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May 08, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-05-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TRE MICHIGAN DAILY THUR

Hospital
dHHT
.eeognzes
tudent Help
en University students re-
ed awards last night for vol-
eer work at University Hos-
. .-
,s students, credited with 50
rs of work, will receive gold
to pin on their badges. Four
lents received awards for
king 100 hours, and will . re-
e -pins.
Wenty-tliree townspeople also
e awarded for volunteering
.r services.
hose honored for more than
hours of work were Ellen
idle, '60; Kathy deKoning,
Carole Goodhue, '60; Kay
ring, '60; Donna Stark, '59 and
e Wasson, '60.
arlene Goldstein, '60, Beata
na, '59, Karen Mandlebaum,
and Charles Proudfit, '59, re-
ed awards for working over
hours.
peakers will be Mrs. Carl Reh-
t, chairman of the Volunteer
rices Advisory Committee, and
. Mereditl Bixby, who has a
ring program on station
IA in Saline.
Ers. Andrea W. Keyes, volun-
services director, will present
rogress report. "The patients
staff appreciate the work of
volunteers," she said yester-
" "The balancing influence of
older people, combined with
fervor of the young people,
s special gratification to the
ents."
harles Proudfit, '59, Claudia
kefield and Mrs. Kenneth
e, as representatives of the
e groups of award winners, ex-
led their thanks to the hospi-
staff for the honors. Proudfit
olunteer assistant to the hos-
I chaplain.
eadership
ward iven
bII first annual Business Lead-
ip. Award of the business ad-
istration school will be pre-
ed to Joseph M. Dodge, chair-
of the Detroit Bank and_.
st Company, at 0 p.m. tomor-
in. Rackham Amphitheater.
he award, consisting of a
al, will be presented annually
"businessman of accomplish-
t. who has shown an under-
ding of the responsibility of
ness to society and an interest
usiness education."
niversity President Harlan
Cher and Dean Russel A. Ste-
on of the business adminis-
ton school will speak at the
entation. Dodge will give an
rd lecture, "The Business of
Lagement'

COURSES ENCOURAGE STUDENTS:
Religious Office Stimulates Interest

Faculty Addresses Forum

By KATHY MOORE
The University encourages stu-
dent concern with the practical
and intellectual aspects of religion
through the services offered by
the Lane Hall Office of Religious
Affairs and the inter-department-
al program for the study of re-
ligion.
Courses offered in 11 depart-
ments of the literary college
broaden the student's understand-
ing of religion without teaching
the doctrine of. any faith.
A Committee on Studies in Re-
ligion, connected with the aca-
demic program, sponsors an an-
nual series of public lectures by
noted scholars in the field of re-
ligion.
Work With Students
The Office of Religious Affairs
has a staff of four, working with
students interested in religious
thought and activity. The staff is
composed of DeWitt C. Baldwin,
Coordinator of Religious Affairs;
C. Grey Austin, Assistant Coordi-
nator of Religious Affairs; Harold
K. Duerksen, Program Director;
and Dolores M. Elden, Program
Assistant.-
Three years ago the University
evaluated and.reorganized its pro-
gram for religious co-ordination,
resulting in a new program with
a new .name, the Office of Re-
ligious Affairs.
The rapid growth of the Univer-
sity and the subsequent decentra-
lization of campus groups made
the organizational change neces-
sary, Austin said.
Butcket Drive
BeginsTo day
A drive will be begun today by
the Engineering Council to collect
$800 in order to erect a plaque in
honor of ex-Dean George Granger
Brown of the enginering school.
The plaque, which will be de-
signed by the architecture college
and constructed in the basement
of the East Engineering Building,
will be erected on North Campus
in special recognition of Dean
Brown's work on the construction
of the North Campus laboratories.
It was Dean Brown's wish to
combine the laboratories of all de-
partments into one basic unit,
thus cutting down on the overall
cost of operation and facilitating
difficult laboratory experimenta-
tion.
The'North Campus laboratories
have been built in accordance
with Dean Brown's plans and
consequently have been named
after him..
In further recognition of his'
achievements in the field of
chemical engineering, the Engi-
nering Council and students in
the engineering school wish to
honor him with the special plaque.
Buckets will be manned today
withing the buildings of engineer-
ing school by members of techni-
cal societies, engineering publica-
tions and the Engineering Council.
Dean Brown, who passed away
last summer, was the recipient of
the Edward DeMill Campbell Uni-
versity of Chemical Engineering
award. He created the recent De-
partment of Science Engineering
and was the author of numerous
textbooks.

Nine faculty members and 37
students from the School of So-t
cial Work will attend the 85th an-
nual .forum of the National Con-
ference on Social Welfare in Chi-
cago next week.1
Prof. Dorothy Schroeder will
deliver the report of the chairman
of the psychiatric social work sec-
tion of the National Association
of Social Workers.
On Monday, Prof. Wilbur J. Co-
hen will deliver a paper on
"Trends in Social Welfare Expen-
ditures and Programs." Prof. Co-
hen is leaving today to attend a
pre-conference meeting of the
National Federation of Settle-
ments and Neighborhood Centers.
Prof. Arthur Dunham and Prof.
Patricia W. Rabinovitz will also
deliver papers at the conference
on Monday.
To Deliver Papers
"The Outlook for Community
Development" is Prof. Dunham's
-topic. Prof. Rabinovitz will speak
on "Establishing a Realistic Re-
lationship Between Services. Un-
dertaken and Staff Complement."
Dean Fedele F. Fauri will pre-
side over a group meeting of the
Committee on Personnel and Ad-
ministration on "The Importance
of Cooperative Planning Between
Public Welfare Agencies and Civil
Service Commissions and Merit
Systems."
Others to Attend
Profs. Henry J. Meyer, Eleanor
G. Cranefield, Ralph C. Fletcher
and Ruth A. Lccher will also be
attending all or part of the Con-
ference forum.
The theme of this year's forum
of the NCSW, founded in 1873, is
"Social Welfare: Accent on Pre-
vention."
An open forum of organizations,
Band To Give
Performance

it makes no decisions or social ac-
tion p r op o s a 1 s, and carries
through no programs, Prof. Dun-
ham said, but serves as a means
by which social workers can share
their experiences and ideas.
t DIAL NO 2-3136
. . . NOW . .
"A HONEY OF
A PICTURE!"
-Daily News

-Daily-Paul Nida
C. GREY AUSTIN-As Assistant Coordinator of Religious Affairs,
Austin's work.involves "helping the religious groups do their
work more effectively." He also aids students and secular groups
interested in religious ideas or activities.

from the producer of "Peyton Place"!
C.- WILLIAM FAULKNER'S
CtL~AOFE9

Although the University at one
time sponsored a student religious
group, the Office of Religious Af-
fairs has no inter-denominational
program. Its purpose is to co-
ordinate the activities of the 22
denominational groups represent-
ed at the University, to act as
consultant to secular groups spon-
soring religious programs, and to
participate in the planning of
events in the inter-departmental
program. for the study of religion.
Basic differences in belief make
a great. deal of inter-denomina-
tional unity both undesirable and
Civic Chorus
To Give Show
The Ann Arbor Civic Women's
Chorus, under the direction of
Jacklin T. Bolton, will present a
spring concert at 8:15 p.m. Mon-
day in the Little Theater of Ann
Arbor High School.
Guest soloist for the program
will be Arthur Benavie, violinist,
who will play the Lalo "Sympho-
nie Espagnole."
Accompanist for Benavie will be
Helen Mendelssohn, a former stu-
dent in the University School of
Music.
Mrs. David Nanney, guest pian-
ist, will play a duet with Mrs.
James Lester, regular accompan-
ist for the chorus. The chorus
will sing a program of music rang-
ing from Brahms to Youmans.

impractical, Austin said. The re-
ligious groups are "aware of their
own uniqueness" and want to pre-
serve it, he said.
At one time the University tried
to force religious cooperation, but
the groups- objected, he continued.
They did not like the idea of hav-
ing to participate in activities in
which they had no interest or
whch were contrary to their be-
liefs. University policy now pro-
vides that each group decide
which functions it wishes to sanc-
tion and no pressure to conform
is ever exerted, Austin said.
Groups Have Own Programs
Each denominational student
group has its own program of re-
ligious and social events and the
churches offer religious counsel-
ing to their student ,population.
However, the groups realize the
need for cooperation in some pro-
gram areas, Austin said. ,
Staff members in the Office of
Religious Affairs act as consult-
tnts for both religious and 'secu-
lar groups wishing to present pro-
grams emphasizing religion. Their
knowledge of the location of peo-
ple and information about speci-
fic areas of religious interest is of
assistance to organizers of such
programs.
Austin said various groups from
the dormitories, fraternities, sor-
orities, and campus clubs regular-
ly take advantage of the resources
at their disposal and the program-
ming aid offered by the Univer-
sity through the Office of Reli-
gious Affairs.

PAUL NEWMAN -JOANNE WOODWARD
ANTHONY FRANCIOSA ORSON WELLES
t EE REMICK- ANGELA LANSBURY oE U
1 +! . t . .A 1 ish" t : M:. '.iiik4 ki

The University Wolverine Band,
under the direction of Mr. George
Cavender, Assistant Conductor of
Bands at the University, will pre-
sent its annual spring concert at
8:00 p.m. tonight in the Michigan
Union Ballroom.
This campus "activities" band
plays for the basketball games
and other campus activities dur-
ing the year. The general public is
invited to attend the concert.
The program will include a cor-
net solo by Eric Coates, featuring
Gregory Munson, '61SM. Other se-
lections include a Toccata by
Frescobaldi, three Chorale Prel-
udes by Latham and selections
from "My Fair Lady" by Lerner-
Loewe.
The "Colonel Bogey March,"
used as background mlusic for the
award-winning movie, "Bridge
Over the River Kwai," will also
be a part of the program.
YOU A

I

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4-
{rte
,

and
ALL OVER THE WORLD. ONE OF THE MOST
ACCLAIMED FILMS QF ALL TIME!

rt To Talk

norrowT

A & P CLEANERS OFFER
BOX FULL OF

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"One of the rare films that permit one
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-Il Momento Sera (Rome)
"One of the most emotional experi
ences of my life. I'll never forget it,"
-Corriere Di Milano (Milan)
-Paris -
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-L'Express
"it is a masterpiece of perfection!"
-Le Parisien
"Superior to 'La Strotda'!"--Le Monde
"A Great Movie!" -L'Aurore
- New York -
"A remarkable film! There are few
actresses in the world as glowing as
Masina. A picture worthy of Direc-
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-Archer Winsten, Post
"Even better than 'La Strada'! Here is
Masina's portrait of Cabiria, which
won her the 'Best Actress' award at
this year's Cannes Festival!"
-Newsweek Magazine

ut.-Governor Philip Hart will,
k at 8 p.m. Friday in the
igan Union.
e Democratic senatorial can-
e for Congress will deal with
opic' "Federal Issues in 1958."

P6 0 "ECTIOfV 0

0

Cinema i/4
TONIGHT and FRIDAY
7:00 and 9:00
Arne Mattsson's
"INCORRIGIBLE"
with Stig Olin, Stig Jarrel,
Harriet Philipsen
Saturday at 7:00 and 9:00
Sunday at 8:00
OSCAR WILDE'S
"THE IMPORTANCE.
of BEING EARNEST"
COLOR

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Your clothes will be dry-cleaned in our usual 'RECNI
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Tickets forRAWl1PlaM
ON SALE TOMORROW 10 A.M.

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