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May 25, 1958 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-05-25
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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Y L

LATEST IN MYSTERY:

Offerings Old and New
Reflect. Psychological Tr end

Would Help To Promote Greater

By VERNON NAHRGANG
FOR MYSTERY fans, the cur-
rent offerings of publishers are
showing an even stronger trend to-
ward the psychological rather than
the logical and toward elucidation
of the detective's life and charac-
ter rather than the criminal's or
victim's. Three new books and a
new omnibus of reprint novels re-
flect this movement with vigor.
THE LONG SKELETON. By

Frances and Richard Lockridge.
J. B. Lippincott Co.
Mr. and Mrs. North move in-
to a hotel while painters invade
their apartment, and, of course,
they find a body in the new quar-
ters. But the dead TV personality
is only the first of three bodies
that the Norths come across in
their newest adventure, The Long
Sk leton.
As usual, a Jaunt with Pam and
Jerry is a lively experience, and

IT'S OUR TURN TO BUY!

Sell All of Your
BOOKS
for
CAS H
at
SLATER'S
YOUR COLLEGE BOOKSTORE

this one, with the time-honored
blustering flatfoot (a deputy chief
inspector) who can't get used to
seeing Mrs. North at the scene of
a crime, provides the customary
wisecracks and laughs.
While the inspector tries to con-
trol his blood pressure, however,
Mrs. North has moved ahead to
keep up with her husband and
their friend Bill Weigand in track-
ing down the killer in a case 'in-
volving Mr. North's own book-pub-
lishing firm.
The Long Skeleton is a thinly-
populated novel, but those char-
acters who do appear take a live-
ly part in the proceedings. The
"chase" at novel's end is tense
and anxious in true detective-nov-
el tradition.
* * *
SINGING IN THE SHROUDS. By
Ngaio Marsh. Little, Brown and
Co.
This newest novel by one of the
most distinguished of the English
lady mystery writers is built on
psychological interpretation rath-
er than logical deduction from the
~verybeginning. It explores the
small passenger list on a cargo
ship and finds a disturbed killer.
Roderick Alleyn of Scotland
Yard, also one of England's dis-
tinguished detectives, forsakes the
heavy emphasis on police proced-
[ure he relied on in earlier novels
and spends some time analyzing
his suspects psychologically.
The result is not too convincing.
The amount of evidence that piles
up is very little, and the solution,
without much manipulating, could
come out quite differently.
Yet this story of a singing kill-

er (dubbed by the newspapers the
Flower Murderer) is a swift-mov-
ing tale with enough twists and
suspects to keep the reader in the
dark to the very end. Meanwhile,
that reader is treated to a more
intimate look at Alleyn's own life,
an extra bonus for long-time Ngaio
Marsh fans.
* . *
FOUR, FIVE AND SIX BY TEY.
By Josephine Tey. Macmillan
Co.
Another in the "Murder Revis-
ited" series, Four, Five and Six by.
Tey is a collection of 1951 and .1952
Josephine Tey novels featuring
Detective Inspector Alan Grant,
The Daughter of Time, The Sing-
ing Sands and A Shilling for
Candles.
Author Tey's mysteries rank
high in quality of writing. In The
Singing Sands, the reader is
treated to a holiday in Scotland
that is quiet and relaxing as well
as pleasantly descriptive-and; of
course, backed up with an air -of
mystery.
Like the other two novels, The
Singing Sands has a thin plot line
and no superfluous characters; but

it also has several fine, ironic
twists unseen in spite of the
straighforward telling of the
story. Inspector Grant, as a per-
son, takes up much of the book
with his own life and illness.
This Tey trio of very readable
novels is an entertainment bargain
for all mystery fans.
* * *
DEAD TO THE WORLD. By Stew-
art Sterling. J. B. Lippincott Co.
"A Gil Vine 'investigation," the
dust jacket reads, and that's just
what Dead to the World is. Fast-
paced throughout, this narrative
by a hotel's head security officer
never pauses for breath but spins
merrily, bloodi1y to the final
showdown through a series of
shootings and questionings.
The inner workings of a big-city
swahk hotel are again brought to
light as a waiter and a guest meet
death under curious circumstances
and police officers suspect the se-
curity officer of troublemakeing.
Very much like some of the ear-
ly Michael Shayne stories, this Gil
Vine investigation is perhaps a
little faster-paced but not quite
as burdened with shootings, beat-
ings and blondes.

