was in September. By De-
cembeir, through mammoth effort,
the office was ready with a "fruits
of freedom" exhibit for the fair
at Bangkok, Thailand. The .Rus-
sians, who had taken top awards
for their 1953 Bangkok exhibit,
got wind of United States plans
and shipped their own elaborate
display back to Moscow.
American d i s p 14 a y s generally
consist of a "central exhibit" set
up by the OITF, carrying' some
theme like "do-it-yourself," "150
years of industrial progress" or
"America at home." Surrounding
this aro exhibits set up by United
States business concerns.
The idea of the display as a
whole is to put foreign business-
men in touch with American pro-
duct sources-plus s o m e t h i n g
totally new at such fairs, to, help,
foreign manufacturers find mar-
kets in the United States.

At Cologne, Germany, a wor
manufacturer of novelty pla
cards asked a consultant whe
her goods would sell in Ame
"Every novelty store in
United States has cards
those,"' said the consultant,
missing one batch-"but try
porting these." He picked t
deck of facsimiles of 14th cen
cards.
The'woman took his advike
profited.
Probably the greatest Amer
triumph at a foreign fair tot
was at this year's exposition
Poznan, Poland. On the first
alone, an estimated 85,000 per
gawked hungrily at American
zen foods, refrigerators, wasl
machines, a model home.
New Appropriation
Encouraged byr the Poznanr
cess, the,OITF has askedCong
for $2,200,000 in addition to
600,000 already approved for :
year so that it can put on a s
in Moscow at the same time
Soviet government puts on an
Russian show.
Apparently recovered from I
fear of competing with 'Amer
exhibitors, the Russians haye
vited the United States to ex]
on terms which Under Secre
of Commerce Walter Williams
'scribes as apparently offered
good faith. The exhibit, Willi
told a House appropriations
committee, would try to show
"1. That American industr
producing goods in mass qi
tities at low prices.
"2. That every American fa
can and does own more and r
of these goods.
"3. That the United States
developed methods of produc
and distribution with the end'
of less human labor and c
tinually lowering costs."
Williams said "we believe t
points can be made; similar pc
were in fact realized at Pozn

the University Inter-Arts Magazine

GENERATION

TRY-OUT MEETING

Monday, Sept.

23-7:30

P.M.

Student Publications Building

4

_w

1

Iy.

writing
publicity

John Bonin
Branch Mgr.

Jerry Penby
Sales Mgr.

~QI.

*ORCHESTRAS

selling

AND

*

ENTERTAINMENT

The Shetland Took has never been so important
as it is this Fall . . and our stock of Shetland
sweaters has never been more beautiful... select
yours now, either in solid glowing colors or in soft,
misty heather tones. Pullovers 8.95 to 14.95. Car-

advertising

layout

.
. ,
0
0
0
0r
0

JOHNNY HAUBEND
JENNY FENBY
BILL HENLINE

DON
BOB
SKIP

VINCENT
DOU PAY
HORNER

THE BALLOON MAN
CALYPSO SINGER
HARMONICA DUO

MAGICIAN

DON HAVENS
JONNY L1BBY
DON HAVENS
REVEL KENYON

DACON

digans 10.95 to 14.95.

Wart[

NAME BANDS
AND TALENT

jl(
1R t

Y

m .:

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