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March 23, 1958 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-03-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'AGE STX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 1938

AGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, MARCH 23. 1958

High School Championships

MICHIGAN
CLASS A'
Detroit Austin 71, Benton Harbor 68
CLASS 'B'
East Lansing 62, River Rouge 51
CLASS 'C'
West. Mich. Christian 45, Highland
Park St. Benedict 35

CLASS 'DW
Chassell 66, Owasso StL Paul 61
ILLINOIS
Marshall (Chicago) 70, Rock Falls 64

INDIANA
South Side 63, Crawfords-

Fort Wayne
vile 34

NHL SCORES
Chicago 6, Detroit 4
Boston 8, Montreal 5
New York 7, Toronto 0

NBA
Boston 109, Philadelphia 87
St. Louis 99, Detroit 96
(Each team leads 2-0 in best of seven
series)

Boxing"'Probe
NEW YORK (A) -The man
who broke the 1951 basketball
scandals turned his searchlight
on boxing yesterday in what
Iring circles say is a new attempt
to establish underworld links
with the sport.
In a quiet, mysterious fash-
ion, Dist. Atty. Frank S. Hogan
has ordered a grand Jury hear-
ing at Manhattan Criminal
Court April 7. A dozen sum-
monses have bee issued - to
fighters, managers, promoters.
A spokesman for Hogan's of-
fice said therinvestigation was
not the direct result of Friday
night's fight at Madison Square
Garden in which Virgil Akins,
a 2-1 underdog, scored a sur-
prise sixth round knockout over
Isaac Logart. But there was a
tie-in.
Read Daily Classifieds

"

'M' Gym Team Falls To Penn State, 51-45;
NCAA ChampionsWin Meet in Last Event

n,

NOTICE:

By CHUCK KOZOLL
Edging past the Wolverines in
the final tumbling event, Penn
State, NCAA gymnastics cham-
pions, subdued Michigan, 51-45 be-
fore an overflow crowd last night
in the I-M gym.
Moving into the tumbling con-
test, the Wolverines led Penn State
41-39, but the flawless perform-
ances of Nittany Lions' David Du-
laney with a 95.5 first place total
and Graeme Cowan with a run-
nerup 93.5 clinched the meet vic-
tory for the eastern team.
Michigan's Bill Skinner, who
put on a tremendous performance,
failed to twin the judges approval

I'i

bES ophomore Engineers
It has come to the attention of the members
of 61 E, a group by nature sensitive to its own
superior abilities and attainments, that this
same observation is not shared by others, par-
ticularly by the members composing group
60 E. With a repute worthy to defend, the
class of 61 E offers its personal challenge to
the class of 60 E. The challenge is offered in
terms of a manly conquest, vulgarly, a Tug

as he settled for third place in the
deciding event.
Sparking the Wolverines in their
attempt to down Penn were Wolf-
gang Dozauer and Jim Hayslett
who tied for first place on the
parallel bars to surpass a strong
effort by Penn State's Bob Foht.
Stall Wins
Al Stall, whose motionless stand
on the still rings hypnotized the
partisan crowd, edged out Penn's
Frank Donatelli by a score of 90.5
to 89. Dozauer and Nino Marion
contributed balanced efforts on
the rings to take the third and
fourth places in the events.
Spearheading the effortseof
Penn State were their two stellar
all-around pbrformers, Lee Cun-
nigham and Jay Werner. Cunnig-
ham, who performed several un-
usual inverted flips on the high
bar, iced the event with a 93.5
total to 91 for his teammate Wer-
ner.
Moving around with exceptional
precision, Cunnigham garnered
the top place on the side horse.
Werner, whose efforts in the free

exercise event far outdistanced
the pack, took the other first place
for Penn State. The eastern per-
former was also a major factor in
the victory, taking a second on the
high bar, a third on the side horse
and a fourth on the high bar.
Conflicts in the use of two com-
STATISTICS
FREE EXERCISE: 1. Werner -- PS,
94.5; 2. Cunningham - PS, 89.5; 3.
Hayslett - M, 85; 4. Marion -M,
83.5; 5. Dozauer - M, 83.
SIDE HORSE: 1. Cunningham-PS,
88; 2. Hayslett - M, 83; 3. (tie) Wer-
ner-- PS, Marian - M, Doauer-M,
80.
HIGH BAR: 1. Cunningham - PS,
83.5; 2. Werner -PS, 90; 3. Dozauer
--M, 86; 4. Marion -- M, 84.5; 5. Salva-
dove - PS, 84.
PARALLEL BARS: 1. (Tie) Dozauer
M, Hayslett --M, 89.5; 3. Foht - PS,.
87; 4. Werner -PS, 86; 5. Marion -
M, 84.
STILL RINGS: 1. Stall - M, 90.5;
2. Donatelli - PS, 89; 3. Dozauer --
M, 88; 4. Marion - M, 83.5;.5. Werner
_PS, 81.5.
TUMBLING: 1. Dulaney - PS, 95.5;
2. Cowan - PS, 93.5; 3. Skinner -
M, 88; 4. Werner - PS, 86.5; 5. Hays-
lett -- M, 84.5.

