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May 07, 1958 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-05-07

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Sixty-Eighth Year
= EDITED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
"When Opinions Are Free UNDER AUTHORITY OF BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
Truth Will Prevail" STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BLDG. * ANN ARBOR, MICH. * Phone NO 2-3241
Editorials printed in The Michigan Daily ex press the individual opinions of staff writers
or the editors. This mus t be noted in all reprints.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 7, 1958 NIGHT EDITOR: BARTON HUTHWAITE
Tri-Semester System Endangers
Atmosphere of University
THE CALENDAR study committee includes in should be more leisurely, with more time to
its recommendations proposals for more late "waste," than the everyday world. Cutting out
afternoon classes, fuller use of Saturday classes, summer vacation and dead periods between
and most importantly, an eventual three-semes- semester4 would deprive the University of much
ter year. These policies, if put intd effect, would of its unique flavor.
certainly lead to much fuller use of facilities, A week's examination period presents prob-
and permit the University to increase enroll- lems. Would the faculty be forced to schedule
ment, but several other points should be con- three examination a day? It appears likely. The
sidered. corollary, and more important to the students,
Primarily, there is the question of increasing is the possibility of having to take three exami-
Priariy, her isthequetio ofinceasng nations in one day. This could have serious
enrollments itself. The committee appears to effects on s nt dades admtedly, s
favo or t last xpet a ise n te nubereffects on students' grades; admittedly, this is
favor or at least expect a rise in the numb~er not the most important consideration even
of students . .. or perhaps it merely has pro- fom the st iepoint threede aina-
vided for this possibility. In any event, before from the student viewpoint, but three examina-
the University establishes such a "capacity" ions in one day would also tend to reduce the
calendar, it should give serious study through value of the learning and reviewing experience
the rising enrollments committee, to the possi- which should accompany every final examina-
bility of retaining enrollment at essentially the tion. For "borderline" students, the third exam
birrit ofreainin nrollentd esmight mean the difference between staying in
current already crowded level. school and flunking out.
However, the calendar presents other prob-
lems, some of the touched on by Prof. Boulding THE CALENDAR committee's report contains
recently when he spoke of, disturbing the rhy- several valuable recommendations: the first
thm of academic life. One of the chief merits semester ending by Christmas, for instance, or
of University teaching, in the eyes of profes- allowing greater time for grading final exami-
sors, is the long summer vacation which per- nations, These have drawbacks, of course, but
mits faculty members to either augment their they deserve implementation on at least a one-
University salaries or do the tasks impossible to year trial basis. However, the prospect of a
complete during the school year. Summer is and full-year, streamlined calendar, implemented
should be a time for research projects, for by the recommendations of the committee's
catching up on the latest thought in one's report, is disturbing.
specialty, or simply for some quiet contempla- Further consideration of the very real prob-
tion. For the University, where so much re- lem of the University's other functions, in
search takes place, a long summer vacation is addition to teaching, should be undertaken by
an essential. the committee, before the University goes ahead
and plans for anything like a three-semester
THE UNIVERSITY should not be forced to go program.
on a streamlined schedule; by its nature, it -JOHN WEICHER
I-Semester Might Aid Sports

"Is That the Height of our Ambition?"
IS4'oe-,

Second Semester
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
May 30to June10,1958
For courses having both lectures and recitations the "Time
of Class" is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitation only, the "Time of Class" is the time
of the first recitation period. Certain- courses will be examined
at special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there
is no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict, the conflict
is resolved by the class which conflicts with the regular schedule.
Degree candidates having a scheduled examination on June
7, 9 and 10 will be given an examination at an earlier date. The
following schedule designates an evening time for each such
examination. The instructor may arrange with the student for
an alternate time, with notice to the scheduling committee.

I

Evening Schedule for Degree Candidates

Regular
Exam
Time

Sat., June 7 Sat., June 7
Mon., June 9 Mon., June 9
9-12 A.M. 2-5 P.M.

Tues.,
June 10
9-12 A.M.

Tues.,
June 10
2-5 P.M.

1.

