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May 10, 1958 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-05-10

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TBE MI[CMGAN DAILY

SATURDAY,

TINE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY,

iff Advises Completion
education Before Army

WALTER GREEN
people who are deciding
or not to fulfill their,
obligations before enter-
ge should choose to con-
qir formal education, ac-
to Robert E. A. Lillie,
aw County's sheriff.
Lillie, whose own col-;
er suffered a 27 year in-
n, said "A person should
ae education he can dur-
arly, formative years."
1 Pittsburgh, Pa. in 1907,
led in the University of
. in 1925 and after three
s of study he entered the
Corps as 'a private. He
is way through the ranks
retired in June 1954 as a
t colonel.
es Engineering Degree
)lowing September Lillie
his studies he had in-'

Daiy-Robert s;ane
ROBERT E. A.,LILUE
Washtenaw County sheriff.
rupted in 1926 and he received
bachelor's degree 'in electrical
gineering in 1957.
Before b~eing appointed sheriff
t February to fill the term of
late Erwin s. Klager, Lilie
irked as Washtenaw County
ril Defense director.
illie said that on his return
the University he was im-
essed by the "seriousness" of the
dents and the great advances
hieved in the scientific fields
en at the elementary levels.
lie, who made Tau Beta- Phi
d Eta Kappa Nu, explained that
;h his Marine and engineering
ckground helped him perform
duties as sheriff.'
Former Civil Defense Head
'The same orderliness and self-,
cipline necessary for a success-
college life is also necessary
the effective performance of
- duties as sheriff," he said. "My
,rine Corps experience has
ped me in the handling of the
ministration of my depart-
!nt."
sheriff Lillie, when Civil De-
se director, handled the plan-
ag, organization, and imple-
ntation of survival plans and
erations in Washtenaw County
event of natural or manmade
aster.
Civil Defense in the county is
1 organized particularly at the
staff level." he said. Lillie
nmended the high degree of
Lversity participation in the
gram, saying "The University
I especially the University Hos-
al have been a great aid in or-
aizing the Civil Defense pro-
im.
'U' Provides Buses
Che University has amade 21
es available in case of emer-
cy and provisions have been

made for the conversion of dor-
mitories into additional hospital
space.
The warning system throughout
the University is good. Sheriff
Lillie pointed out that "'U" stu-
dents man the ground observer
post atop the Union tower and he
praised the University's radar sys-
tem located at Willow Run which
is effective in warning both of
military and natural dangers.
Sheriff Lillie commended the
efforts of Washtenaw County in
dealing with Juvenile Delinquen-
cy. "Criminal, remedial; and pre-
ventive policy are handled by a
youth bureau which works closely
with the probate court. The Youth
Bureau is jointly operated by the
law enforcement agencies in the
county," he said.
Keeps Record on Men
Sheriff. Lillie does not believe
that the presence of the Univer-
sity in the area has any unilue
effect on law enforcement. He
said, "The University contributes
liberally in personnel and funds
to the maintenance of order
among students."
Sheriff Lillie has instituted the
system of keeping a complete pro-
fessional record on each man in
his department. These "fitness"
reports are written by the man's
immediate superior and turned in
at the end of each 90 days of serv-
ice. Reference is made to these re-
ports in regard to promotions.
Another innovation introduced
by Lillie is the establishment of
high qualification standards in
the handling and firing of fire-
arms by the men in his depart-
ment. Lillie would also like to see
a more uniform level of proficien-
cy required of all applicants for
driver's licenses.
The sheriff's department, in ad-
dition to its many other jobs, stu-
dies road conditions and makes
speed limit, recommendations.
"Our major interest is getting
the maximum law enforcement
from the budget assigned to us by
Washtenaw County," Sheriff Lil-
lie concluded.
Shot Protects
Mother, Child
From Polio
Polio shots given to pregnant
women also help protect their
children from this disease, Prof.
Gordon C. Brown of the public
health school said recently.
Prof. Brown said that studies of
142 mothers-to-be showed that
the benefits of vaccination were
passed on to their children for as
long as three months after birth.
While doctors have long sus-
pected the Salk vaccine might
have carry-over value for infants,
Prof. Brown's study was the first
laboratory confirmation of this
belief.
Prof. Brown reported that the
higher the level of protection giv-
en to prospective mothers, the
greater and longer lasting was the
protection for their children, and
that the polio protection thus giv-
en children diminshed steadily as
they grew older.
Brown's research indicated that
parents can now insure continuous
protection against polio for their
children from the moment of
birth. This can b done if prospec-
tive mothers receive the complete
series of three shots and start
vaccinations for their children at
age three months.

