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April 26, 1958 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-04-26

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A'.

i

Sixty-Eighth Year
EDITED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
UNDER AUTHORITY OF BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BLDG. * ANN ARBOR, MICH.* Phone NO 2-3241

"Don't Get Hysterical - I'm Watching All The Time"
_'- ,Mw.a ''' ym -"".

"When Opinions Are Free
Truth Will Prevail"

Editorials printed in The Michigan Daily express the individual opinions of staff writers
or the editors. This mus t be noted in all reprints.
SATURDAY, APRIL 26, 1958 NIGHT EDITOR: LANE VANDERSLICE
Foundation Trip
Educationally Imaginative
LAST WEEKEND'S Protestant Foundation BUT FOR THE STUDENTS who did go, the
trip to Detroit's Negro community is, as weekend was "extremely interesting," even
participants agree, the sort of trip all inter- "inspiring." They gained insight into a prob-
national students should take. lem-discrimination and the place in society
of minority groups-which is the subject of
And in both total impact and impact per much discussion abroad. They met Americans
dollar it is a marked contrast to many other on common grounds, in which each had some-
activities provided, of which Gov. G. Mennen thing to learn from the other. And learn they
Williams' International Student Day last Feb- did.
ruary is perhaps an extreme example. Contrast- The essential reason the one program inspired
ing the two points out the essense of education. the students, while the other merely gave them
The day in Lansing brought together hun- a good time, is what educators David Riesman
dreds of students from institutions of higher and Philip Jacob have pointed out recently: an
education all across the state. It showed them educational experience must be sharply differ-
the machinery of state government, the ma- ent from what the student is accustomed to.
chinery of an automobile assembly plant and And just as an experimenal college in which
gave them a chance to meet their compatriots freshmen study fifth century Greece varies
who are studying at other Michigan schools. from our College of Literature, Science and the
The program took a lot of time to plan, cost Arts, the weekend in Detroit varied from the
a lot of money and was a lot of fun for all day in Lansing.
concerned. This should not be interpreted as a criticism
of the International Center staff or of Gov.
But what It showed them about the United Williams and his committee which planned the
States and more important the Americans who International Student Day. The automobile
live here is problematical. assembly plant was interesting and the day as
Only 23 students went on the religious groups a whole was fun for all concerned. But more of
visit to Detroit. And the program couldn't have the imagination shown by Amber Van and the
been much larger because, although the two others responsible for the International Week-
Negro churches who acted as hosts have large end in Detroit would give added value to the
congregations, there are only so many people stays in Ann Arbor of many international stu-
willing or able to have a foreign student stay dents.
In their house. And the funds were limited. --THOMAS TURNER
Integration, the House Plan
SEVERAL CAMPUS GROUPS have been agi- rangles, faculty guest programs and many
tating for more complete racial and religious others. And, most of the Board members seem
integration in the Residence Hall system. The anxious to promote integration in the Residence
Board of Governors of Residence Halls has Halls.
been considering the ideas of these groups and (UITE WISELY they are going slowly and
has been making its own study. cautiously in this area. As educators, most
It is generally agreed that total religious of them are interested in offering the students
and racial integration, particularly if it is ac- this valuable experience; as administrators they
companied--as it apparently must be-by the seem interested in the justice of integration.
breaking down of biases, is an ideal to be striven But in pursuit of this ideal of integration they
for. But the Residence Hall system has other must not neglect their other responsibilities.
responsibilities, which people concerned with Experience has shown that there are innum-
integration must realize and accept. erable things-some quite minor-which can
One of the primary objectives of the Michi- cause serious friction between roommates. In
gan House Plan, the basic philosophy of the addition to the rather obvious disadvantages
men's Residence Hall system, is that the resi- of this type of situation, roommate difficulties
dence hall will create an atmosphere conducive frequently have disastrous effects on the indi-
to successful academic achievement. In other vidual's scholastic success.
words this philosophy recognizes that the basic Although integration has apparently worked
responsibility of the University is to provide an out well in a majority of the cases here where
education in the narrow sense of "book-learn- it has been tried, there seem to be a fairly
ing," and that, if the University is providing significant number of cases where it has not
living quarters, they must be conducive to this been successful. Therefore, it is essential that
academic success. the Board of Governors be careful in acting in
However the House Plan also implies that this matter.
the Residence Halls could also be valuable in It would seem that the campus is ready for
a broader educational sphere-social experi- some progress in this area, so the Board of
ence. Since the formulation of the House Plan, Governors can well take this opportunity to
the concept of responsibility for education act in this area. But at the same time they
has been enlarged in scope. The Board of Gov- must make adequate provision that people, of
ernors has been inclined to move rather slowly all races and religions, should not be forced into
in this area, but nevertheless it does recognize a situation for which some people might not be
its responsibilities. It has, slowly, authorized ready. This is not only important for the indi-
various projects designed to give the residents viduals involved, but it is also essential to the
some social-educational experiences such as success of the Residence Hall System.
"open-open houses," co-educational quad- -JAMES SEDER
INTERPRETING THE NEWS:
e State of Titoism