Special
Period

Mon., June 2 Tues., June 3 Wed., June 4
7-10 P.M. 7-10 P.M. 7-10 P.M.
Each studen~~~tshudrcientfcto frmhsntutr

Thurs.,
June 5
7-10 P.M.

rV/X
*&9$B -T{6 LdpSNflt,.a6-1 polr .
IN ITALY:
Politicians Prepare or Bout

Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination.
REGULAR SCHEDULE
j Time of Examination

MONDAY

ALTHOUGH ATHLETICS are no criteria .for
basing academic considerations, the effects
of the proposed three semester calendar system
on intercollegiate competition warrants a close
look.
If adopted, it seems likely that the three
semester would each cover approximately four
months-the fall term from September to De-
cember, the second from January to April, and
summer session from June to August. This
would not coincide at all with the current
athletic schedules.
At present the football season runs from Sep-
tember to November, the winter sports from
December to March, and the spring campaigns
from April to May or the first week of June.'
If the present schedules were to be main-
tained, the winter and spring sports would
overlap semesters.
There are two major solutions that can be
considered if the three semester system is insti-
tuted at Michigan. The first of these, involving
little change in schedules, but many problems
Of Symbols. ..
A SWASTIKA appeared on the window of
a local drug store Thursday morning. "It
wasn't very funny," the owner said. He's right;
it wasn't.
The owner of this drug store had a sign on
his cash register congratulating Israel on its.
10th anniversary. According to one of the
store's employees the comments on the sign
were "adverse." This sign most likely brought
about the swastika. But the chance that it
was put there by Nazis seems slim. Rather, it
was put there.by bigots.
The swastika, unfortunately, is a very emo-
tional symbol today, and people get much too
upset when it appears.
There was no doubt what was meant by the
swastikas painted on Hillel at the time of the
Israeli-Anglo-French _ invasion of Egypt, but
this seems to be the exception rather than the
rule. The swastikas which appeared on the
Romance Language building a few weeks ago
probably were put there by slightly tipsy stu-
dents who felt like painting something, the
swastika seemed a good idea.
The best thing to do in the future would be
to ignore them altogether. If these symbols
didn't create such a commotion they would
soon disappear from the sides of buildings into
obscurity.
-THOMAS KABAKER
Editorial Staff
PETER ECKSTEIN, Editor
JAMES ELSMAN, JR VERNON NAHRGANG
Editorial Director City Editor
DONNA HANSON ................ Personnel Director
CAROL PRINS .................... Magazine Editor
EDWARD GEPULDSEN .. Associate Editorial Director
WILLIAM HANEY .................... Features Editor
ROSE PERLFERG .................... Activities Editor
JAMES BAAD...... . ..................Sports Editor
BRUCE BNNETT ............ Associate Sports Editor
JOHN HILLYER .............. Associate Sports Editor
DIANE FRASER ............Assoc. Activities Editor
THOMAS BLUES ...........Assoc. Personne Director
BRUCE BAILEY ................Chief Photographer
Business Staff

in execution, would maintain the present sea-
sonal sports as they are. Coaches of the winter
and spring sports would simply have to endure
the breaks caused by exams, which now tnter-
rupt only winter sports.
THE PRINCIPAL drawback of this type of
plaint is that the athletes lose valuable
practice time, and the team loses smoothness
that the coach has attempted to develop. Bill
Perigo, Michigan basketball mentor, has often
cited the 18-day break in the Conference cage
schedule between January and February as the
reason for the perennial lapse that occurs when
the team returns to Big Ten competition.
However, Michigan would have to accept
this pattern if no other schools were to change
to three semesters. It would be necessary to
stick with the traditional sports seasons to
find opponents. This would mean that, aside
from the final contests of the spring sports,
there would be little athletic activity during
the summer term.
THE OTHER SOLUTION appears to be a very
plan is that the athletes lose valuable
letic setup, but requires the cooperation of
other schools around the country. The three
semester proposition, when viewed realistically,
is a perfect system for the three groups of
season sports that Michigan now engages in.
Football would be played during the fall terni,
the six winter sports (basketball, hockey, gym-
nastics, wrestling, swimming and indoor track)
during the January-April term, and the presen~t
spring sports (baseball, outdoor track, golf and
tennis) during the summer semester.
This schedule fits the sports much better
than the present setup. There would be no
exam break to complicate the headache of
the winter sports.
Secondly, and perhaps of even greater value,
is the fact that the three semester setup would
place the different sports in a much better
season position. Spring sports, as they are called
now, are actually summer sports, Baseball,
golf, tennis and track on most amateur and
professional levels are played primarily during
the summer months-especially in the northern
areas of the country.
IF THIS system is installed, the athlete would
be able to attend school the semester during
which his sport is in season, and perhaps the
previous semester, when preliminary practice
might be held, as it often is on a year around
now. At present, there are no athletes at
Michigan who are on more than two teams, and
they would still be able to compete on both.
From all apparent aspects, the tri-semester
program would be a vastly superior system
when compared to the present one. There
would be a definite subdivision of seasons, and
better weather conditions for the present spring
sports. But this depends on cooperation from
other institutions who must be willing to change
along with Michigan before convenient inter-
collegiate schedules could be established.
On the chance that the change will take
place in the early 1960's, these are propositions
that could well be considered by both the Big
Ten and tle NCAA executive bodies.
-ALAN JONES
New Books at the Library