Install New
Club Officers
Newly elected officers of the
Women's Physical Education Club
were installed at a coffee hour
yesterday morning at the Wo-
men's Athletic Building. -
The new officers are: Eleanor
Guthrie, '59 Ed., president; Kay
Weaver, '59 Ed., vice-president;
Elaine Lander, '61, secretary;
Pamela Magoon, '59Ed., treasurer;
Sally Query, '60 Ed., big-little sis-
,ter chairman; and Cecille Dum-
bridge, '60 Ed., and Margaret
Platner, '60 Ed., p u b l i c i t y co-
chairman.
During the school year, the
Physical Education club sponsors
several activities, including a
faculty-parent tea, modern dance
program, high school play day, an
orientation breakfast and a serv-
ice project.
India Students
Hold Banquet
Indian food and entertainment
will be featured at the "Spring
Frolic," a banquet to be held at
R7 p.m. today in Lane Hall by the
India Students Association.
Songs and dances typical of In-
dia will be presented by Indian
students, according to Virendra
Pathik, Spec., president of the As-
sociation.

By NAN MARKEL
EVANSTON, Lllinois -Student
Governing Board at Northwestern
University last week took a first
step in regulating over-participa-
tion in extra-curricular activities.
It recommended a normal max-
imum range of 10 to 15 hours a
week per person participation for
all students. The recommenda-
tion is to be inserted in the stu-
dent handbook as an advisory
regulation.
s "s*
MINNEAPOLIS, Minnesota -
The Minnesota Conference of the
National Association for the Ad-
vancement of Colored People is
considering a - taxpayer's suit
against the University of Minne-

sota as a state institution which
recognizes campus organizations
"having 'written bias clauses in
their constitutions."
"We wouldn't try to legislate
morality," said Minnesota NAACP
President Rev. Denzil Carty as
quoted in the Minnesota Daily.
"We just feel that any state in-
stitution should be the last place
to recognize segregation."
"The basic principle applies in
any area - including University
housing," he added.
* * *
MOUNT CLEMENS, Michigan
- A report from officials of Cen-
tral Michigan college indicates
that a long waiting list has
formed for a three hour course
in fishing.I

Final Touches Added

COLLEGE ROUNDUP

. Stressed in the course are such
things as when to use what type
of bait, how to cast and how to
tie flies and make lures. About
half the course consists of prac-
tice casting on the fieldhouse
floor.
One official commenting on the
course asked: "Who ever heard
of a college graduate not knowing
how to fish?"
CHICAGO, Illinois - Seventy-
two per cent of the men in col-
leges across the country, and ,84
per cent of the women, favor the
Democratic party to win the 1960
Presidential elections, according
to a recent Associated Collegiate
press poll.

U.

Come

to Church

I

-Daily-Fred Shippey
A&D OPEN HOUSE-Carol-Herndon puts the finishingtouches on
an oil painting in preparation for the school's open house. Exhibits
will be open to viisitors all weekend. Students participating in the
University DwT program will be the school's guests today.

r1

Sunday

1

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-, (By the Author of "Ratty Round the Flag, Boys!"and,
"Barefoot Boy wilk Cheek.")

1 t

L...

STA RT
YOUR
VACATION
/ ~ THE
9MARI
WAY
ravelp nyozr
mewo lo fAM
n7o Caf~s/
COACH PARTY FARES
save each person in your group
of 25 or more 28%o of regular
round-trip fare.

5-
SWEENEY IN THE TREES
Spring is here-the season of tree-sitting contests. This I ap-
plaud. Tree-sitting is healthful and jolly and as American as
apple pie. Also it keeps you off the streets.
Tree-sitting is not, however, without its hazards. Take, for
example, the dread and chilling case of Manuel Sigafoos and
Ed Sweeney, both sophomores at the Nashville College of Folk
Music and Woodworking, and both madly in love with a beau-
tiful alto named Ursula Thing, who won their, hearts singing
that fine old folk song, I Strangled My True Love with Her Own
Yellow Braids, and I'll Never Eat Her Sorghum Any More.
Both Manuel and Ed pressed Ursula to go steady, but she
could not choose between them, and finally it was decided that
the boys would have a tree-sitting contest, and Ursula would
belong to the victor. So Manuel and Ed clambered up adjoin-
ing aspens, taking with them the following necessaries: food,
clothing, bedding, reading matter, and-most essential of all-
plenty of Marlboro Cigarettes.
We who live on the ground know how much you get to like
with a Marlboro. Think how much more important they must
be to the lonely tree-dweller-how much more welcome their
fine, mild tobacco; how much more gratifying their free-drawing
filters; how much more comforting their sturdy, crushproof
flip-top box. Climb a tree and see for yourselves.
.v-

FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
10:00 A.M. Meeting for Worship.
10:00 A.M. Sunday School.
11:30 A.M. Meeting for Worship
11:30 A.M. Adult Study Class.
CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1131 Church St.
Dr. E. H. Palmer, Minister
9:30 A.M. U. Bible Class.
10:30 A.M. "The Epistle to the Philippians V.
Happiness in Life or Death."
7:00 P.M. "The Ten Commandments. V. Jesus'
View Towards Authority"
PRESBYTERIAN STUDENT CENTER
at the FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
Rev. William S. Baker, Campus Minister
Miss Patricia Pickett, Assistant
SUNDAY-
Morning Worship 9:00, 10:30, and 12:00-Dr.
Kuizengo.,
10:30 A.M. Seminar on "Christian Beliefs."
11:30 AM. Coffee Hour.
5:45 P.M. Snack Supper.
7:00 P.M. Out-of-doors program.
TUESDAY-1
9:00 A.M. Coffee Hour at Pat Pickett's apart-
ment, 217 South Observatory.
FRIDAY-
6:00 P.M. Graduate supper and program:
"Economics of a Society and Its Religion,"
Speaker, Professor Stolper.
CAMPUS CHAPEL'
(Sponsored by the' Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res, Ph. NO 5-2665; Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 Morning Service.
7:00 Evening Service.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave. r
Herbert R. Lowe, Student Assistant Pastor
Paul R. Eberts, Minister to Students
9:45 A.M. Student Guild Coffee Hour.
10:45 A.M. Worship Service-Sermon, "Dynam-
ics of a Christian Home" by Mr; Lowe.
7:00 P.M. Student Guild.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
and STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor -
Ronald L. Johnstone, Vicar
Sunday at 9:15 and at 10:45: Services, with ser-
mon by the pastor, "The Secret of a Happy
Home."
Sunday at :15 and at 10:45: Bible Study Groups.
Sunday at 4:15: "Parents' Day" Vesper Service.
Sermon, "When Christ Abides in Our Homes."
Sunday from 5:15 to 6:00: Buffet Supper, spon-
sored by Gamma Delta, with parents as special
guests..
Thursday at 7:30 P.M.: )Ascension Day Vesper
Service, with sermon by the vicar, "Ascension
Perspective."
ST. NICHOLAS' ORTHODOX CHURCH
414 N. Main St.
Rev. Fr. Andrew Missiras, Pastor
Saturday Evening-Vespers 8:00 P.M.
Sunday Services-Matins 9:30 A.M.
Divine Liturgy (in Greek) 10:30 A.M. to 12 noon.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and sermon fol-
lowed "by breakfast and discussion in Canter-
bury House.
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
5:30 P.M. Buffet Supper.
6:30 P.M. Musical Evening, Miss Alice Dutcher
and Miss Sara Thurston.
8:00 P.M. Evensong.

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN SCHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister.
9:45 A.M. Church School.
10:45 A.M. Sermon by Russell Fuller: "The Fam-
ily of God."
THE CONGREGATIONAL AND DISCIPLES
STUDENT GUILD
524 Thompson Street
J. Edgar Edwards, Director
Donna Hamilton, Associate
The Student Guild will hear Rev. and Mrs. J.
Edgar Edwards present, "The Adventures
Found in Love and Marriage," at the Disciples
Church at 7:00 P.M.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTISt
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. Sunday Morning Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday, Testimonial Service.
A free reading roam is maintained at 339 South
Main Street. Reading room hours are: Mon-
day 11:00 A.M. to 8:30 P.M. Tuesday - Sat-
urday 11:00 A.M. to 5 P.M. Sunday 2:30 to
4:30 P.M.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATIQN
120 S. State St.
Merril+R. Abbey, L. Burlin Main, William S. -
Hutchison, Eugene A. Ransom, ministers.
9:00 and 11:00 A.M. Worship: "The Fullness of
Joy," Dr. Georgia Harkness.
5:30 P.M. Fellowship Supper.
7:00 P.M. Worship and Program. "The Dis-
covery of God," Dr. Georgia Harkness, Henry
Martin Loud lecturer.
Welcome to Wesley Foundation. Rooms open daily.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. {Stadium at Edgewood
L. C. Utley, Minister
SUNDAYS: 10:00, 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.;
WEDNESOAYS: 7:30 P.M.
Television: Sundays 2:30 P.M., Channel 6,
Lansing.
Radio: Sundays 5:30 P.M WXYZ 1270
For transportation to services Dial NO 3-8273.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister
Mother's Day Services at 9:30 and 11:00 with
Mrs. Evelyn Luchs preaching on "Who Can
Find."
10:20 A.M.. Bible Lecture, Dr. Preston Slosson.
Church School 11:00 A.M., Pre-School Children
supervised during both services.
Student Guild: 7:00 P.M. Disciples Church. Rev.
and Mrs. J. Edgar Edwards present "The Ad-
ventures Found in Love and Marriage."
Alumni Banquet, Saturday (May 17) Congrega-
tional Church, $1.35.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw at Berkshire
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M. Unitarian Adult Group. Prof. Schi-
chiro Matsui on: "Unitarian Roots o the
Japanese Labor Movement."
11:00 A.M. Services for Mother's Day-Sermon
by Rev. Edward H. Redman on: "Changing
Styles of Family Life."
7:00 P.M. Unitarian Student Group.

* V

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,%A

7EE eSYTTZNG' CONTT544w'r.

I_

Special for Married Students
Use The Family Fare Plan-
wives ride one way free.

17
f

TRY OUR NEW
1. HAMBURGER with our own ALL
SPECIAL SAUCE THREE
2. FRENCH FRIESTE
3. JUMBO SHAKE -
Chocolate - Vanilla6
Strawberry
at the
MILK MAID DRIVE.IN
3730 Washtenaw Road

11~
t n
WONDERFUL FUN
FOR EVERYONE
Have a "party" while you
travell Enjoy fine food..:
delightful refreshments...
happy talk. Avoid worry about
traffic congestion, highway
hazards, and weather conditions.
Ask your local ticket or travel
agent NOW about these great
money-saving plans.
EASTERN
RAI LROADS

Well supplied with Marlboros, our heroes began their tree-
sitting contest-Manuel with good heart, Ed with evil cunning.
The shocking fact is that crafty Ed, all unbeknownst to Manuel,
was one of three identical triplets. Each night while Manuel'
dozed on his bough, one of Ed's brothers-Fred or Jed-would
sneak up the tree and replace him. "How can I lose?" said Ed
with a fiendish giggle to his brother Fred or Jed.
But Ed had a big surprise coming. For Manuel,,though
he did not know it himself, was a druid!l He had been abandoned
as an infant at the hut of a poor and humble woodcutter named
Cornelius Whitney Sigafoos III, who had raised the child as
his own. So when Manuel got into the tree, he found much to
his surprise that he had never in all his life felt so at home
and happy. He had absolutely no intention of ever leaving.
After seven or eight years Ed and his brothers wearied of the
contest and conceded. Ursula Thing came to Manuel's tree
and cried, "I am yours! Come down and pin me..
But Manuel declined. Instead he asked Ursula to join him
in the tree. This she could not do, being subject to mopery
(a morbid allergy to woodpeckers), so she ended up with Ed
after all.
Only she made a mistake-a very natural mistake. It was
Jed, not Ed, with whom she ended up.
Ed, heartbroken at being tricked by his own brother, took
up metallurgy to forget.
Crime does not pay.
0 2958 Max Shulmmn
This column is brought to you by the makers of Marlboro
Cigarettes who suggest that if you are ever up a tree when
trying to find a gift, give Marlboros. You can't miss!

7i

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Dr. Chester H. Loucks and the Rev. Hugh
Pickett, Ministers
Mrs. Beth Mahone, Assistant Student
Counselor
9:45 A.M. The Student Bible Class will discuss
"How does one find the Will of God?"
11:00 A.M. Morning Worship - Mr. Pickett's
topic will be "Sacrificing Our Children."
4:00 P.M. Roger Williams Fellowship Planning
meeting.
6:00 P.M. Picnic Supper and further planning.
Monday, May 12-9 to 10 P.M. Coffee hour with
Beth and Charles Mahone, 705 Oakland Ave.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill at S. Forest,
Rev. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
Gerald Kissell, Intern
SUNDAY-
9 .nn & 110AMWosiSevc.

,11

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-Tifte Center
PROUDLY ANNOUNCES
COMOY'S, of LONDON

11

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OWNED AND OPERATE D BY STUDENTS

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SPRING'

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Paul V. Matheson, Assistant
, u Mss:8 :00 :0.11: 00 A M .and

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