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Second Semester
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
IIORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
May 30 to June 10, 1958
For courses having both lectures and recitations the "Time
of Class" is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitation only, the "Time of Class" is the time
of the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined
at special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there
is no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict, the conflict
is resolved by the class which conflicts with the regular schedule.
Degree candidates having a scheduled examination on June
7, 9 and 10 will be given an examination at an earlier date. The
following schedule designates an evening time for each such
examination. The instructor may arrange with the student for
an alternate time, with notice to the scheduling committee.
Evening Schedule for Degree Candidates
Regular Sat., June 7 Sat., June 7 Tues. Tues.,
Exam Mon., June 9 Mon., Iune 9 June 10 June 10
Time 9-12 A.M. 2-5 P.M. 9-12 A.M. 2-5 P.M.
Special Mon., June 2 Tues., June 3 wed., June 4 Thurs.,
Period 7-10 P.M. 7-10 P.M. 7-10 P.M. June 5
7-10 P.M.
Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination.
REGULAR SCHEDULE
jI.Time of Examination

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WASHINGTON MERRY-GO-ROUND:
Services Feud About Feuds
By JACK ANDERSON

(EDITOR'S NOTE: With Drew Pear-
son in the middle west, his column
today is written by his associate, Jack
Anderson.)
WASHINGTON - The Presi-
dent's military reorganization
plan, which is supposed to stop in-
terservice feuding, has started
some dandy new feuds.
Feud No. 1 - The armed serv-
ices are feuding behind the scenes
over the best way to halt their
feuding. The Air Force favors the
President's plan, the Navy is
against it and the Army is split.
Through its civilian arms-the
Navy League and Naval Advisory
Council - the Navy is waging an
undercover campaign against Ike's
proposals. Retired Adm. J. W.
Reeves, Jr., advisory council chair-
man, has called on his members
to bring pressure on congressmen
to defeat the President's reorgan-
ization plan.
REEVES'S confidential letter
warns: "Do not - repeat do not--
speak as a member of the Advisory
Council or Navy League, but as an
individual citizen. This personal
contact is most important at this
time either by telephone, wire or
person-to-person approach."
Feud No. 2 -Georgia's crusty,
crafty congressman Carl Vinson,
who has opened hostile hearings
on the reorganization bill, is feud-
ing with the White House over
who should write the final ver-
sion.
"I appreciate the President's in-
terest," Vinson told White House
aides bluntly, "but Congress is go-
ing to write the reorganization
bill."
The caustic Georgian prepared
a speech last week blasting Ike for
talking about reorganization but
sending Congress no formal rec-
ommendations. The White House
got advance wind of the speech
and, in order to thwart Vinson,
rushed Ike's proposed bill to the

press a couple hours before Vin-
son took the floor.
It remains to be seen whether
the reorganization battle will be a
feud to end all feuds.
Whatever the outcome, how-
ever, it promises to be the great-
est military debate since the Air
Force was split off from the Army
in 1947 and the three sister serv-
ices were sent to live together in
the pentagon in what was sup-
posed to be one big happy family.
Instead, they put on a display
of eye-scratching, back-biting,
and hair-pulling that drove the
first secretary of defense, the late
James Forrestal, literally out of
his mind. Interservice rivalry has
gone so far that the services now
keep secrets, including vital mis-
sile information, from each other.
Thousands of classified papers
are stamped for Army, Navy or
Air Force eyes only.
s * s
AT THE SAME TIME, the de-
fense machinery has become
hopelessly clogged with red tape.
Gen. Maxwell Taylor, the Army
chief, has complaned that 19 ci-
vilian officials stand between him
and the commander-in-chief. All
19 have a say in how the Army
should be run.
Former Secretary of Defense
Charlie Wilson surrounded him-
self with 29 deputy or assistant
secretaries, similar to General
Motors vice-presidents, who had
authority to say "no" but seldom
"yes." In other words, they had a
negative authority which does not
permit them to make high policy
decisions but only to block them.
They are still functioning.
Wilson built up a gigantic, un-
wieldy staff of over 2,400 em-
ployees, divided into empires with-
in empires. These empires are
headed by deputies and assistants
who keep adding more employees
on the theory that the more In-

