100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 16, 1958 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-02-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MCHIGAN DAILY

SUNDA,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY,

?LANS AHEAD:
ersity Group Studies Rising Enrollment Problems

ELIs Register, Begin

Classe

SELMA SAWAYA
ng the nation-wide con-
rising enrollments, the
e on Student Affairs at
rsity of Illinois recently
eries of questions to the
ation concerning the
he university in 10 years.
Idy was made at the re-
pe University of Illinois'
nmittee on Student Pro-
he answers to the ques-
ed appeared in a series
s in the Daily Illini, the
Impus newspaper.
tion to the problem of
ation, the CSA asked,
1 the University manage
inicate to a larger stu-

dent body, and how will students'
communicate with staff, adminis-
tration, and other students?"
Dean of Illinois Students Fred
H. Turner commented, "The prob-
lem which arises in any institution
is whether the intended object
wants to receive the message.
"Communications must be a
mutual proposition (between stu-
dents and the University)."
Program Outlined
"Ordinarily, the student does
not push himself on a University
staff member for an appointment.
The problem is/to encourage stu-
dents to cominunicate; I would
hate to see all communication go-
ing in one direction - down to
the students."

NGER

A

/

Dean of Students Turner then
outlined three proposed points
for future exchange of ideas be-
tween Illinois and its students.
The main objective, he said,
would be "to keep the individual
student as the unit," thus allow-
ing each one better communica-
tion of his needs.
Staffs to Increase.
Turner added that Illinois "is
expecting to add to its counseling
and instruction staff; and one of
the president's main objectives
has been to hold classes to a rea-
sonable size."!
The third point, Turner said,
was that Illinois is always ready
to implement such devices as edu-
cational -television, if they are
tested and proven useful for stu-
dent communication.,
Transfers to Increase
Adding to the increased enroll-
ment will be a greater number
of transfer students, CSA said,°
and with them will come problems
in adjustment to a large campus.
At present, Illinois is coping
with these problems ixr a program
of conferences, guidance examina-
tions, physical education, orienta-
tion and guidance.
CSA also asked, "What effect
will the expanded student body
have on the fraternity-sorority
system?"
In response to this query, As-
sistant Dean of Fraternity Men
Howard Neuberg said ". . . the
fraternity system may strengthen
itself a little bit, but it will prob-
ably become a smaller minority."
Affiliate Housing Necessary
Patricia Cross, Assistant Dean
of Sorority Women, disagreed with
this opinion, saying, "I don't be-
lieve that there is any threat to
the sorority system with the en-
larged University ... . there will be.
many possibilities of enlarge-
ment."
The affiliated system is current-
ly important to the University
housing program, both deans
pointed out.,
"Fraternities provide the largest
amount of group housing for
undergraduate men, excluding
private housing," Neuberg said.
Deans Cross and Turner are.
optimistic about the future of the,
affiliated system on the campus,

NG MANY j
MODEL TRADE-INS+

LSO FLOOR MODELS
ND DEMONSTRATORS

Look at these typical reductions on various'
make machines received in trade on our new
models. First come,.first served!

THIS WEEK ONLY

To cope with the growing enroll-
ment, Dean Cross s u g g e s t e d
"double chapters."
Suggests Improvements
"Perhaps there could be two
chapters of the same sorority on
campus, or maybe there could be
more national chapters."
She said the main reason sor-
orities should maintain or increase
their strength in the future Uni-
versity is because of the size of
the housing units.
"Many students do not like to
live in dormitories as large as the
University provides," she com-
mented.
Residence Halls Important
Residence halls are another im-
portant consideration of the Uni-
versity 10 years hence, CSA com-
mented.
Kretschmer said that "most
housing will be kept to units of
250, in an effort to maintain the
feeling that the student is a mem-
ber of one house."
Kretschmer concluded, "Of
course, with the predicted increase
in enrollment, there will be con-
siderably more University housing
built to accommodate students.
But any housing program will de-
pend on the enrollment and on
the available amount of private
housing."
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)
gy or Math; Jr. H.S. Math/Science;
Woman Counselor; Jr. H.S. Social Stud-
ies/English.
Battle Creek, Mich. - AU fields.
Racine, Wisc. - Special Education;
Speech Therapy; Elementary; High
Schoo:1 Music; Band/Orchestra; Eng-
lish; Social Studies; Art; Physics; Social
btudies Dept. Head Industrial Arts; Jr.
High: Core; Math; Homemaking; In-
dustrial Arts; Librarian; Science; Art.
Wed., Feb. 19
Clarkston, Mich. - Elementary; Eng-
lish; Science; Math; Elementary-vocal.
, Thurs., Feb. 20
White Plains, N.Y.,- Elementary;
Elementary -vocal music; Elementary
physical education*; Elementary art;
Ungraded; Jr. H.S.: Girls Physical Edu-
cation; vocal Music: Ungraded; Math;
English: EnglishfiSocial Studies/French;
Industrial Arts; High School; English;
Social Studies; Math; Science; Visiting
Teacher.
NWoman.
Flint; Michigan - All fields, espe-
oially Kindergarten; Elementary; Men-
tally Retarded; Speech; Industrial Arts;
Speech Correction.
Fri., Feb. 21
Flint, Mich. - See above.
For any additional information. and
appointments, contact the Bureau of
Appointments, 3528 Administration
Building, NO 3-1511, Ext. 4r9.
Recruiters for the Army Dependents
Schools overseas will be at the Employ-
ment Security Commission Commercial
and Professional Office, 7310 Woodward
Ave., Detroit, Mich. on Feb. 20, 21, and
22 to interview candidates for teaching
positions for the 1958-59 'school year.
Candidates who meet the following gen-
eral requirements should call Tinity
2-4900 in Detroit for an appointment:
United States citizenship; 23 to 60
years of age; Bachelor's degree from an
accredited college; eighteen semester
hours credit in education courses; cur-
rent employment full time in the pro-
fession'as a teacher or administrator or
in furthering professional education
background; two years of successful ex-
perience in the educational profession
within the 5 year period immediately
preceding appointment for an oversea
position; physical ability to perform
duties; marital status (married couples
are not hired as a team, married wom-
en or women with children under 18
years of age or with dependents who
must be domiciled with them are not
hired.)
For additional information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Ad-
ministration Building, NO 3-1511, Ext.
489.

