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May 17, 1958 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-05-17

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, MAY 17,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, MAY 17,

idents Train Talents in Gamma DeltaI

ROTC:
All Units
To March
In Parade
President Dwight D. Eisenhower
has proclaimed today Armed
Forces Day.
All across the nation, military
units are demonstrating , the
armed might of the United States
as they make their annual mili-
tary report to the nation.
Ann Arbor will feature a parade
of 16 units beginning today at 11
a.m. All University ROTC units
will participate, as well as special
units, the Pershing Rifles Drill
Team, the Air Force Drill Team,
and the ROTC Band composed of
all units - Army, Air Force and
Marines.
Forming at Yost Field House,
the paiade will move north on
State St. to Huron St. west on
Huron to Main St., north to Pack-
ard, and east from Packard to
State St.
Other special events for Univer-
sity ROTC units will be the An-
nual Awards Review today at 9:15
a.m. at the freshman field, near
Yost Field House, and an open
house at Navy ROTC headquar-
ters in North Hall from 1 to 4 p.'m.
'U' To Hold
This summer, 44 summer school
freshmen will be junior banking
executives.
The executives are enrolling at
the University's Schoolof Bank-
ing, June 22 to July 4.
A group of sophomores who at-
tended the school last year will
finish up their studies this year
from July 6 to 18.
Both groups will hear classroom
lectures by business administra-
tion school faculty members and
leaders of the state banking pro-
fession.
They will spend about four or
five hours in school a day plus
an equal amount of time doing
homework.
Prof. Douglas Hayes of the
business administration school
and Ralph Stickle, executive sec-
retary of the Michigan Bankers
Association are co-directors of the
school. The school itself is co-
sponsored by the MBA.- ,\
Other business administration
faculty members who will take
part in the school are Dean Rus-
sell A. Stevenson, Prof. Gerald
Dykstra, Prof. Samuel Hepworth
and Prof. C. James Pilcher.

. « ._

COLLEGE ROUNDUP

---_

By NAN MARKEL
ITHACA, N.Y. - The Cornell
President's Committee on Student
Activities began discussion last
week on proposals which may lead
to a general ban on unchaperoned
apartment parties.
The President's Committee has
been reviewing regulations for the
past two weeks. A member of the
committee indicated in an article
in the Daily Sun that any liberali-
zation of the apartment party
rules is not likely.
Review of the code "is all part
of the whole attempt to review
the social situation at the univer-
sity," the committee's chairman
said. Other observers, the chair-
nian explained, have expressed
the feeling that rules at Cornell
have deteriorated.
* * *
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. - Harvard
administrators have closed that
school's Iroquois Club until June
4 as a result of a bombing prank
at a local delicatessen.
A bomb was thrown into the
building by two Club members
who fled into the Club afterward.
No one was seriously injured in
the explosion, but 'two persons
were taken to the infirmary with
minor lacerations.
CAMBIUDGE, Mass. - Dean
Leighton of Harvard last week
announced that a plan to ban
student cars is "perfectly pos-
sible."
Although the number of under-
graduate cars ticketed in the cur-
rent overnight parking campaign
declined recently, Leighton felt
that further action is still neces-
sary.
"I d'on't want to see anyone
leave Harvard for parking viola-
tions," Leighton maintained. A
ban on student cars would be, he
noted, an obvious way to reduce
violations.
N ** *
SYRACUSE, N.Y. - A graduate
student protested against the mili-
tarism evident in an ROTC review
parade last Tuesday.
The student stated, in an inter-
view with the Daily Orange, that
her purpose was not to make a
demonstration or to fight with
anybody; she is "just opposed" to
a military show of strength.
"Marching is exciting and has
an appeal in and of itself," she
said, "but at every military parade
there ought to be at least one
person protesting."
"The purpose oftan armynis to
wage war; it is the training of
young men to kill," she added. "I
wish they didn't want to play
soldier."
* * ,
EUGENE, Ore. -- A University
of Oregon professor recently sug-
gested higher grade requirements
for student officers to help those

students bridge the gap between
their potential and actual scholas-
tic achievement.
Suggested additions include a
broader foreign language require-
ment and fewer "how" courses
and more "pure learning" courses,
and a grade requirement to bring
a car to school.
DETROIT - Wayne State Uni-
versity has defeated a proposed
quarter system.
Increased registration, book-
keeping and financial costs were.
some of the reasons cited against
the proposal.
"It takes my class sixteen weeks
to get started anyway," said one
WSU Council member, as quoted
in the Daily Collegian.
Another objection was that
"students and instructors can't
get acquainted in such a short se-
mester."