petition events forced the Wol-
verines to move the trampoline
event to an exhibition spot. Shin-
ing for the Wolverines in his first
performance since his injury was
Ed Cole who placed first. Cole's
endeavor was highlighted with
several triple twists on the tram-
poline.
Chuck Clarkson followed up
Cole with a well-balanced routine
for second with Jack Eckle break-
ing into competition with a third.
Record Time
Record times were provided in
the other exhibition performance
as Penn State's Phil Mullen, East-
ern Collegiate champion, raced up
the rope in a record time of :02.9.
Vince Neuhauser skimmed the
distance in :03.4 while Michigan's
Dana Larson was able to negotiate
the distance in :03.7.
In a preliminary warmup to the
tumbling contest, Captain Ed Gag-
vlier reinjured his shoulder and
was forced out of the competition.
The extent of Gagnier's injury is
not known at the present time.

U

I

of War.

This determining event will take

place on the two opposing banks of the Huron
River.
Our opponents should be aware of pos-
sible damage to their own apparel and so
judge accordingly.

LAST OPPORTUNITY MONDAY
GIRLS! GIRLS!
HAVE YOU RECEIVED YOUR
S. '
NAARM 0
the magic cold water wash for all wools,
knits and synthetics
YOU MAY ALSO WIN A
REE
BOBBIE BROOKS SWEATER
Come to:
" BUDGET SHOP . . . 611 E. Liberty
or
" KESSEL'S . . . Nickels Arcade

VIEWS DIFFER ON FACILITIES:
Board in Control Regulates Athletic Building Program

JIM HAYSLETT
..ties for first

I

---

YOUR CAR4RR.
OPPORTUN

I

in research and
development of
missile systems

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the
first of a three article series dealing
with the University athletic plant.
Today's article discusses problems
confronted and attempts of the
Board in Control of Intercollegiate
Athletics to meet these problems.)
By CARL RISEMAN
Parts of the University's athletic
plant have been under criticism
lately.
Some have labelled the I - M
building as "inadequate and Yost
Field House as "antiquated."
For example, Earl Riskey, in
charge of Michigan's intramural
sports program, remarked that the
Intramural building was adequate,
for the student body when con-
structed in 1928. But he also stated
that the I-M building does not fill
the recreational needs of the pres-
ent 25,000 students.

Yost Field House was the first
of its kind when it opened in 1924.
But 34 years have elapsed and a
number of students have bemoan-
ed the lack of a new one. The fact
that several other Big Ten schools
have constructed new field houses
has added fuel to the fire.
On the other hand, a number
of the University's athletic facili-
ties have been highly praised.
For example, Bill Stegath, Sports
Director of radio station WUOM
said, "Michigan Stadium is the
finest stadium in the Western
Conference to work in . . . sit in
... and play in."
What are the true facts about
the condition of Michigan's ath-
letic plant?
Before one can discuss the prob-
lems concerning the athletic plant,

certain questions must be an-
swered: Who controls the develop-
ment of the athletic plant and how
is money raised for its develop-
ment?
Controlled by the Board
Controlling the athletic phase
of the University's building pro-
gram is the Board in Control of
Intercollegiate Athletics.
The Board acts as the business
and financial agency of the ath-
letic department and is responsible
for the physical plant develop-
ments of the intercollegiate ath-
letic program. It also cooperates
with the physical education de-
partment on the recreational
phases of the University.
Membership on the Board, ac-
cording to the Regents Bylaws,
shall be as follows: nine members

AT -'
t. >s
California Institute of Technology
JET PROPULSION LABORATORY
PASADENA . CALIFOPN IA
Active participation in the quest for scientific truths.-
Opportunity to expand your knowledge." Individual
responsibility.« Full utilization of your capabilities -
Association with top-ranking men in field
Openings now in these fields
ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING " APPLIED PHYSICS
MATHEMATICS a MECHANICAL, METALLURGICAL,
AERONAUTICAL AND CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
Systems Analysis " Inertial Guidance " Computer
Equipment Instrumentation Telemetering . Fluid
Mechanics." Heat Transfer . Aerodynamics " Propellants
Materials Research
U.S. CITIZENSHIP REQUIRED