Enrollment in the current Eng-
lish Language Institute intensive
course is the highest ever for this
time of year, according to Bryce
Van Syoc of the Institute staff.
Arriving in Ann Arbor last week,
the new students have undergone
an orientation program and began
their classes Tuesday. Numbering
82, they come from a score of
countries.
Van Syoc explains that more
than half come from Spanish-
speaking countries. Since many of
the students room in South Quad-
rangle, it is often difficult for the
staff to keep them speaking Eng-
lish all the time.
Last year a pledge was signed
that students would speak only
English in the dorm.
Despite difficulties of this sort,
though, the Institute's program
gives students practice of all sorts
in using 'English.
Classes are divided into Pro-
nunciation, Laboratory Drills, Vo-
cabulary, Grammar and Pattern
Practice. These are augmented by
conversations in English between
pupil and instructor during meals
and by evening activities.
One night a week the Institute's
students are shown movies, often
of life in this country, always
with English soundtracks. Anoth-
er night they see programs of
slides.
Each Tuesday and Friday eve-
ning, the students take a more
active role in their learning ofmEn-
glish, singing songs and putting
on programs entirely in English.
The students are exposed to En-
glish in all aspects of their stay in
Ann Arbor, for as ELI founder
Prof. Charles C. Fries put it, "Ev-
ery language is inextricably bound
up with the culture of those who
speak it.", The students are , at-
tempting to absorb some of that
culture.

CONFUSION -- Faced for the
first time with the puzzle of
the University's complex "rail-
road ticket" registration form,
many of the Institute's 80 new
students were baffled, and called
for help as did this Asian stu-
dent.

TO THE RESCUE - In the case of confusion over registration,
however, the EU students had a source of relief not open to the
ordinary confused freshman. Here as in other plights concerning
University red tape, misunderstandings due to language barriers,
and unfamiliar American customs, a teacher from the Institute
staff is on hand to help.

DAILY
PHOTO
FEATURE
Story by
THOMAS TURN ER
Photos by
KARL HOK

ELECTRIC PORTABLES AS LOW AS $199.
BEAUTIFUL CONSOLES AS LOW AS $3995
Make your choice earlylasy Terms!
INGER SEWING CENTER,
Lsd In phone book under SINGER SEWINq MACHINE COMPANY)
114 SOUTH MAIN

andma t t 5r Graa etMA [tlAe rURIOCo2Qc.'

-

i

I

I

/}
4.t
TheE'Sugood futur

.
:
J .
#

MEALS TOGETHER--All of the ELIs eat together in a South-
Quad dining room, tecers conducting conversations designed to
sharpen the student's command of conversational English. Critics
of the program have said that eating with the Americans would
better integrate the EL students into their houses in the Quad,
but the meals provide an important part of the practice required
to learn English.

WELCOMED BY DIRECTOR - Prof. Robert Lado appeared be-
fore the new students from the rostrum of Rickham Amphi-
theater, welcoming them to the University and explaining the
program of the Institute. Prof. Lado came to the University in
1945, and now holds three positions: director of the Institute,
associate professor of English and associate professor of English
teaching in the education school

L

{
;sF;..:.;:"":
" fl r
A V

. r" r "rw. ...

MILKMAID
LIPSTICKS
Cintrodu ce
an exciting
W COLOR

rfor you in

EXAMINATION - A Latin
American student takes the pro-
ficency test given to all enrolled
in the intensive course. Similar
tests, developed by the English
Language Institute are used in
such far-off places as Australia,
where immigrants are given
them.

Newspaper A dvertisrng
Like to meet people? Be "on the inside" in impor-
tant business planning and promotion? Enjoy developing
new ideas? Grow into a position of importance in your
own community?
If you do, there's a rewarding, interesting career
ahead for you in newspaper advertising.

QUAD LiVING-Many students were placed in various houses of
South Quad, and found the cafeteria dining and personal phones
new experiences. Jose Gonzales of Mexico attempts to study his
pattern-practice book while a friend uses his phone. Gonzales'
room-mate is a Persian, so they share only English to converse in.

LAB PRACTICE-A major por-
tion of the ELIs' class time is
passed in the language labora-
tory, Mason Hall. Tapes aug-
ment classroom grammar, pat-
tern, vocabulary and pronunci-
ation drills.

d°"i

4,..

?je
'C

TRY OUT for

50
plus fox

iir kM tjan 4ti
BUSINESS STAFF

Milkmaid Lipsticks are 15% Pure,
Sweet, REAL Cream, giving
a dewy-fresh, naturally moist,
alluring silky finish to the lips,
preventing drying or cracking,
keeping them youthful and-luscious.!
Sixteen lovely colors stay true
in any light ... newest is
"Redberrie," vibrant, light bright'

1

k

Ak'.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan