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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 17, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-05-17

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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..H.E MI. CHI..Gs~w A N U&II os~ .V c. a: A i'I'.1AY 7 nwv 4m

17,7

idies Mysteries of Insect Language

SGC Group
To Publish
Book Guide
The Student Government Coun-
cil Readingand Discussion Com-
mittee is ready to offer students
"guided outside reading" for the
summer, Roger Seasonwine, '61,
member of the committee states.
All University students are urged
to use the reading list of books
from the period of the 1920's. The
list covers five viewpoints of the
period: political, historical, eco-
nomic, literary, and sociological.
Sign-up lists for the program
will be in the residence halls,
sororities, and fraternities by May
21. Any other students interested
may contact Mrs. Ruth T. Calla-
han, administrative assistant to
the Dean of Men, Student Activi-
ties Building. The committee hopes
to have an estimate of the student
interest by May 25.'
Program Informal
Emphasizing the informality of.
the program, Seasonwein said that"
early in the fall semester a panel
discussion will be held by faculty
from. each of these fields.
At present, Prof. George A. Peek,
Jr. of the political science depart-
ment, Prof. Theodore M. Newcomb
of the sociology department, Prof.
Edwin A. Engel of the English de-
partment, and Prof. Harold M.
Levinson of the economics depart-
ment have consented to work with!
the program.
Committee Chose Books
The committee, Seasonwein
states, has chosen the basic books
for the list. These are: Frederick
L. Allen's "Only Yesterday," Ar-
thus J. Schlessinger's "Crisis of
the Old Order," two plays byt
Eugene O'Neill, novels by F. Scotte
Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, orc
Sinclair Lewis, and a criticism by
H. L. Mencken, as well as poetryc
by Wallace Stevens. "The Twen-
ties," by Frederick J. Hoffman willy
also be included.
LawMethods

Stage Managing 'Worst' Job
In Theatre, Weaver Says

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Second Semester

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By JEAN HARTWIG

Stagemanaging is the "worst job
in the theater," acording to Wil-
liam Weaver, stage manager for
the 1958 Drama Season.
"The stage manager is respon-
sible to both the producer and
director," he continued. "He must
maintain the production level set
by the director and also be aware
that the actors have to create that
level at each performance."
Weaver began his show business
career when a friend asked him to
appear in a small play in his Ohio
hometown. From there he toured
with a stock company in which
he drove the car, packed the truck,
changed the sets and did "practi-
cally everything you can imagine."
Directed Summer Show
After a five-year stint in the
armed services, he returned to
New York where he acted in sev-
eral productions including "Pick-
Up Girl" and "Magnificent Yan-
kee" with Louis Calhern. During
this time he also directed a sum-
mer theater show starring Ann
Harding and ZaSu Pitts.
The "Four Poster," starring
Jessica Tandy and Hume Cronyn,
was his first experience as a stage
Instrument,
Tel~kst ed 'U'
By ROBERT JUNKER

manager. "When Cronyn sold the
New York play and stipulated that
I manage it, whammo! It hit me.
I had never stagemanaged before
in my life."
The cast rehearsed in a YMCA
gymnasium. Director Jose Ferrer
"polished" the action, but "we all
put in our two cents worth or
more," according to Weaver.
Plans Tour
Weaver, who has just finished
directing and acting in a produc-
tion of "Chalk Garden" starring
Judith, Anderson and Kathleen
Nesbit, is now working on a new
script of "Midnight Sun" for the
fall. During the remainder of the
summer he plans to direct Rudy
Vallee on tour with "The Happiest
Millionaire."
In comparing acting with direct-
ing, he said he preferred acting "in
a juicy role," but "with an exciting
play and a stimulating cast, di-
recting is really exciting."
Costs High
Due to the high cost of pro-
duction, Weaver believes the
"theater has a large amount of
commercialism in it now. I don't
know if it's the age or the fact
that we're a comparatively young
nation, but the poor standards of
'bill-paying" television acting are
an example.
"If you are blessed with working
in an 'honest' play, and not a metre
shallow work, the audience will
recognize it," he said. "Audiences
should reject everything else."
Weaver, who will manage the
next production of the Drama
Season, "The Second Man," star-
ring Vicki Cummings and Hurd
Hatfield, concluded his discussion
with "There's nothing as exciting
as a good play."
Late Show TONIGHT
at i1 P.M.
DIA NO D-3136
Starts TODAY!

EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
HORACE HR ACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIE
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC'

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May 30 to June 10, 1958
For courses having both lectures and recitations the "Time
of Class" is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitation only, the "Time of Class" is the time
of the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined
at special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there
is no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict, the conflict
is resolved by the class which conflicts with the regular schedule.
Degree candidates having a scheduled examination on June
7, 9 and 10 will be given an examination at an earlier date. The
following schedule designates an evening time for each such
examination. The instructor may 4rrange with the student for
an alternate time, with notice to the scheduling committee.'

Regular
Exam
Time
Special
Period

Evening Schedule for ltgree Candidates
Sat., June 7 Sat., June 7 Tues., Tues.,
Mon., June 9 Mon., June 9 June 10 June 10
9-12 A.M. 2-5 P.M. 9-12 AM. 2-5 P.M.
Mo June 2 Tues.,Ju 3 W ., June 4 Thurs.,

-
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.

Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination.
REGULAR SCHEDULE

btuUy Benaviorai nfluences_
'Composition of the sounddis
scribe the sound in detail and C
analyze all its components. This -Prof. Shartel
f leads directly to the study of what
physical characteristics of sounds Jn
influences animal behavior," Alex- Jurisprudencedthestudy of legal
ander said. methods and proceduces) has been
Hndedha tthe special interest of Prof. Burke
He noted that this type of sound Shartel of the law school who wil
study in insects is being carried on retire at the end of this semester
only at the University in this coun- rtr tteedo hssmse
try, but similar type experiments after 38 years on the University's
are beingonducted in France and aculty.
aEeng cnutdi rneand "Today, our legal thinking and
Alexander received his doctorate methods are just as much in need
in zoology at Ohio State Univer- of change as are those of physics
sityn d ooogya o Sateivdhso-and science generally," Prof. Shar-
sity, and Moore received his doc- tlwhgaehe14-8To s
torate in zoology at the Uniyersity tel, who gave the 1947-48 Thomas
of IllinoisoUM. Cooley lectureship on "Our Le-
gal System and How It Operates,"
stated: "The lawyer understands
Prof. W eeks best how the social control ma-
chinei y of America works. But he
* can't continue to do a good job if
W rites Book the machinery becomes obsolete."
Prof. Shartei maintains that the
"The Commonwealth Vs. Sacco doctrine of precedent is still cloud-
and Vanzetti by Prof. Robert ed, in the public's mind, in "myth."
Weeks, of the engineering college, He says that it has for many
has recently been published. played an important role in policy
The book, "a collection of pri- making, but only within the last
mary source materials," is a de- few decades has it becone the
tailed presentation of the most subject of extensive public discus-
famous criminal trial in American sion.
history. It deals with thedefense "Recent years have been marked
and prosecution of two confessed, not so much by a change in the
anarchists, aliens and draft- doctrine of precedent as they have
dodgers on trial for seven years by a brushing away of fictions to
for a payroll robbery and double the effect that courts don't legis-
murder. late, fictions to the effect that they
Prof. Weeks attended the Uni- simply discover the law, fictions
versity for undergraduate and to the effect that when the courts
graduate studies, receiving his do lay down a new rule, they find
Ph.D. from the University in 1952. that rule in the already existing
He has been teaching here since customs of the community," Prof.
1945. Shartel says.
AUDUBON SCREEN TOUR
MICHIGAN'S MACKINAC BRIDGE
All color feature-length movie on construction
of the Mackinac bridge - also other outstand-
ing scenes of the upper peninsula.
Presented in person by photographer Herman
Ellis.
Tues., May 20, 8 P.M. Adults . . .75c
Ann Arbor High School Auditorium Students . .50c
Ii ___________________________________ jd

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The new seismograph which wasr
developed at the University's En-
gineering Research Institute was
tested recently to determine its
effectiveness in recording earth-
quakes and other blasts.
Prof. James T. Wilson, chairman
of the geology department, ex-
plained that the seismographs,
were located at several stations}
across the country to record the
non-nuclear blast of 1300 tons of
explosives in Vancouver, British
Columbia, early in April.
The explosives were set off to
clear a shipping channel. Prof.
Wilson declared that the test
provided "inconclusive" results.
The station near Spokane, Wash-
ington, recorded good results but
the other stations got weak shock
waves, he said.
Detects Nevada Blast
These results were "not as good
as expected," he said. Th* seismo-
graph; which is tuned to an above-
normal frequency, had previously
detected an underground atomic
blast at the Nevada testing'
grounds.
This seismograph, which picks
up waves of 100 cycles, while, the
usual machine receives only those
cycles below 30, was developed by
a research team headed by Harry
J. Bugajaski, technician at the
Engineering Research Institute, at
the Acoustics Laboratory of ERI.
In recording the higher fre-
quencies, the researchers are try-
ing to find if these wavea are
produced by earthquakes. Similar
equipment to the new seismograph
has been in use for years, Prof.
Miller explained. It is used by
acoustical engineers to, measure
the amount of sound in a room.
Explosions Test Equipment
The researchers will test their
equipment on any big explosion if
they are informed that it is to
take place, Prof. Miller declared.
Ihe machine itself is "riot an
elaborate piece of equipment," he
said.
"Some of the results obtained
vith this equipment were made
)ublic last fall," he mentioned,
'but only since the nuclear tests
have taken place has general in-
erest been shown in it."

MONDAY

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at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at

9
9
10
11
12
1
2
3

Time of Examination

Friday, May 30
Monday, June 2
Tuesday; June 3
Saturday, May 31
Friday, June 6
Friday, June 6
Wednesday, June 4
Friday, June 6
Saturday, May 31
Tuesday, June 3
Friday, May 30
Monday, June 2
Friday, June 6
Thursday, June 5
Thursday, June 5
Wednesday, June,4

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5.
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12

t.
s
,,
rp

at
at
at
at
at
at'
at
at

8
9
10
.11
12
1
2
3

TUESDAY

SPECIAL PERIODS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS

Am m .mw
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0 TECMIRAMA*.CNICOLOR
added
"ALPINE GLORY"
COLORTOON

Botany 2, 122
Chemistry 1, 3, 4, 8, 14, 183
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54, 153
Economics 71, 72
**English 23 (A), 24 (A)
**English 23 (B), 24 (B)
French 1, 2, 11,;12, 22, 31, 32
German 1, 2, 11, 31, 32, 35, 36
Naval Science 102, 202, 302,
402
Psychology 271
Russian 1, 2, 32
Sociology 1, 60
Sociology 271
Spanish 1, 2, 22, 31, 32

Thursday, June 5
Friday, June 6
Thursday, June 5
Wednesday, June 4
Saturday, May 31
Wednesday, June 4
Saturday, June 7
Saturday, June 7
Friday; June 6
Wednesday, June 4
Monday, June 9
Tuesday, June 10
Wednesday, June 4
Monday, June 9

9-12
2-5
2-5
9-12'
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
1-10 p.m.
9-12
2-5
9-12
9-12
9-12

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Bus. Ad. 11, 12t

Wednesday, June 4.

9-12

* Classes beginning on the half hour will be scheduled at the
preceding hour.
* Exam period B is open only to those having a conflict at the
period assigned to Exam A.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

N

NOW

.. ....... -..
s, .; '4(; '
" ' '
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DIAL
Na8-64 16

"2.3 TINES GAYER; THAN BARDOT'S AND I
jGOD CREATED WOMAN "t -Wnstn f.
STARNG SWEDEN'S FOUR MOST' ,r
RELEASED BY RANK flC
WINNR GRND PRIX OR BEST COMEDY - j DSTRBUTRS F
Continuous Show Saturday and Sunday From ]P.M

A.E. 134, 163
C. E. 20
C.E. 52
C.E. 107
C.E. 141
Draw. 1, 22
Draw. 2, 33
Draw. 12
E.E. 5
E.E. 10
E.M. 1
E.M. 2
English 10, 11
I.E. 100, 140
I.E.120
M.E. 2
M.E. 114
Naval Science 102, 202, 302, 402

Saturday, June 7
Tuesday, June 10
Tuesday, June 10
Saturday, June 7
Saturday, June 7
Tuesday, June 10
Saturday, June 7
Saturday, June 7
Friday, June 6
Saturday, June 7
Tuesday, June 10
Monday, June 9
Tuesday, June 10
Friday; June 6.
Monday, June 9
Monday, June 9
Tuesday, June 10
Friday, June 6

2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-3
9-12
9-12
2-5
9-12
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
7-10 p.m.

tCl 1 ' I i; p'j;'
I11iCC1 Il ' Ii111 41111 1 1 Cli{ 1
i i

ENDING TONIGHT
Shows at 1-3-5-7-9 P.M.

Special Instructions
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflicts between
assigned examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
See bulletin board outside Room 301 W.E. between April 15 and
30 for instructions.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit of
the University. For time and place of examinations, see bulletin
board in the School of Music.

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II-M I CLEEO RHTCUEADDSG

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COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN

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