ROME (P) - Italy's pugnacious
Parliament finally has knocked it-
self out after five years of free-
swinging fisticuffs perhaps unique
in modern lawmaking.
Nationwide elections May 25 will
pick new challengers for the
Chamber of Deputies and Senate.
But candidate lists indicate most
of the old champions will come
back belligerently for further
matches in Italy's legislative
Madison Square Garden.
Unfortunately for history, statis-
ticians have never kept count of
the yards of bandage used in the
parliamentary dispensary this last
five years for black eyes, or bloody
noses.
But it has been a dull month
indeed when shouts of "swine" or
"dog" or "traitor" have not touch-
ed off violence in the legislative
halls.
In this hot tempered Latin land
there's little 6f the English system
of referring to "my honorable op-
ponent."
* * *
FOUR years ago inkwells were
removed from the desks of dep-

ties and senators. They were too
easy to throw. Desks and micro-
phones were bolted down. They
had been torn apart and used as
cudgels.
Critics of the unparliamentary
conduct point out the 300-year-old
Montecitorio, seat of the Chamber
of Deputies, formerly had been an
open courtyard filled only with
quarreling dogs and horsedrawn
carts. The only change, these
critics say, has been that the
horse-drawn carts are no longer
there.
The supposedly sedate Senate is
an equal competitor for'fist fight-
ing honors.
Most of the battlers are bellicose
bantamweights, or balding and
paunchy elders who charge with
fire in their- eyes but not much
punch in their blows. But although
technique is lacking, there is
plently of determination.
Communist Giacomo Caladrone
was suspended from several ses-
sions of the Chamber of Deputies
in 1954 for kicking Christian Dem-
ocrat Claudio Merenda in the face.

EVEN the women legislators get
into the act.
Socialist Giuliana Nenni, daugh-
ter of Stalin Peace Prize winner
Pietro Nenni, slapped Fascist Fi-
lippo Anfuso in the face in a
Chamber brawl in 1955.
In these five years, a dozen sen-
ators and deputies have required
treatment by doctors or in a hos-
pital after the legislative brawls.
Many more than that have been
treated in the parliamentary dis-
pensary.
The black uniformed ushers with
their silver chains of office have
suffered probably even heavier
casualties. It is their job to break
up the fights.
When shouted insults bring leg-
islators charging out of their
chairs, the Chamber or Senate
president first bangs his gavel,
then hings his little silver bell. If
order is not restored, he sets off
sirens that bring the husky ushers
on the run.
They attempt to form holding
lines to keep the fighting factions
apart. They're in the middle and
often are the hardest beset.

at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at;
at
at;

8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3
8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3

Friday, May 30
Monday, June 2
Tuesday, June 3
Saturday, May 31
Friday, June 6
Friday, June 6'
Wednesday, June 4
Friday, June 6
Saturday, May 31
Tuesday, June 3
Friday, May 30
Monday, June 2
Friday, June 6
Thursday, June 5
Thursday, June 5
Wednesday, June 4

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12

A

TUESDAY

SPECIAL PERIODS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS

,

Botany 2, 122
Chemistry 1. 3, 4, 8, i4, 183
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54, 153
Economics 71, 72
"English 23 (A), 24 (A)
**English 23 (B), 24 (B)
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 22, 31, 32
German 1, 2, 11, 31, 32, 35, 36
Naval Science 102, 202, 302,
402
Psychology 271
Russian 1, 2, 32
Sociology 1, 60
Sociology 271
Spanish 1, 2, 22, 31, 32

Thursday, June 5
Friday, June 6
Thursday, June 5
Wednesday, June 4
Saturday, May 31
Wednesday, June 4
Saturday, June 7
Saturday, June 7
Friday, June 6
Wednesday, June 4
Monday, June 9
Tuesday, June 10
Wednesday, June 4
Monday, June 9

9-12
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
7-10 p.m.
9-12
2-5
9-12
9-12
9-12

4

WASHINGTON MERRY-GO-ROUND:

1

WASHINGTON - The
state of Israel, now celebr
her tenth birthday, has ac
plished miracles but faces
problems ahead. These prof
are not hers alone. They ar
problems of the rest of thet
--from three points of view
From a materialistic pot
view, the problem of Arabia
.s vital to the West. Upon i
pends the industry of Fn
England and Western Europ
From the point of view of p
the Near East is the boiling
most likely to erupt in war.]I
erupted twice since V-E D
From the humanitarian
of view, we of the Christianv
-even the Moslem world -
a moral obligation for the m
of 6,000,000 Jews in Germany
minimum obligation is to e
the Jews' peace in the an
land of their forefathers.
Most people have forgotten
it was during Hitler's regime
anti-Jewish hatred was plant
the Arab world. Looking th
the file of my old columns I
that on Aug. 25, 1946 I publi
the secret testimony of W
Schellenberg, chief of Hitler'
Foreign Espionage, in whic
told U.S. examiners how he
been ordered by Himmler in
to pay the Grand Mufti ofJ
salem to stir up anti-J
prejudice. A flat $250,000 was
by Hitler, $150,000 by Muss
Schellenberg further test
"The mission carried along
half hundredweight in goldc
twenty thousand in En
pounds, and ten thousand in
dollars."
The public has also forg