dians they command the bigger
chief they become.
The result, however, is to im-
pede and obstruct decision-mak-
ing. A new idea must pass through
stifling layers of bureaucracy. By
the time it has run the gauntlet
of assistants, it is weighted down
with so many comments that the
Secretary of Defense has difficul-
ty wading through the accumulat-
ed memos.
Eisenhower and Vinson have
different ideas about how to cor-
rect the abuses. Ike wants to
downgrade the three services and
give the Secretary of Defense
more power. His plan, however,
abolishes the right of military
subordinates to bring their dif-
ferences over defense policies to
Congress. This is a right for which
Congress will battle to the end.
* * *
THE PRESIDENT seriously
considered strippings the three
services of their departmental
standing and making their civil-
ian chiefs Undersecretaries of De-
fense for Army, Navy, and Air.
Secretary of Defense McElroy per-
suaded the President,ihowever,
this would be too drastic.
On the other hand, Vinson
wants to bolster the independence
of the three services by bringing
the secretaries of the Army, Navy,
and Air Force into the powerful,
policy-making National Security
Council.
His plan would also streamline
the Pentagon more drastically
than the President's recommen-
dations by slashing the Secre-
tary's staff from 2,400 to 600 em-
ployees And eliminating 14 Deputy
and Assistant Secretaries. It
would also curb the power of the
Defense Comptroller, whose fiscal
policies have often determined de-
fense decisions.
Meanwhile, the battle lines are
drawn and Washington is settling
down to a good fight.
(Copyright 1958 by Bell syndicate, Inc.)

MONDAY
TUESDAY

at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at

8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3
8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3

Friday, May 30
Monday, June 2
Tuesday, June 3
Saturday, May 31
Friday, June 6
Friday, June 6
Wednesday, June 4
Friday, June 6
Saturday, May 31
Tuesday, June 3
Friday, May 30
Monday, June 2
Friday, June 6
Thursday, June 5
Thursday, June 5
Wednesday, June 4

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12

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41

..

SPECIAL PERIODS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS

Botany 2, 122
Chemistry 1, 3, 4, 8, 14, 183
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54, 153
Economics 71, 72
**English 23 (A), 24 (A)
**English 23 (B), 24 (B)
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 22, 31, 32
German 1, 2, 11, 31, 32, 35, 36
Naval Science 102, 202, 302,
402
Psychology 271
Russian 1, 2, 32
Sociology 1, 60
Sociology 271
Spanish 1, 2, 22, 31, 32

Thursday, June 5
Friday, June 6
Thursday, June 5
Wednesday, June 4
Saturday, May 31
Wednesday, June 4
Saturday, June 7
Saturday, June 7
Friday, June 6
Wednesday, June 4
Monday, June 9
Tuesday, June 10
Wednesday, June 4
Monday, June 9

9-12
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
7-10 p.m.
9-12
2-5
9-12
9-12
9-12

I

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Bus. Ad. 11, 12

Wednesday, June 4

9-12

* Classes beginning on the half hour will be scheduled at the
preceding hour.
* Exam period B is open only to those having a conflict at the
period assigned to Exam A.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

41

By J. M. ROBERTS
Associated Press Foreign News Analyst
THE MORE THE YUGOSLAV and Russian
Communists talk about overcoming their
differences the farther apart they seem to get.
Relations got a little better after the death
of Stalin, but have been strained again since
the Hungarian revolt in 1956, when the Red
army was revealed as the suppressor rather
than the supporter of the workers. There was
also a diplomatic incident in which the Soviet
Union ignored Yugoslavia by arresting through
subterfuge a Hungarian leader who had placed
himself under Yugoslav diplomatic protection.
Since then the pendulum has swung back
and forth, with considerable effort on the
Kremlin's part to smooth the waters.
But the Yugoslav's Tito has remained the
outstanding proponent, among Communists,
Editorial Staff
PETER ECKSTEIN, Editor
JAMES ELSMAN, JR, VERNON NAHRGANG
Editorial Director City Editor
DONNA HANSON".........,. Personnel Director
CAROL PRINS.....................Magazine Editor
EDWARD GERULDSEN .. Associate Editorial Director
WILLIAM HANEY.....................Features Editor
ROSE PERLBERG.....................Activities Editor
JAMES 13AAD .. ............. Sports Editor
BRUCE BENNETT............ Associate Sports Editor
JOHN HILLYER ................Associate Sports Editor
DIANE FRASER ............-----Asoc. Activities Editor

