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May 27, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-05-27

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TH

IV

TJU TUESDAY, MAY 27,. 1OSS

PROFESSOR LADO:
Word Meanings Differ with Cultures

Whittemore Discusses
Plant, Soil Experiments
By JAMES SEDER(I

r "y Y VTA"IT 1UP .MO

Our word "lunch," defined as
the midday meal, might lead a
foreigner to a misunderstanding
of American culture, according to
Professor Robert F. Lado, head of
the English Language Institute.
Prof. Lado explained that a
South American would assume
that lunch is a full course meal-
a time when the family gets to-
gether to exchange experiences of
the day. But in the United States
lunch means something entirely
different.
In Spain, the chief headquarters
of Prof. Lado's coming sabbatical
leave, he will gather cross-cultural
information pertinent to the
teaching of English as a foreign
language. Prof. Lado explained
that two people from different
cultures could interpret the same
thing in a completely different
manner.
Research Spanish Interpretation
"Visitors do not see us as we
are, and we do not see them as

11

they are. People view others in
terms of their own culture." Prof.
Lado said. His research will con-
sist of discovering the understand-
ing which the Spanish have of
certain English words. Prof. Lado
will try to find if there are gen-
eral trends of misunderstanding
which stem from basic miscon-
ceptions about the civilization of
the United States.
"A foreign language must be
taught in context with its cultur-
al background," he stressed. It is
not merely our intention to ex-
plode the cliches and myths which
are accepted as cultural knowl-
edge of groups, Prof. Lado said,
we are dealing with the broader
question of cultural influence on
language learning.
Formulated Teaching Method
Prof. Lado was the first person
to formulate a method for testing
English as a foreign language ob-
jectively. He explain'ed that for a
long time it was considered im-
possible to test pronunciation by
objective means. "Of course noth-
ing is completely objective," he
quickly added, "but we have
found a way to determine a stu-
dent's pronunciation facility by a
paper and pencil test."
From Spain, Prof. Lado will fly
to Japan to direct a seminar for
teachers of English as a foreign
language. The seminar, sponsored
by the American Embassy, the
United States Fulbright Commis-
sion in Japan, and the Japanese
Ministry of Education, will draw
teachers from the junior high
schools of all provinces.

-,Daily-Ian MacNiven
PROF. LADO
... going to Spain

ERE* SE COLEG
HARRISBURG * YORK
WILKES-BARRE
SCRANTON
,ANYWHERE IN PENNSYLVANIA
for reservations call WOodward 5-9800

"Valuable scientific research in
such areas as plant life and soil
experimentation can be performed
without reducing observations to
mathematical formulas," Prof.
H a r 1 o w O. Whittemore, retiring
chairman of the landscape archi-
tecture department said,
Except for four years spent as
a science' instructor at Highland
College in Kansas, Prof. Whitte-
more has spent all of his teach-
ing career at the University. One
of the reasons why he remained
at the University, Prof. Whitte-
more said, was the acquisition by
the department of Nichols Arbor-
etum in 1917.
Prof. Whittemore explained that
the Arboretum, of which he is di-
rector, is extremely valuable to his
department. In it, experiments in
acclimatization and soil control
can be performed.,
Strong Trees Developed
"One of our most interesting
experiments," he continued, "was
acclimatization of the Cedar of
Lebanon trees to the Michigan
climate." The trees, which are na-
tive to Syria, had to be carefully
handled in order to develop a
"strong" enough tree to stand
Ann Arbor's relatively cold cli-
mate.
The People working. on the pro-
ject gathered seeds from cedars
growing on the tops of mountains,
which were already somewhat
used to the cold. These seeds were
transported to America, where
they were grown in Boston. The
Boston climate, Prof. Whittemore
explained was b e t w e e n the
warmth of Syria and coolness of
Ann Arbor. Seeds from the trees
in Boston were hardy enough to
prosper were sent to Ann Arbor.,
These trees have grown success-
fully, he continued, and his de-
partment also developed a tech-
nique by which sprigs of one of

these cedars can be cut and used
to create another cedar. "It is too
early to tell," he added, "whether
or not these plants will develop
seeds which will be acclimatized
to Ann Arbor weather.
Handles Soil Problems
Prof. Whittemore has done
some interesting work in soil prob-
lems. "The two most difficult
types of soil to deal with are sand
and clay." He found that clay
could be made into better soil
by adding black swamp mud to it.
Sand, he found, could be improved
by adding humus.
Prof. Whittemore's hobby is
m o u n t a i n climbing. "Some
people," he explained, "are some-
what surprised to hear that I
mountain climb. They seem con-
cerned that I maight have a heart
attack, but if one gets in condi-
tion, just as an athlete does; there
is no danger in it." Prof. Whitte-
more has climbed several of Amer-
ica's highest mountains, including
Mts. Whitney and Rainier.

PROF. WHITTEMORE
.. . landscape architect

SERVING 50 CITIES in 8 STATES

O PROP DRIVE-IN70S
FREE DELIVERY
THIS COUPON is good for 25c SAVING
on any medium or large PIZZA-
any time from Mon., May26 to Thurs., May 29 k

1I

BIKE
STORAGE
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With Us During Vacation
CAMPUS BIKE

ii

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514-16 E.

Williams

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Continuous
From
I P.M.

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DIAL
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rotth

also HEDY LAMARR in "THE FEMALE ANIMAL"
Wednesday
"GOD'S LITTLE ACRE"

11

pr

NOW

Their earthy passions clash in
monsoon-swept exotic Thailand!

DIAL
NO 2-313

TIME ... NOW!

I

PLACE ... HERE !
CHARACTERS ... JESSE and FRANK MOTH
JESSE-No sense landing here, Frank. All the Woolens are in BOX
STORAGE AT TROJAN.
FRANK-I thought storage was expensive.
JESSE-It used to be, but now ANYONE can have a GIANT BOX
full of woolens stored for only $4.95 AT TROJAN.
FRANK-Good Grief ! Looks like we moths are in for one rough summer.
Just call and have your TROJAN DRIVER drop off a large storage
box. When you have filled it at your convenience, we will pick it up.
It will then be stored in Trojan's safe, air conditioned vault for $4.95
plus, of course, the regular cleaning charge.

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