Peace in the Near East
By DREW PEARSON
little eventual transition to gas cham- structive course toward peace
ating bers and soap factories. when he conferred with John Fos-
These are memories which we ter Dulles in Washington last
com- of the Christian world have for- year. Pella recalled what most
grave gotten. Jews can never forget. Americans have forgotten, that
blems They constitute a reason why the under the terms of the Marshall
e the rest of the world, including the Plan, Western European nations
world Moslems (also descended from soon must begin to pay off their
n o the prophet Abraham), have a Marshall Plan loans. Pella pro-
nt of ,deep, unpaid obligation to the posed that this money be rein-
in oil Jewish people. vested, jointly, to reconstruct and
t de- From a monetary viewpoint, stabilize the Near East.j
ance, the Foreign Minister of Italy, Dr. Mediterranean nations could.
pe. Giuseppe Pella, suggested a con- Join the United States in building
peace, irrigation projects and other pub-j
g pot lic works to help both the Arab
t has DYstates and Israel to realize their
ay. interdependence, break down the
point OFFICIAL barriers of prejudice and bring
world peace.
have BULLETIN This is part of the idea Harry
urder Truman was working on when he
.Our left the White House. Foreign
nsure The Daily Official Bulletin is an Minister Pella would also extend
icient official publication of the Univer- co - operative F r e n c h-Italian-
sity of Michigan for which the American reconstruction aid to
Mvichigan Daily assumes no edi- the Arabs of North Africa where
that torial -responsibility. Notices should
that be sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to French-Algeriandbitterness has so
ed in Room 3519 Administration Build- disrupted the world.
ing, before 2 p.m. the day preceding Basically the two ideas are
rough publication. Notices for Sunday identical - the idea of outside
find Daily due at 2:00 p.m. Friday.
nations cooperating with Near
ished WEDNESDAY, MAY 7, 1958 Eastern nations to get them in the
Valter VOL. LXVIII, No. 155 habit of working together. Arab
SNotices bitterness toward Israel is such
h he Gthat this would not be easy. But
1942 Agenda, Student Government Coun- if there is unity and determina-
192 il: tion in the rest of the world - es-
Jeru- Minutes of previous meeting. pecially from Russia - it could be
ewish officer reports: President - letters, accomplished.
paid prospectus,.copihd
Exec. Vice President - Board in Re- "Back in the days of the Greek
olini- view appointment, Evaluation Com- and Roman empires 60,000,000
ified: mittees.~
one- Admin Vice-President - Polish Ex- people lived in this area" Mr
change, Leadership Conference, Ap- Truman once told me. "Now there
coins, pointments. are about 25,000,000 - all because
iglish Treasurer. of war, suspicion, and the des-
U.S. Driving Regulations Administrative truction of the great irrigation
Board.tato ftegetirgto
Standing Committees: works on the Tigris and the Eu-
otten National and International phrates.

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Bus. Ad. 11, 12

Wednesday, June 4

9-12

* Classes beginning on the half hour will be scheduled at the
preceding hour.
** Exam period B is open only to those having a conflict at the
period assigned to Exam A.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

A

A.E. 134, 163
C. E. 20
C.E. 52
C.E. 107
C.E. 141
Draw. 1, 22
Draw. 2, 33
Draw. 12
E.E. 5
E.E. 10
E.M. 1
E.M. 2
English 10, 11
I.E. 100, 140
I.E. 120
M.E. 2
M.E. 114
Naval Science

Saturday, June 7
Tuesday, June 10
Tuesday, June 10
Saturday, June 7
Saturday, June 7
Tuesday, June 10
Saturday, June 7
Saturday, June 7
Friday, June 6
Saturday, June 7
Tuesday, June 10
Monday, June 9
Tuesday, June 10
Friday, June 6
Monday, June 9
Monday, June 9
Tuesday, June 10
Friday, June 6

2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5
9-12
9-12
2-5
9-12
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
7-10 p.m.

102, 202, 302, 402

Special Instructions
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflicts between
assigned examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
See bulletin board outside Room 301 W.E. between April 15 and
30 for instructions.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit of
the University. For time and place of examinations, see bulletin
board in the School of Music.
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN

i

A,

I

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