EVANSTON, Ill. -In a poll an-
nounced last Tuesday, an honor
system was found to be inaccept-
able to sixty per cent of the stu-
dents at Northwestern University.
Of the 155 students who said
they would not support an honor
systei, 121 said they objected to
the proposed provision requiring
students to report other students
whom they suspected of cheating.
* * *
PAMBRIDGE, Mass. - A re-
vised upperclass curriculum will
go into effect at Harvard next
fall.
Revisions will place a greater
emphasis on tutorial and inde-
pendent study, increase the' par-
ticipation of senior faculty mem-
bers in, tutorial work, and widen
the gap between Honors and non-
Honors programs.

Frog-nik
The 32nd annual Calaveras
County Frog Jumping Contest
will be held at the Calaveras
County Fair Grounds just out-
side Algels Camp, California
sometime next week.
Some 200 frogsfrom 20dif-
ferent countries have already
arrived for the international
frog jump commemorating
Mark Twain's short story, "The
Celebrated Jumping Frog of
Calaveras County."
The frogs are placed on a
launching pad of burlap and
make three jumps to record
their official distance.
Among this year's contest-
ants are "Rolli," a Swedish
contestant, but a doubtful
starter in view of the discovery
that she is about to lay eggs;
"Won Long -Hop," a Formosan
entrant; "Monsoon," entered
by an exchange student from
India; and "Pituitary."

Come to Churchy

F7

The Autumn Issue
SOLD OUT!
The Winter Issue
SOLDOUT!

THE THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY
IN ANN ARBOR
106 East Liberty, 2ND FLOOR
Public Discussion, Wednesday, 8:00 P.M.
Listen to Radio Theosophy, Sundays, 12:15 P.M.
WPAG (1050 kc).
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
10:00 A.M. Meeting for Worship.
10:00 A.M. Sunday School.
11:30 A.M. Meeting for Worship
11:30 A.M. Adult Study Class.
CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1131 Church St.
Dr. E. H. Palmer, Minister
9:30 A.M. U. Bible Class.
10:30 A.M. "The Epistle to the Philippians. VI.
Exhortation to Steadfastness."
7:00 P.M. "The Ten Commandments. VI. Jesus'
View Towards Murder."
PRESBYTERIAN STUDENT.CENTER
at the FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
Rev. William S. Baker, Campus Minister
Miss Patricia Pickett, Assistant
SUNDAY-
Morning Worship 9:00, 10:30, and 12:00-Dr.
Kuizenga.
10:30 A.M. Semin-ar on "Christian Beliefs."
1 1:30 A.M. Coffee Hour.
5:45 P.M. Snack Supper.
7:00 P.M. Forum-"Reminiscences of a For-
eign Student."
FRIDAY-.
6:15 P.M. Picnic and Elections. ,
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sp'onsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. NO 5-2665; Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 Morning Service.
7:00 Evening Service.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State & Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor
8:45 and 11:00 Mr. Eric Fife, special speaker.
10:00 A.M. Sunday School.
5:45 P.M. Student Guild.
7:00 P.M. Evening Service Sermon, "Contrary
Winds and Why They Blow."
Wednesday, 7:30 P.M. Prayer Meeting.
WE WELCOME YOU.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
and STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(ThedLutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Ronald L. Johnstone, Vicar
Sunday at 9:15 and at 10:45: Worship Services,
with sermon by the vicar, "Your Mission Min-
istry."
Sunday at 2:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, meets at Center to go to Bishop Lake for
joint outing with MSU Gamma Deltans.
Wednesday at 6:00: Married Couples Potluck Sup-
per.
Wednesday at 8:00: Chapel Assembly meeting.
ST. NICHOLAS' ORTHODOX CHURCH
414 N. Main St.
Rev. Fr. Andrew Missiras, Pastor
Saturday Evening-Vespers 8:00 P.M.
Sunday Services-Matins 9:30 A.M.
Divine Liturgy (in Greek) 10:30 A.M. to 12 noon.

LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill at S. Forest
Rev. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
Gerald Kissell, Intern
Sunday-
9:00 & 11:00 A.M. Worship Services
10:00 A.M. Bible Study
Note: No. L.S.A. Meeting because of Retreat.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister.
9:45 A.M. Church School.
10:45 A.M. Sermon by Russell Fuller: "Let the
Children Come."
THE CONGREGATIONAL AND DISCIPLES
STUDENT GUILD
J. Edgar Edwards, Director
524 Thomson St.
Donna Hamilton, Associate
The Student Guild will have cakes, records, and
discussion on: "The Poets Speak Relevantly
Too." Disciples Church at 7:00 P.M.
MONDAY-
6:00 Grad Group at Guild House.
TUESDAY-
4:30-6:00 Coffee Break at Guild House.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. Sunday Morning Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday, Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street. Reading room hours are: Mon-
day 11:00 A.M. to 8:30 P.M. Tuesday - Sat-
urday 11:00 A.M. to 5 P.M. Sunday 2:30 to
4:30 P.M.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Merril R. Abbey, L. Burlin Main, William B.
Hutchison, Eugene A. Ransom, ministers.
9:00 and 11:00 A.M. Worship: "Made of Imper
ishable Stuff," Dr. Merrill R. Abbey.
5:30 P.M. Fellowship Supper.
7:00 P.M. Installation of officers and cabinet
members. Panel discussiongon: "Implications
of- Continued Bomb-testing."
Welcome to Wesley Foundation. Rooms open
daily.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
L. C. Utley, Minister
SUNDAYS: 10:00, 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.;
WEDNESDAYS: 7:30 P.M.
Television: Sundays 2:30 P.M., Channel 6.
Lansing.
Radio: Sundays 5:30 P.M. WXYZ 1270
For transportation to services Dial NO 3-8273.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister
Worship services at 9:30 and 11:00 with Dr.
Luchs "EVER GET DEPRESSED?" Bible Lec-
ture at 10:20 by Mrs. Luchs.
CHURCH SCHOOL at 11:00. Supervision for Pre-
school 9:30 & 1 1:00.
WEDNESDAY MORNING DEVOTIONAL STUDY
9:30, Mayflower Room.
STUDENT GUILD 7:00 Disciples Church: Cakes,
records, and discussion on "The Poets Speak
Relevantly Too." (Life in Fine Arts).
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw at Berkshire
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M. Unitarian Adult Group. Discussion:
"Does Ann Arbor Need a Medical Care Plan?"
11:00 A.M. Service of Worship. Sermon by Rev.
Edward H. Redman on: "Education For Liv-
ing."
12:15 P.M. Coffee Hour.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH.
502 East Huron
Rev. Hugh Pickett, Minister
Mrs. Beth Mahone, Assistant Student Counselor
9:45 A.M. The Student Bible Class will discuss
"How does one find the Will of God?"
11:00 A.M. Morning Worship-Mr. Pickett's top-
ic will be "By Might Alone."

. ,

Now watch for the Spring Issue
of

I

GENERATION

the University Inter-Arts Magazine

Fiction
* Poetry
* Music

" Parody
" Photography
* Essay
"'Art

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and sermon fol-
lowed by breakfast and discussion in Canter-
bury House.
11:00 A.M. MorningPrayer and Sermon.
5:30 P.M. Buffet Supper.
6:30 P.M. Guest Speaker, Mr. Joseph Heffernan,
graduate student in social work, "Can a Chris-
tian Be Against the Church?"

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