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September 21, 1957 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-09-21

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%THE ICMIGAN DAILY __ _

URDAY, 5

WOONNOWSOM

s ANNOUNCE:
tecepts Over $50,000 in Grants

Aid to ElderlyFound Poor in State

10 in grants for Can-
were accepted by the
erday.
were part of $443;-
ants, gifts and be-
ed by the Regents at
iber meeting.
z the cancer research
5,000 from the Amer-
Society for a research
r the direction of Dr.
eel. The same donor
5,088 for a research
r the direction of Dr.
Kahn.
Fund Increased
ersity's Cancer Re-
itute also received

Wilson

$1,000 from the American Medical
Society's Genessee County unit
and $100 from the Barry County
unResearch into the administra-
tion of public welfare medical care
will be financed by a $38,744irom
the American Public Welfare As-
sociation.
Three grants were accepted
from the Michigan Heart Associa-
tion: $16,000 will be for studies,
under the direction of Dr. Heri,,
bert E. Sloan, Jr., on the use of
heart pumps in traxardiac sur-
gery. The other grants, for $3,500
and $13,881.27, are earmarked for
,the Dean's Fund-in the Medical
School.
Receives GraVts
The Automotive Laboratory was
the recipient of a 'total of $19,100
including $14,000 from the Olds-
mobile 'Division of General Mo-
tors. The Regents also accepted
$'10,500 from G.M. for the corpor-
ation's College Scholarships fund
and $1,500 for its National Schol-
arship fund.
Three grants totaling, $16,080
were accepted from the Mott
$8,740 was for the foundation's
Foundation in Flint. One grant of
dentistry fellowship fund and $5,-
000 was accepted for the Social
Science Research fund of the Uni-
versity's Institute for Human Ad-
justment. A third grant of $2,340
was for the foundation's Medical.
Scholarship fund.
$13,897 was accepted from Mrs.
Standish Backus for the Standish
Backus Memorial Scholarship
fund.
Continued support of the dental.
teaching program was accepted in

a $13,239 grant from the W. K.
Kellogg Foundation.
Accept Funds
Funds totaling $12,525 were ac-
cepted for the Religious Centen-
nial fund being used to mark the
centennial of religious activities
at the University. The biggest
contributor was the Kresge foun-
dation which gave $10,000. The
National Conference of Christians
and Jews gave $10,000.
From the Allen Industries
Foundation came an additional
$100 and the H. T. Ewald Foun-
dation gave $25. The National
pauvjS g &papo stsoialoS e ldilnw
$12,000 for research by Dr. Wal-
lace W. Tourtelotte.
A grant of $12,000 was accepted
from the Foundation for Research
on Human Behavior. The funds
will finance a study on the basic
skills of leadership to be con-
ducted by Prof. John R. P. French
at the Research Center for Group
,Dynamics.
Grants From Dow
Two accepted grants from the
Dow Chemical Company include
$5,000 for pharmacology research
and $2,877.50 for the Dow Ich-
neumoidae Project connected with
insect classification.
The 'Regents accepted from the
E. I. du Pont de' Memours and
Company $3,900 for a 'postgradu-
ate teaching fellowship in chem-
istry. The company also granted
$1,200 for the Chemical and Met-
allurgical┬░ Engineering Special
Fund and $2,350 for a post grad-
uate fellowship in chemical en-
gineering.
The Regents also accepted 121
other grants ranging from $7,500
to $2.

A recent state-wide survey of
county-operated medical facilities
revealed institutions poorly
equipped and under-staffed to
provide rehabilitative care for
elderly patients.
Conducted by the University's
Division of Gerontology, the sur-
vey included all 39 county-oper-
ated facilities in Michigan.
A grant to the University for
research in human resources dur-
ing 1956-57 covered the $13,000
cost of the survey.
Compares With Standards
Comparison with national stan-
dards for maximum administra-
tive efficiency and rehabilitative
care found many of the county fa-
cilities overcrowded. Full-time
specialists in medical and rehabil-
itative care were employed by few
of the institutions.
Wilma T. Donahue, chairman
of the Division of Gerontology,
commenting on the survey said,

"Most institutions and their old-
er residents are eager for help in
establishing more effective reha-
bilitation programs."
"Generally speaking, county
medical care facilities are doing
the best they can with the per-
sonnel and resources they have,"
she said, "But in many instances,
they lack the funds and staff ne-
cessary to carry out an extensive
rehabilitation program."
Admits Residenits
Residents wholly or partially
dependent on public funds were
admitted by all the institutions
included in the survey. Mentally
ill cases were accepted by only
half, some only until such time
as other arrangements could be
made.
Medical care standards require
every patient to be given a com-
plete medical exanination at spe-

cified intervals. They also call for
segregation of acute illness cases.
Only 14 met the medical exam-
ination requirement and all but
one reported bed changes in the
case of acute illness.
Lack Personnel
A lack of specialized personnel
was brought out in the survey.
Nine of the institutions failed to
employ a full-time general prac-
titioner.
None employed specialists from
such fields as physical medicine
or dentistry on a full-time basis.
The report found that the lack
of, specialized personnel, inplud-
ing those who are vital to any re-
habilitative program, Is fairly ob-
vious.
"This does not mean, however,
that the institutions as a whole
were totally lacking in rehabili-
tation procedures," the report
continued.

