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April 19, 1958 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-04-19

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THE 1fCIGAN fDAILY

SATURDAY, AP~T 19, 190

iversity Accepts $111,504 in Aid
Iegents accepted a -
14.44 in gifts, grants was added to the John Jacobson Two grants totalling $2,500 were cepted from the General Motors
I their meeting yes- fund for chemistry. made by the Kaiser Aluminum Corporation of Detroit.
International Nickel Company, and Chemical Corporation of To continue pharmacology re-
he support of the Inc., gave $8,220.83 to continue its Calif., for the business adminis- search under the direction of Dr.
esearch activities of fellowship, and the McKesson and tration school. M. H. Seevers, the Parke, Davis
Dekker of the Medi- Robbins Company of New York A grant of $2,350 was made by Company of Detroit granted $2,-
dological chemistry City donated $5,076.86 for re- the Winthrop Laboratories of New 000. The Goodyear Foundation of
ie American Cyan- searph in pharmacy. York, N.Y., for medical research. Akron, O., gave $1,125 to estab-
of New York,N.Y. Summer School Aid A fellowship of $2,300 for instru- lish a Goodyear Foundation
n+ 4.... th.. 0 4 ~- ._ -,*sI --- mentation engineering was ac- Scholarship Fund.

RedMNeks
The "necking party" adver-
tised by University of Omaha
students was just that, but
school officials really had no
need to become upset.
Plans for the party called for
prizes to 'the longest neck,
shortest neck and the best
Adam's apple, following which
they were to play chess or
checkers.

PHOENIX PROJECT:
Name 14 to
University Regents approved the
appointment of a 14-member
Board of-Governors of the Phoenix
Research Project at their meeting
yesterday.
1 Dean Ralph A. Sawyer of the
flackham Graduate School, direc-
tor of the project, was appointed
as an ex-officio member. The 13
other members, seven of whom are
non-University members, were ap-
pointed for terms of varying
length.
Appointed for terms ending in
June of 1959 are Prof. Robert C.
Angell of the sociology department
and Prof. Samuel D. Estep of the
Law School, members of the Fac-
ulty Executive Committee of the
project.
Also selected for this term are
Lawrence R. Halfstad, vice-presi-
dent for research, General Motors
Corporation, and Harvey M. Mer-

Board of Governors

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ker, former vice-president of
Parke, Davis & Company.
Appointed for terms ending in
June, 1960 were Henry J. Gqmberg,
assistant director of the Phoenix
Project, and Lyle M. Nelson, direc-
tor of University relations.
Dod Ge Given
New Award
Joseph M. Dodge, chairman of
the Detroit Bank and Trust Com-
pany, received the first annual
business leadership award of the
University School of Business Ad-
ministration last night. I
The award was presented to
Dodge following his lecture on
"The Business of Management"
which was delivered at 8 p.m.

Other appointments made for
this term were Andrew A. Kucher,
vice-president for engineering and
research, Ford Motor Company;
Harvey A. Wagner, assistant man-
ager of engineering, Detroit Edison
Company, and James C. Zeder,
vice-president of Chrysler Corpor-
ation.
There were four appointments to
terms ending in June, 1961. Steph-
en S. Attwood, acting dean of the
engineering college, and Dr. Fred
J. Hodges, chairman of the Medi-
cal School's department of radi-
ology were members selected from
the University.
Further appointments for this
term are Clark S. Center, vice-
president of Union Carbide and
Carbon Nuclear Company, which
handles the Oak Ridge operations,
and James F. Fairman, vice-presi-
dent of Consolidated Edison.

4

Mu len Sees Picasso as 'Freudian'

the archite cture college said
Thursday in a lecture in East
Quadrangle sponsored by the East
Quad Council.
Enlarging upon this point, Prof.
Mullen reminded his audience
that everyonie has a fantasy life:
in his dreams and in his day-
dreams. Picasso, he said, uses
these fantasies in some, of his
worl.
Judges Art
"Painting should not be judged
on an 'I like it - I don't like it'
basis;" he continued. "It is a
means of communication between
the artist and the viewer. One
cannot look at art purely objec-
tively; one must become emotion-
ally involved.
"One has to be more than pas-
sive when looking at art since it
is not only seeing, but knowing."
Prof. Mullen explained that "we
all react emotionally to color and
we are all marvelously intrigued
by the strange." Picasso, he said,
experimented with various color
and form techniques.
"In fact," Prof. Mullen added,
"research might be the key word.
in describing Picasso."
Had Changing Style
Since Picasso has been so inter-
ested in research and since "he
has been very quick to change his