When you give him a tie from Artisans,
1 0
SIT'S BOUND TO BE SPECIAL .. o
YOU'LL BE PROUD to give him a tie from a collec-
tion that is so different, so distinctive and in such good
O taste. Only 2.5 0
ARTISANS gift shop ... 1122 So. University
____ ow O PEN'
"TO SELL YOU SLEEP"
AT FACTORY-TO-YOU SAVINGS
WE MAKE IT-YOU SAVE $$$
Hollywood Ensemble
Complete with head boards;

I

the city slicker !
Made to the specifications of every
busy woman who wants to transport
her handbag "necessities" whether
she's a tourist or at home. One
side is the clasp-close handbag
with zipper section.. . the other
side is a large, open tote (also with
zipper section) for carrying
magazines, umbrellas, lunch, other
paraphernalia:

of the University Senate including
the Athletic Director (H. O. "Fritz"
Crisler) and the Dean of Men
(Walter B. Rea) who are ex of-
ficio membews; three alumni and
two member~s of the student body
(James Van Pelt and John Herrn-
stein).
The Board Chairman is Athletic
Director Crisler. The Board is re-
sponsible to the Regents.
The Board as policy maker.
maps out the entire intercollegiate
athletic building program and co-
operates with the University on
the recreational building program.
The Fiscal Agency
As the fiscal agency, the Board
has complete power to collect and
dispense of funds to carry out its
building program.
Where does the Board acquire
its funds?
The athletic building program
and also its maintainence, has
been financed by receipts from
athletic events such as football,
basketball and hockey games.
Thus the Board °uses a self
liquidating fund. It collects the
receipts from the athletic events
and in turn uses the money to
build and maintain the athletic
plant.
"We are the only state institu-
tion not to use University or legis-
lative funds for plant develop-
ment," declared Crisler.
The department's self - liqui-
dating fund financed the construc-
tion of Yost Field House, Michigan
Stadium, the Intramural Building
and every other building concerned
with athletics on this campus with
the exception of the Women's
Swimming Pool.
However, the University fur-
nishes the funds for the maintain-
ence of Waterman and Barbour
gymnasiums, Women's swimming
pool and part of the I-M building.
All the buildings devoted to inter-
collegiate athletics are maintained
by the department's self - liqui-
dating fund.
Thus, with the increased cost of
maintainence and a slight decrease
in athletic receipts in the past
year, most of the funds of the
Board were expended preventing
the immediate expansion of plant
facilities such as a new Field House
and additions to the I-M building.

1.

I

i

$3988

$4988

$5988

FOAM RUBBER MATTRESS . . . $39.50
BUNK BEDS'.... . . . complete, $79.95
CRIB MATTRESS-6-year size . $ 7.88
OTHER MATTRESSES . as low as $ 7.88
Box Springs to match ...................... $19.88
"SPECIAL RATES ON QUANTITY ORDERS"
hSS
216 East Huron Street
In the Center, next to City Hall NO 2-1626
CONVENIENT TERMS - FREE DELIVERY
Open Mondays 'till 8:30 P.M.- Other days 9:30 A.M.- 5:30 P.M.

$10,5

y>a

ON CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
March 24

WOO

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MAIN AT LIBERTY ANN ARB

For that EASTER Look
A COLLEGIATE
HAIRSTYLING
for all the family
0 AIR-CONDITIONED
0 11 BARBERS
DASCOLA BARBERS
Near Michigan Theatre

I

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PIZZA
Free Delivery
NO 8-9604
or
NO 5-5705

Pop tie-#it

PIZZA
Free Delivery
NO 8-9604
or
NO 5-5705

.

5577 PLYMOUTH RD.

There needn't be. You can get a
head start on your savings pro-
gram by beginning now, white
you're in college.
Life insurance offers you a combi.
nation of protection and savings,
and by starting your program now
you will have the advantage of

DELIVERY
HOURS:
Monday thru Thursday,
9 P.M. to 12 midnight
Friday and Saturday,
5 P.M. to 1 AM.
Sunday, 12 noon
to 12 midnight

DELIVERY
HOURS:
Monday thru Thursday,
9 P.M. to 12 midnight
Friday and Saturday,
5 P.M. to 1 A.M.
Sunday, 12 noon
to 12 midnight

I '~ < I r

11

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