of national independence within the world
Communist movement.
NOW HIS PARTY platform has taken Yugo-
slaviadeeper into both neutralism and de-
viation.
It holds tht Soviet Union responsible with
the West for the arms race.
It doesn't espouse what history makes clear,
that Western rearmament after World War
II was purely a reaction to Soviet military
threats and expansionist policy, but it goes a
long way for Communists.
That is neutralism and deviation with a
vengeance. Leninism holds that wars made in
behalf of communism are goods wars, and all
other bad wars. That makes it proper for the
Soviet Union but bad for the democracies to
arm. Now Titoism says its bad for everybody.
Titoism also says now that socialization has
been taking place in the midst of capitalism,
which is true, and that evolution may obviate
the need for revolution.
ACCEPTANCE OF THAT theory among all
Communists would rob the Soviet Union of
communism as a weapon for expansion, which
is primarily a traditional Soviet policy rather
than something produced by communism itself.
At the opening of the Yugoslav party con-
gress this week Tito, although firmly warning
Moscow to stop meddling in Yugoslav affairs,
spent a lot of time praising Soviet efforts since
the death of Stalin to ease international ten-
sions.

THE BRASS SOUNDS OFF:
Inter-Service Insecurity

A.E. 134, 163
C. E. 20
C.E. 52
C.E. 107
C.E. 141
Draw. 1, 22
Draw. 2, 33
Draw. 12
E.E. 5
E.E. 10
E.M. 1
E.M. 2
English 10, 11
I.E. 100, 140
I.E. 120
M.E. 2
M.E. 114
Naval Science 102, 202, 302, 402

Saturday, June 7
Tuesday, June 10
Tuesday, June 10
Saturday, June 7
Saturday, June 7
Tuesday, June 10
Saturday, June 7
Saturday, June 7
Friday, June 6
Saturday, June 7
Tuesday, June 10
Monday, June 9
Tuesday, June 10
Friday, June 6
Monday, June 9
Monday, June 9
Tuesday, June 10
Friday, June 6

2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5
9-12
9-12
2-5
9-12
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
7-10 p.m

By The Associated Press
D IFFERENCES among the three
military services over the best
approach to national security
have seldom been more clearly fo-
cused than by the three top offi-
cers who addressed the American
Newspaper Publishers Assn.
Thursday.
Gen. Curtis LeMay, Air Force
vice-chief of staff, called mutual
deterrence a myth and said the
danger of general war is increas-
ing along with the rise in Russia's
striking potential.
He thinks the Air Force would
have to do 90 per cent of the re-
taliatory work.
* * *
GEN. MAXWELL Taylor, Army
chief of staff, said that under mu-
tual atomic deterrence the danger

three services will be able to pro-
vide the nation with the broad
capabilities it needs.
There is here, however, a dif-
ference of political evaluations as
well as military concepts.
Under the American system,
Congress and the Executive de-
Intelligence?
ROBERT AMORY, the CIA Dep-
uty Director who told a Har-
vard "kaffeeklatsch" in December,
1955, that the government's "chief
problem" was conditioning the
American people to accept Red
China's admission to the UN, was
in rare form at a recent meeting
of the New York Council on For-
eign Relation.

partments are supposed to lay
down military objectives, and the
military departments are sup-
posed to lay plans, within the lim-
its of congressional appropria-
tions, for attaining them.
Coordination is supposed to be
provided through civilian heads of
the military departments, a part
of the general executive system.
When there are differences in
concept among all three groups
as to the conditions which most
urgently need to be met, the uni-
formed groups are left to compete
for appropriations.
Under its former General Staff
system, Germany made great use
of such war resources as it had
but became anathema to the de-
mocracies.
THE DEMOCRACIES have

,r

Special Instructions
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflicts between
assigned examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
See bulletin board outside Room 301 W.E. between April 15 and
30 for instructions.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit of
the University. For time and place of examinations, see bulletin

4A

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