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April 24, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-04-24

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THNE MCHIGAN Dom,! THURSDAY

tical Scientists Meet
Midwest Conference

TO MEET INFORMALLY:
Political Issues Group.
Revises Programming

University will play host to
250 political scientists at-
g the 16th annual Midwest
rence of Political Scientists,
. from today through Satur-
i the ERackham Bldg.
conference gets under way
.m. today, with a welcom-
eech by Prof. James K. Pol-
chairman of the political
e department. A discussion'
ie Presidential Leadership of
ore Roosevelt,' will then be'
red by Prof. John M. Blum
e University.
Midwest Factionalism
ning and afternoon sessions
row will consist of two series
concurrent roundtable dis-
ns. The morning program
insist of:
"Rural-Urban Factionalism
e Midwestern States," part
"Recent .Internal Political_
Economic Developments in
Policy," to be chaired by

'chants
nimistic

mall retailers from througbout
state expressed optimism in
r outlook fdr the second half
1958 at the University's 12th
ual Merchandising Confer-.
Tree-fourths of the partici-
ts said they expected their
e's sales and profits during
last half of the year to be as
d or better than the same
od of 1957. One-fourth expect
r Sales to be lower.
Short-term Decline
1 contrast to their present ex-;
ations,, the retailers stated
r expected their store sales and
fits to decline for the first half-
[958.
Iniversity A s s o c i a t e Prof.
mas Gies -of the business ad-
istration school told 75 con.-
nce participants that consu-
spending has remained "im-
sively strong" during the past'
t moriths of declining indus-
1 production.
rof. Gies said-that the factors
ch contribute to the strength
he second half outlook are: 1)
ntories will largely if not en.
y have been readjusted by the"
nd half 2) national spending
shown no major change from
"virtually unbroken upward
d" in the past 12 years 3) fed.
.spending will increase wheth-
or not a major new public
ks program is enacted, and 4)
y indications suggest that the
I of new housing starts may
only match the 1957 level, but.
r exceed it by 10 per emnt.
Stepped Up Spending,
epped up local, state and fed-
government spending "is like-
) more than,offset further de-
es in busines spending. for new
it and equipment," Prof. Gies
rof. Gies concluded, "Retail-
and wholesalers,' generally
king, indicate a currently sat-
ctory balance between inven-
es and sales. By mid-year, the
ufacturing sector,. . respon-
for the bulk of recent inven-
liquidation . .. should have
eyed a rebalanced position."

Prof. William B. Ballis of the poli-
tical science department;
3) "Game Theory and Its Fala-
tion to Political Theory," with Ann
Arbor's Mayor, Prof. Samuel J.
Eldersveld of the political science
department acting as chairman,
U.S. Foreign Policy
4) "Problems of United States
Foreign Policy," 'With a talk on
"The Strategic Problems of
NATO" by Prof. Robert Osgood of
the University of Chicago, and
participation by Gen. S.L.A. Mar-
shall, military writer for a Detroit
newspaper'
S) "Reassessing the Council-
Maiager Form of Government;"
and
6) "the Supreme Court as Poli-
Poicy Maker."
A luncheon at the League will'
be addressed by Prof. V. O. Key
of Harvard University, speaking
on "Emerging Problems of the
Profession."
Second Series Opens
The second series of round-
tables, which will begin at 8 p.m.
tomorrow, will consist of:
1) Rural-Urban Factionalism in
the Midwestern States," part two
covering an additional "ix Mid-
western states;
2) "The Problem of Legislative-
Xxecutive Relationships in the
Formulation and Control of For-
eign Policy in. Post World War II,"
including a discussion of the "For-
mulation of Foreign Policy in the
Western Democracies" by Prof.
Roy Macridis of St. Louis Univer-
sity;
3) "The Nature of Community
in a Democratic Society;"
Cottrell, Levi to Speak
4) "Problems of United States
Foreign Policy," part two, with
talks by Prof. Fred Cottrell of
Miami University and Prof. Wer-
ner Levi of the University of Min-
nesota;
5) "The States and Metropoli-
tan Areas;" and
6) "Curbing the S u p re me
Court' with Prof. C. Herman
Pritchett of the University of Chi-
sago acting as chairman, and
Prof. Daniel S. McHargue of the
University of Michigan's political
science department as one of the
discussants.
A General Assembly at 9:45 a.m.
Saturday in Aud. A, Angell Hall
will wind up the conference. "The
Political Situation in Great Bri-
tan" will be discussed by G.D.H.
Cole of Nuffield College, Oxford
University.
U Economist
To Go Abroad
Prof. Richard A. Musgrave of
the economics department . will
serve for three months this sum-
mer as an advisor on tax and bud-
get policy to the Burmese govern-
ment.
A poor rice crop in recent
months has given Burma a tight
foreign exchange situation, Prof.
Musgrave notes. One of his main
concerns in trying to improve the
situation will be how investment
and other means of capital forma-
tion can be encouraged by the
government.
He will leave here June 1 and
expects to return to the Univer-
sity in September.

-Daily-Paul Nida
PROF. FRED HABERMAN '
...speaks on orators
Haberman
Give Talk
On Orators'
Prof. Fred W. Haberman, chair-
T an of the speech department at
e University of Wisconsin, yes'-
terday spoke at the Speech Assem-
bly on.four orators who each add-
ed "a new dimension to the con-
cept of liberty."
Demosthenes,. fourth century
Athenian orator, contributed the
concept of "liberty of the tribe."
The second of Haberman's four
"spokesmen for freedom" was Pe-
ter Wentworth, the "first man to
give a reasoned discourse on free-
dom of speech in the House of
Commons." Although Wentworth's
reasons were- considerably more
mystical than a modern discourse
likely would be, Prof. Haberman
said Wentworth's plea for free-
dom of ;"the individual conscience"
is valid.,
A woman of English birth, Anna
Howard Shaw, who was "an or-
dained minister, medical doctor
and suffragette," was the third of
these spokesmen. She pleaded for
"liberty for personal opportunity."
Franklin Delano R o o s e v e l t
preached the doctrine of "liberty
of the community." "Every new
doctrine of the last 35 years came
under this heading," Prof. Haber-
man said. This is a doctrine de-
signed to protect society at large
from abuse by a special group.