(Continued from Page 4)
Instance, has established a feud
with Washington State, just across
the state line. This competition
has come to mean as much to
State students as battles with
Washington. Oklahoma has built
up a vendetta against Texas; Colo-
rado against Oklahoma.
In the Midwest, many rivalries
exist. For many years this state
has had only one really major
power, the arch-rival was Ohio
State. The distance from Ann Ar-
bor to Columbus is formidablefor
car-less students, and therefore
frequent acts of violence have been
the exception rather than the rule.
The rise of Michigan State pre-
sents a possibility which has yet
to be exploited.
Simple football rivalries alone do
not make school spirit, but they,
do help. There are other factors,
equally important, without which
school spirit withers on the vine.
ENERALLY,the smaller a
school, the greater the spirit.
There develops in a small school a
camaraderie and a feeling of soli-
darity which comes quickly to the
surface on any possible occasion.
Thus Wabash and De Pauw, in
Indiana, have a rivalry that out-
does anything in the Big Ten in
intensity. And Carleton and St.
Olaf, located in the same small
Minnesota town, go at it hammer
and tongs whenever the chance
arises. A freshman class which per-
mits its bonfire to be lit before
The Game is hooted for the next
four years.
This "smallness" need only be
relative. Northwestern is easily the
shrimp of the Big'Ten conference,
though large by Eastern standards.
As a :result, the student body is
more active in displaying spirit
than any other conference school.
Michigan students can testify to
this after last fall's football game,
when Northwesterners rode the
streets in convertibles and cheered
themselves hoarse during the
game.
School spirit often persists in
spite of size. Syracuse furnishes
a good example of this. It would,
not be out of place sizewise in the
Big Ten, but the rivalry with Col-

gate, begun when both were small,
still persists. In addition, the area
has a lack of large schools, forcing
Syracuse to come in contact with
little, high-spirited colleges. Their
spirit rubs off on Syracuse.
T MAY ALSO BE said, with ex-
ceptions, that a relationship ex-
ists between alcohol consumption
and school spirit. Schools in New
York, with its 18-year-old drink-
ing law, have spirit to beat the
band. In small towns, which have
no other "things to do" besides
movies and taverns, spirit flows in
the streets on weekends.
Virginia, which is often consid-
ered the "drinkingest" school in
the country, has had-its spirit
written up in national magazines.
Virginia is almost unique, how-
ever, in that it combines the East-
ern nearness to other schools with
a special "gentlemanly drinking"
tradition of the Old South. It
has the best of two worlds-and
tremendous spirit.
Dartmouth, too, has been able to
maintain spirit, in the face of
near-isolation in the wilds of New
Hampshire, with the aid of a lib-
eral amount of student drinking.
In the Big Ten, Wisconsin, despite
the twin handicaps of large size
and distance from rivals, has de-
veloped a notable spirit by means
of the state law permitting beer
to be sold to 18-year-olds. If it
has to, spirit can thrive on beer.
WEALTHIER schools also seem
to have more spirit. In the
East, the major schools are pri-
vate, with correspondingly higher
tuition. It takes more money to
enter these schools and a feeling of
aristocracy-or at least timocracy
-can develop. This by itself does
not create school spirit, but it can
reinforce it.
Northwestern, being the only
private school in the Big Ten, has
this advantage over its rivals; as
does Stanford on the Pacific
Ooast, Vanderbilt in the South and
Rice in the Southwest.
State universities are thus at a
further, though slight, disadvan-
tage. In addition, the presence of
large out-of-state minorities at
most state universities deprives the
student body of the feeling that it

consists of and represents the peo-
ple of the state-a possible source
of school spirit.
The original founders can con-7
tribute in another way to schooll
spirit. John Purdue, Ezra Cornell
and Cornelius Vanderbilt are cele-
brated in song and story. It is,

RUNNING RIOTS:
How It's Done in Easter

(Continued from Page 4)
thing had been thought
months in advance.

out

SINCE 1954 FIRE:
Improvement Noted
In Student Housing

much easier to wax enthusiastic
with a chorus of "Lord Jeffrey Am-
herst was a'soldier of great fame"
than to praise the Michigan state
legislature in similar fashion.
All these factors, sometimes to-
gether and sometimes singly, grad-
ually tend to develop a school spir-