style," Prof. Mullen does not agree
with those critics and artists who
attempt to mark out "periods" in
Picasso's painting. According to
Prof. Mullen, Picasso is very much
alive to the world about him, and
this partly explains the "periods"
in Picasso's work.
Prof. Mullen said that he felt
Picasso is the most important
single influence in art today. "All
artists under fifty have been in-
fluenced by Picasso," he added.
Civil Defense,
Center Passed
Regents of the University ap-
proved contracts for the construc-
tion of a Civil Defense and Disas-
ter Training Center building and
for the remodeling of a house for
women students yesterday.
The general contract for the
Civil Defense and Disaster Train-
ing center was awarded to Perron
Construction Co., Detroit, with a
bid of $288,269.
The remodeling of Mary Barton
Henderson Memorial Hall was
awarded to Niethammer & Mc-
Dowell, Ann Arbor, with a bid of
$22,921. A total budget of $32,000
was established for the project.

r

Come

to Church

Sunday,,

(By the Author of "Rally Round the Flag, Boys! "and,
"Barefoot Boy with Cheek.")I

i

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SCIENCE MADE SIMPLE: No. 3
Once again the makers of Marlboro Cigarettes, bless their tat-
tooed hearts, have consented to let me use this space, normally
intended for levity, to bring you a brief lesson in science.
They are generous, openhanded men, the makers of Marlboro,
hearty, ruddy, and full of the joy of living, as anyone can tell
who has sampled their wares. In Marlboro you will find no
stinting, no stinginess. Marlboro's pleasures are rich, manifold,
and bountiful. You get a lot to like with a Marlboro-filter,
flavor, flip-top box, and, in some models, power steering.
The science that we take up today is called astronomy, froin
the Greek words astro meaning "sore" and nomy meaning
"back". Sore backs were the occupational disease of the early
Greek astronomers, and no wonder! They used to spend every
blessed night lying on the damp ground and looking up at the
sky, and if there's a better way to get a sore back, I'd like to
hear about it. Especially in the moist Mediterranean area,
where Greece is generally considered to be.
Lumbago and related disorders kept astronomy from be-
coming very popular until Galileo, an unemployed muleteer of
Pamplona, fashioned a homemade telescope in 1924 out of
three Social Security cards and an ordinary ice cube. What
schoolboy does not know tljat stirring story-how Galileo
stepped up to his telescope, how he looked heavenward, how
his face filled with wonder, how he stepped back and whispered
the words heard round the world: "Let them eat cake!"

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
and STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Ronald L. Johnstone, Vicar
Sunday, April 2, Worship services at 9:15 and
10:45. Sermon topic: "Take Faith As Your
Shield."
Bible study groups at 9:15 and 10:45.
Sunday School at 9:15.
Gamma Delta (Lutheran student club) at 6. Cost
supper followed by business meeting and elec-
tion of officers for next year.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Paul V. Matheson, Assistant
Sunday Masses: -8:00 9:30, 11:00 A.M. and
12:00 noon.
Weekday Masses: 6:30, 7:00, 8:00 and 9:00
A.M.
Novena Devotions: Wednesday evening, 7:30 P.M.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 P.M.
Classes each evening in Christian Doctrine, Apolo-
getics, Church History, Scholastic Philosophy,
in the Father Richard Center.
CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1131 Church St.
Dr. E. H. Palmer, Minister
9:30 U. Bible Closs.
10:30 "The Epistle to The Philippians."
11I "The Thanksgiving."
7:00 P.M. "The-Ten Commandments."
11 "How to Worship."
ST. NICHOLAS' ORTHODOX CHURCH
414 N. Main St.
Rev. Fr. Andrew Missiras, Pastor
Saturday Evening-Vespers 8:00 P.M.
Sunday Services-Matins 9:30 A.M.
Divine Liturgy (in Greek) 10:30 A.M. to 12 noon.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood'
L. -C. Utley, Minister
SUNDAYS: 10:00, 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.;
WEDNESDAYS: 7:30 P.M.
Television: Sundays 2:30 P.M., Channel 6
Lansing.
Radio: Sundays 5:30 P.M. WXYZ 1270
For transportation to services Dial NO 3-8273.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw at Berkshire
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10 A.M. Unitarian Adult Group. "The Role of
Michigan High Schools in Today's Society." Dr.
Ray E. Kehoe.
11 A.M. Service of Worship. Rev. Edward H. Red-
man preaching op: "We Drew a Circle That
Took Him In."
7:30 P.M. Unitarian Student Group.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill at S. Forest
Rev. H. O. Yoder, Pastor
Gerald Kissell, Intern
Sunday-
9:00 & 11:00 A.M. Worship Services.
10:00 A.M. Bible Study.
6:00 P.M. Supper.
7:00 P.M. Speaker: Dr. John Baldwin, His-
tory Dept.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister.
9:45 A.M. Church School.
10:45 A.M. Sermon, "Faith of Our Fathers."
THE CONGREGATIONAL AND DISCIPLES
STUDENT GUILD
524 Thompson Street
J. Edgar Edwards, Director
Donna Hamilton, Associate
THE STUDENT GUILD will meet at 7:00 P.M. In
the Disciples Church parlor to hear Mr. How-
ard Harris of the Ann Arbor Quakers speak on
"Atomic Arms for What End?"
Monday, April 21 at 7:30 P.M at the Guild
House, the Grad group will hear Mr. Jerry
Wells on "Economic Systems and Individuals."

CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenow at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin Director
Res Ph. NO 5-2665; Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 Morning Service.
7:00 Evening Service.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Dr. Chester H. Loucks and the Rev., Hugh
Pickett, Ministers
Mrs. Beth Mahone, Assistant Student
Counselor
9:45 A.M. The Student Class will study.
11:00 A.M. Sermon-"Religion of the Organiza-
tional Man." Rev. Hugh Pickett, Preaching.
7:00 P.M. Panel Discussion-"Race as a World
Problem." Professor B. James George Jr., of the
University of Michigan. Law School. Other
members of the Panel include: Mr. Adan Zain'
of the United Arab Re'public and Mr. Chiv
Dayal of India.
THE THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY
IN ANN ARBOR
106 East Liberty, 2ND FLOOR
Public Discussion, Wednesday, 8:00 P.M.
Listen to Radio Theosophy, Sundays, 12:15 P.M.
WPAG (1050 kc)., ,
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister
Dr. Fred E. Luchs preaching at 10:45 A.M. on
"Jesus Invitation to the Non-Religious.
Church School at 10:45. for ages Crib through
Junior High.
Wed. 9:30 Devotional Study with Mrs. Luchs.
Student Guild 7:00 in Disciples Church parlor to
hear Mr. Howard Harris of the Ann Arbor
Friends speak on "Atomic Arms for What
End?"
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Herbert R. Lowe, Student Assistant Pastor
Paul R. Eberts, Minister to Students
9:45 A.M. Student Guild Coffee Hour.
10:45 A.M. Worship Service - "The Way, The
Truth and Life," Rev. Paul Eberts.
6:30 P.M. International Supper for Students.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120S. State St.
Merril R. Abbey, L. Burlin Main, William B.
Hutchison, Eugene A. Ransom, ministers.
9:00 and 11:00 A.M. Worship, "Religious Vita-
ity through Dobt."
5:30 P.M. Fellowship Supper.
7:00 P.M. Professor William Alston topic-
"Christian Ethics and Morality."
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
10:00 A.M. Meeting for Worship.
10:00 A.M. Sunday School.
11:30 A.M. Meeting for Worship
11:30 A.M. Adult Study Class.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State & Huron Streets
William . Bennett, Pastor
8:45 and 11:00 Morning Worship Services, "Be
ing Serious with the Word of God."
10:00 Sunday School.
5:45 Student Guild.
7:00 Evening Service, Sermon, "A Mighty Sa-
ior.
Wednesday, 7:30 .M. Prayer Meeting.
WE WELCOME YOU.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and sermon followed
by breakfast and discussion in Canterbury
House.
11:00 A.M. Mornina Prover and Sermon.

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A

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k

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.4.

AV

Well sir, you can imagine what happened. then! William
Jennings Bryan snatched Nell Gwynne from the shadow of the
guillotine at Oslo; Chancellor Bismarck brought in four gushers
in a single afternoon; Enos Slaughter was signed by the Han-
seatic League; Crete was declared off limits to Wellington's
army; and William Faulkner won the Davis Cup for his im-
mortal Penrod and Sam.
But after a while things n and astronomers began
the staggering task of naming all the heavenly bodies. First
man to name a star was Sigafoos. of Mt. Wilson, and the name
he chose was Betelgeuse, after his dear wife, Betelgeuse Sigafoos,
prom queen at Michigan State from 1919 to 1931.
Then the Major Brothers of Yerkes Observatory named stars
after their wives, Ursa and Canis, and Witnick of Harvard

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