By RICHARD CONDON
Over the past year the Political
Issues Club, which recently with-
drew a petition to sponsor singer
Paul Robeson here, has been un-
dergoing a readjustment of its or-
ganizational meetings and corre-
lating activities, according to
chairman Ned McClennan, '59.
Originally the Political Issues
Club was established in order to
bring interesting and controver-
sial personalities to campus with
hopes of stimulating student in-
terest in the political and non-
campus activities. The program
was set up at a time when there
were not as many thought-pro-
voking lectures taking place as
there are now.
There is no longer an urgent
need for the acquisition of more
interesting speakers' at, the Uni-
versity, McClennan said, so the
club- is reorganizing 'its program
erence to politics and short-wave
bers are now gathering in private
apartments on a weekly non-
scheduled basis with the purpose
of discussing various contempor-
ary problems. These discussions
are open to non-club members as
well as the menTbers themselves.
Tonight, tape recordings of mu-
sic used for propaganda will be
played, followed by expository
opinions expressed by the listen-
ers.
Olson To oTal
In Columbus
Dean Willard C. Olson of the
education school will speak today
at the Institute of Child Develop-
ment and Famliy Life in Colum-
bus, Ohio.
His lecture is entitled "The
Children Who Surprised Us."
What! Me Worry!
I'm playing
"SNAP THE TRAP"
with D Phi E and
Phi Sig Delt
at Michigras .. .

During the past semester the
Club has heard a recording on the
tactics and success of Red Chi-
nese "brainwashing," a discussion
on the present connotation of the
word "liberal" as it is used in ref-
erence to politics and short-waxe
broadcasts of "Radio Moscow"
propaganda.
Out-Look
Republican conservatism and
the "natural" look in men's
clothes may make a fast exit if
the Democrats are elected in
1960.
According to Ron Postal, not-
ed stylist who originated the
s q u a r e d-oaf f breast pocket
handkerchief and suits with
no breast pockets, the "ivy
league" look is a manifestation
of Republican conservatism..
"If the country goes Demo-
cratic in 1960, it will be a re-
bellion against Republican con-
servatism. A change in Admin-
istration could bring a new age
of flamboyancy in men's attire,
maybe with a big swing ala
Jimmy Walker," he said.
Noted male stylists notice a
decline in strict "ivy" styles, es-
pecially in suit Jackets. Design-
ers are already putting in small
pads, Postal pointed out.

Archaeologist
To Lecture,
Sho Slides
wIgnacio Bernal, director of the
Prehispanic Monuments at the
Mexican National Institute of An-
thropology and History, will speak
on "Recent Excavations at Oaxa-
ca" at 4:15 p.m. today.
The lecture, under the auspices
of the anthropology department,
will be given in the Natural Sci-
ence Auditorium.
Bernal will discuss and show
slides of the mound excavations,
burials and buildings at Oaxaca,
a state in south central Mexico,
according to Prof. James B. Grif-
fin of the anthropology depart-
ment. The archaeological sites
date from 1000 B.C. to the Span-
.ish conquest of the primitive In-
dians.
Union Plans
Hi-F1i Concert
The Union Social Committee
will present a hi-fi concert at 7:30
p.m. today in the Hi-Fi Lounge of
the Michigan Union.
The concert is the second in a
series initiated to encourage' use
of the Union's newly-installed
high fidelity system.
Selections to be played are
"Gaite Parisienne" by Offenbach,
"Rhapsody in Blue" by Gershwin,
and "South Pacific" by Rodgers
and Hammerstein.

NOW

A
DIAL NO 2-3 136

DIAL
NO 2-3136

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"'PERFECT!
Just what the
doctor ordered !"

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--Crowther, Times

DANNY KAYEN .. .
"MERRY fANDRE W srrin g"~
PIER ANGELI-BACCALONI -NOEL PURCELL -ROBERT COTE
and with PATRICIA CUTTS
CINEMASCOPE & METROCOLOR
Cinemascope & Color
"JOURNEY THRU
CEYLON" 4I f Ms
CEYLON bE'eryjhg Is Ticty4
Travel Subject! "sw sheyru
. 6 .. dgbwat

(Now)

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MATINEES 65c
EVES. & SUN. 90c
Doors open at
12:45

DIAL NO 2-2513

- a.a a a a a . ~. A

Ch)

TO

WALTE
"THE

NIGHT and FRIDAY
7:00 and 9:00
R VAN TILDEN CLARK'S
XBOW INCIDENT"
with
FONDA, DANA ANDREWS
HENRY MORGAN
day at 7:00 and 9:00
Sunday at 8:00
NOEL COWARD'S
IEF ENCOUNTER"
with

Shows at 1:00 - 3:00 - 5:00 - 7:00 - 9:00 P.M.
the love story
of Julie and ill...
the woman who loved an atomic
scientist...and the unwanted child
who came into their livesi

the shirtwaist chemise
...dress-length version of
your favorite classic
shirt, with roll-up sleeves,
a look of ease, and a
wide self belt for variety.
drip-dry cotton broadcloth

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