4.

The rector of the University of
Rangoon, Burma, Htin Aung, will
begin a week's visit at the Uni-
versity Monday.
During the week he will conduct
the seminar on Southeast Asia for
Prof. Robert Crane, of the far
Eastern studies department. He
will discuss Burma's land, educa-
tion, people, religion and position
in Asia.
His titles include: vice presi-
dent of the Association of South-
East Asian Institutes of Higher
Learning, 1957-59; honorary colo-
nel in the Burmese Army and
honorary aide to the President of
the Union of Burma.
Publish Books
Aung has published the books
"Burmese Drama," "B u r m e s e

Folk-tales" and "Pre-Budd
Religion of the Burmese.".
He has received an A.B. f
the University of Rangoon
LL.M. from the Landon Schoo
Economics. He has also x
granted an LL.B from Qui
College in Cambridge and a
Litt, from Trinity College in B
lin.
Receives Doctorate
He has been awarded a Do
of Laws Honoris Causae f
Rangoon in 1953, a Doctor of L
Honoris Causae from Johns].
kins in 1955 and Doctor of L
Jure Dignitatis from the Z
versity of Dublin in 1956.
His visit is being sponsoreH
the Asia Foundation.

BEGINS VISIT TO 'U':
Burmese To Conduct
Southeast Asia Seninar

hestra

Wilson, vice-presi-
'ational Music Camp,
onductor of the Ann
hony yesterday, ac-
oger E. Jacobi, pres-
Symphony Associa-
o will also conduct
Michigan Civic Or-
been Director of
)rchestras at several
ding the University
nd the University of
esident of the Mis-
ducators Association,
served as guest in-
[uctor and adjudica-
er of educational in-
te-wide festivals and
rences.
students who have
experience may at-
st rehearsal of the
ymphony ts be held
Tuesday in the In-
Rehearsal , room of
igh School.
Wddition
dhool
Regents yesterday
neral contractor to
bion to the School of
ctor, Jeffres-Dyer of
D.C., won the con-
w bid basis.
udget for the addi-
000. The funds come
004 grant by the
cPublic Health Serv-
V. K. Kellogg Foun-
,le Creek.
n will house facili-
c health research.

For the Finest in Dining -

Restaurants You Will Enjoy

CH'UCK WAGON
LUNCH and DINNERS Fine Salads & Sandwiches
FAMOUS FOR ROAST BEEF
Serving your favorite Beer, Wines and Champagne-
Pizza Pie Served After 8:00 P.M.
. ,\
Open From 11 A.M. to 11 P.M. ,
2045 PACKARD NO 2-1661
Catering at Your Home or Hall Henry Turner, Prop.

IL

frl-

OPEN

-

OLD GERMAN RESTAURANT
ANN ARBOR'S FINEST,
FINEST IN MUSIC ,ND FINE'ST IN FOOD
TAKE-OUT DINNERS
Select from our entire Menu
OPEN FROM 11 A.M. to 12 P.M.
With meals served until 8 P.M. - Closed Thursday
PHONE NO 2-0737
When Im~portant Peo ple come to town.
--highlight their visit with luncheon or dinner at the
Corner House.-where food, service and surroundings
meet your every wish. Tuesday through Saturday, 11:30
to 2:00 and 5:00 to 7:00.Sunday: Dinner, 12:00 to
3:00. May we suggest that you
telephone for reservations?
- Vlz Co i1eer Joa e
5. Thayer at Washington inr Ann Arbor
A block west of Rackham Bldg.-NO 8-6056

TONIGHT

To help you cut the

High Cost of Living

. . @ .

(and every niht

We are

'Til' 10

ii

now offering
a Fast, Low-Cost

0

Self-Serve

FROM 11 A.M.'TIL 9:00 PM.

S*

II

'(Waiter Service as Usual)'
from 9 'til midnite

LEO
PING

For an

Exotic Treat

J

6

The Home of FINE FOOD
PietjeI 6e11

Our chefs are ready to prepare the most delicious food
for your enjoyment.
You w wU be served the tinest in
Cantonese and Amei-an-- food

f

i:

Bob Marshall's

TAIK-OUT ORDERS ANY TIME

AIR CONDITIONED,

120 E. LIBERTY

Book Shop

TWITH

ACROSS

FROM LANE HALL

J1

lli

90t4h Opeftift9

I 1

THOMPSON'S RESTAURANT
lfpu 9 lihe 1""'
takes pleasure in announcing
on addition to their menu
of fine foogis
PIZZA
will be served daily
from -11 A.M. to 1 A.M
in our new dining room
"THE DUCHESS ROOM"
Expertly prepared by our special pizza pie maker and

i- jjI
_y _I

i

to

Closed Momdfo
LEO PING
18 West Lierty
'Phone NO 2-5624

For A Delicious Dinner

/j

_

in Ann Arbor

Dine at WEBER'S

UICKIE CHICKIE RESTAURANT
Southern Fried Chicken Our Specialty

(;.,, ~-

* Short Orders
* Carry Out
F / ~ . aw 11

Deleious
STEAK, CHICKEN.
SEAFOOD

Your Favorite
BEER, WINE,
and

p

I

lill

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