RIOTS fail here simply because
they are never planned, and
left mostly up to the mindless mob;
for execution.
There are three requisites for a
successful riot.
1) The riot must have a reason;
for being. There is a French phraset
for this, so it must be apt. One
cannot riot for nothing. One must
protest something, whether it be
Union food, dorm food, ugly wom-
en, or. Richard Nixon. It is hope-
less to attempt to get up a really
good riot-like spirit if you are
only going to let it die for lack of
a cause.
2) The riot must be planned.
The fuses must be tapped and the
wires hidden. The -water mains
must be located and trustworthy
men placed at the spigots. The
charges must be carefully set. Pass
keys must be obtained. Watchmen
bribed. Potential informers put
out of the way (painlessly, of
course).
3) The riot must be well run.
There must be no needless damage
to inflame public opinion against
the rioters.
With these goals in mind, let
us consider a potential but hypo-
thetical riot, and how one might
bring it about.
FOR THE sixty-fifth consecutive
night, a certain student-sup-
ported, red-brick eatery on State
Street has served raw sewage in
the student special. A group of

gastric cases gathers at midnight
in the bellfry of Burton tower to
plan action. Perhaps twenty men
form- the nucleus of the action,.
with more to follow.
Next day, at noon, the cafeteria
is the peaceful scene it always is
at this time; just a roomful of
people slowly and cautiously eat-
ing.
Then, bedlam. Twenty men
simultaneously throw their trays
to the floor, shouting: "Whoever
eats this, help." A brass band rises
from a few booths and plays,

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(Continued from Page 11)
of years in advance based on rough
enrollment estimates made by the
schools and colleges. But the esti-
mates are approximate and fre-
quently prove incorrect.
ESTIMATES made for the period
of 1957-61 have already been
substantially revised. The 1,200
space Mary Markley dormitory will
be opened this fall as planned.
But the first 1,200 space unit of
the North Campus Residence Hall,
scheduled to be opened in 1959,
has been put off until 1960. And
the second unit, also providing
1,200-spaces, has been postponed
+a year until 1962.
Three-hundred apartment units
are expected to be completed on
North Campus in 1959 and in 1961.
It is believed that some of this
building might be speeded up if
the housing situation again be-

came serious in the next few years.
But next year University enroll-
ment will have to stay at this
year's level of 22,815 because of a
shortage in University operating
funds. It was hoped by adminis-
trators that enrollment might be
increased to 25,000 but the Michi-
gan Legislature sharply cut the
1958-59 budget request making
this impossible.
Similar action by the Legisla-
ture in the future could again
hamper efforts at expanding en-
rollment. This year enrollment
did not reach its estimated peak.
University officials attributed the
error mainly to the recession which
they said made it financially im-
possible for many students to at-
tend college.
These figures point out the flexi-
bility of enrollment and indicate
how a sharp change upward or
downward can affect the local
housing situation.

STUDY 01
for EX
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4 "K

SUMMER STORAGE

on Wool Blankets

Famous Jantzen under-water
plaids. The zesty red-and-
yellow miniature Clooney
tartan done in quick-drying

Pillows 0

cotton poplin will be the
big favorite this year. These
boxers are designed for both-
comfort and split-second
sports action.
28 to 44 sizes 4.95.

Pay only the
regular laundry
charge -next fall
call

Bedspreads
44 I.r
--4-, r ,~

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" to M +,.v sp
: N 4 , .tis '
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Fredelest ur o

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fi! '. y .,1#5 Nns :+
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£

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NO 3-4185 for pickup
KYER MODEL LAUNDRY-
& CLEANERS

fashion, fun

n Italian playshoes whose leather thongs a

Wild's

a bare maximum of air conditioning. . .with faper pants, cotton skirts, swim suits..
suammer sun. a. natural T-strap sandal 8.98 b. champagne or white sandal 10.91
c. metal-trimmed coral 10.98 d. natural straw mule on a high cork wedge 10.91
e.,white-red-and-blue sandal 10.98 f. fringed natural leather thong 'sandal 8.91

I

STATE STREET
)N THE CAMPU

815 South State
601 East Williams

1021 EastAnn
627 South Main

NO 3-4185

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