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March 30, 1958 - Image 13

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-03-30
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V'

AZJINF

30, 1953

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3day, March

THE MICHI

AIL'

AZIN E

Oing Senator

John ennedy,

After Grim Train Ride to Leningrad
Girls View Puppet Show and Opera,

Memories of Al Smith Return, as Catholic,

Find Moscow a 'Facade'

t

By THOMAS TURNER
Daily Staff Writer
..."the future would see Pres-
idents who are Catholics as
well as Presidents who are
Protestants; if we live long
enough, Presidents who are
Jews as well as Presidents who
are Gentiles."
-Pres. Theodore Roosevelt
TODAY, thirty'years after Her-,
bert Hoover trounced Al Snith
in the last pre-Eisenhower Repub-
lican victory, another Catholic
Democrat looms a strong contend-
-r for the presidential nomination
of his party. Many of the circum-
stances surrounding the potential

candidacy of Senator John Ken-
nedy of Massachusetts are dif-
ferent from those Smith encount-
ered. Others, however, are similar
and there is at least a suspicion
the prejudice which helped elect
Hoover lies dormant and would
work to the advantage of a Ken-
nedy opponent.
Alfred E. Smith, a hard-work-
ing one-time Tammany politician
from New York's East Side, was
elected governor of New York in
1918. He was essentially progres-
sive and made a fine governor.
Though defeated in the 1920's
sharp swing away from Wilson-
ism, he was re-elected In 1922,
and a g a i n in 1924. As the

restaurants, we were hotter than
the food." Air conditioning is ap-
parently not yet approved, so
people crowd the beaches, mostly
wearing underwear; bathing suits
cost too much.
After visits to the Stalin-Lenin
Mausoleum and the cosmopolitan'
right club at the Hotel 6tropole,
the girls prepared to move back
into what we must call the West-
ern Sphere of Influence.
Looking back over this ,eventful
excursion, Pat is mostly agog at
the political implications of it

all: the chance to compare, first
hand, the U.S. and Soviet govern-
mental systems and to observe in
practice the Soviet doctrine of
individual subservience to the
state. She noted many curious and
distorted impressions held by the
Russian people.
Most of the people they met
believed she and Izora were not
at all representative of American
college students but had been
especially selected by our govern-
ment to make a good impression.
She found the Russians have come

to regard Paul Robeson, Theodore
Dreiser and John Steinbeck very
highly. But current rumors that
the bodies of Franklin Roosevelt
and Benny Goodman were left
hanging in Central Park one night
are more difficult to explain,
IZORA WAS MOSTLY upset by
. what she calls "the facade" of
Russian life: expensive parks and
exhibits, but poor living conditions
behind the scenes.
For her, the trip brought a new
understanding of the relative

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POLITICAL. CARTOON-In the 1924-28 presidential races, Al Smith was subjected to a whispering
campaign centering on his religion and the issue of Prohibition of the 18th Amendment.

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1924 Democratic convention ap-
proached, a Catholic was not only
a serious candidate, he had de-
termined support.
And despite then current opin-
ion that the prosperous twenties
belonged to the Republicans, a
good-race seemed to be shaping
up. Fresh scandals in the admin-
istration provided the opposition
with plenty of ammunition. But
viewed in retrospect, the conven-
tion in 1924 shows clearly one of

the major problems Al Smith was
to face, one of the handicaps from
whichKennedy is less but not en-
tirely free.
FOR entering the 1924 conven-
tion Smith had vocal support,.
.but only from one wing of the
party. William G. McAdoo had the
delegates from the dry, rural,
Protestant Midwest and South in
his pocket. The result was the
farcical 103 ballot convention

World famous Swedish 2'4x2' Single Lens Reflex
WASSELBEAD -.nowin a new
advanced model 500 C

which nominated colorless John
William Davis. Insult was added
to injury by the fact that this was
the first convention-to be broad-
cast, and "apathy and Lafollette"
combined to elect Republican Cal-,
vin Coolidge, as Edmund A. Moore
describes it in A Catholic Runs
for President, a Campaign in 1924.
SMITH'S popularity in the East
remained intact between 1924
and 1928, while McAdoo collapsed.
Smith became a sure nominee for
president but a certain loser. He
needed, Author Moore points out,
the crash which hit Hoover 15
months later.
"Had Smith been an .Episco-
palian rather than a Catholic'and
a product of Hyde Park rather
than of New York City . . . he still
would have remained vulnerable
in the South'and West, Moore
isr h.. -

With Carl Zeiss Planar
F:2.8 80mm lens."
With Carl Zeiss Distagon
1 :5.6 60mm wide angle
lens and cut film back
With Carl Zeiss Sonnar
Telephoto F: 4.0 150mm
lens
With Carl Zeiss Sonnar
Telephoto F:5.6 250mm
lens
With Magnifying Hood

RUSSIAN BORDER GUARD
... smiling and suave
,ying oneself for the rigors of the
trip, Izora claims.
Moscow had its parks, too. They
remember, with a trace of anxiety,
being followed by a sinister-look-
ing fellow who eventually trapped
them beside an artificial lake,
bought them some wine, spoke
excellent -English and doubtless
reported the matter to Bulganin
next day.
The Moscow park system serves
a dual function. It provides a
recreational area for the majority
of the population; and a relief
from their overcrowded living
quarters. The parks are also used
to distribute "propaganda," the
term we use for the Russian news.
Pat asked someone about a
soap-box orator shouting at a
large group in a Moscow park.
"That's the world news," she was
told.
ERE IS evidently no water in
Moscow," said Pat, "only bad
Vichy water or warm pop. Every-
one drinks out of the same glass
at lemonade stands, then they get
sick."
Pat visited the immense Univer-
sity of Moscow, where a girl
showed her a rock collection in
her Geology class. She also visited
the only department store for
Moscow's 4 million people, GUM's.
There, one can find ladies un-
derwear in every color but white.
Orange slips cost $17 and up. (TV
sets are more reasonable because
the Government approves of
them).
THE CULTURAL climate is
nourished by both government
and industry. Many companies
give away tickets to plays, operas
and concerts to workers. People
can be seen reading books in
public, this is, in fact, quite com-
mon. The music of Shostakovich,
Tchaikovsky and Prokofiev is
heard on the radio.
Everywhere, though, the subtle
thread of propaganda strings
people along. A Russian version of
-Oklahoma makes "Jud" a wealthy
landowner. The elegant Bolshoi
ballet (with or'chestra wearing no
coats, no ties, rolled up shirt-
sleeves) depicts the peasants
burning down homes of aristo-
crats. Izora was greatly impressed
by the robust Russian ballet- com-
paring it to the more delicate
.French style.
Just outside Moscow is an im-
mense and expensive Agricultural
and Industrial exhibit where each
Republic (or satellite, as we call
them) had a display. Pat and
Izora were allowed to walk through
the displays freely, until they
reached one building only to find
the door quickly locked in their
faces and the lights doused.
Pat thought she saw a model of'j
an atom inside.

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