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February 06, 1958 - Image 23

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-02-06

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Education
Financing
Suggested
President A. Whitney Griswold
of. Yale University recently called
for a substantial increase in the
proportion of the nation's wealth
which goes to higher education.
He- proposed the plan to insure
continued strengthening of the
American educational system in,
the face of the inflation which is
attacking it on two fronts.
Pres. Griswold pointed out that
the two-fold nature of inflation is
"partly a dilution of educational
values caused by an inflation of
the demand for higher education.",
He added that this demand "is
expected to double the present en-
rollment of our colleges and uni-
versities by 1970."
The second part of this infla-
tionary nature is an economic in-
flation "in which the bare costs
of existence are outracing the
University's income."
From his review of Yale's posi-
tion in the national educational
economy, President Griswold list-,
ed four conclusions. The first is
''since Yale cannot stop the
economic inflation, it will have to
learn to keep up with it." He
thought Yale charges must be
made to reflect the costs of the
Universit more accurately.
He said that Yale must also find
new sources of income, and that
it must be bolder in exploring all
possible sources of income than it
has been in the past.
His fourth conclusion is that
Yale "must realize that all such.
exploration . . forces us out of
our old, familiar private ways into
a competition much more severe."
Math Award
Bill. Proposed
A proposal to award $500 schol-
I arships to every high school senior
who can pass a fairly difficult
mathematics test has been made
in Congress.
Reps. Melvin Price (D-Ill.) and
J. E. Van Zandt (R-Pa.) sug-
gested the plan, which came as
the government began its drive to
get a four and one-half billion
dollar education program thrpugh
Congress.
Administrators have testified at
public' hearings conducted jointly
by two House education subcom-
mittees.

Dental Medal
Given to Jay
By Academ
Prof. Philip Jay, of the School
of Dentistry, 'was awarded the
Fauchard gold medal and citation
for 1957 at ceremonies in Chicago
on Feb. 1.
A former dean of the University
School of Dentistry, Dr. Russell
W. Bunting, read the citation.
The Pierre Fauchard Academy,
a service organization for den-
tists, presents the award annual-
ly to a man whom the Academy:

FOR 1958-59:
EMC Asks
$3 Million
Governor G. Mennen Williams
has proposed a budget of $3,489,-
055 for Eastern Michigan College's
operating expenses in 1958-9.
The proposal is $275,979 more
than last year's operating budget
at the Ypsilanti bo llege, butg$323,-
304 less than the amount requested
by the college, according to Dr.
Eugene B. Elliott, Eastern Michi-
gan president.
Most of the funds cut from the
proposed budget were planned for
salaries and wages, for 60 new
positions at the college. The ma-
jority of these were for faculty
positions with the remainder for
administrative, maintenance, and
clerical personnel.
The college also requested $3,-
079,047 in capital outlay funds.
for the 1958-9 fiscal year. These
included construction of a new
physical recreation building and a
new arts building.
Eastern Michigan also seeks a
unit on its proposed physical
science building, and funds for a,
teacher education building and an
instructional services building.
The budget was based on an
expected enrollment of 5,200 stu-
dents, and includes fundstderived
from tuition. The legislature, will
be asked only to make up the dif-
ference between the tuition and
the proposed budget.

FULLY EQUIPPED
LIGHTWEIGHT BICY4
Including a Set of
Side Baskets Already Iun
Durable Lock, and a '
Regular $59.95
INTRODUCTORY OF
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Authori
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CUSHNM
a complete SCOOT
bike repair and
shop Motor
i
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Just 4 Blocks West of State Stree

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for
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By TOM, HENSHAW
lated Press Newsfeatures Writer
ew Algeria may be looming.
e embattledFrench in an all
)rgotten corner of their vast
African empire.
place is the Cameroons, a
;le of jungle, plains and
tains at the strategic elbow
West Africa joins the Con-
ance holds it under trustee-1
or the United Nations.
trouble comes from an out-
.Communist-backed terror
known as the Union of the
es of the Cameroons (UPC),
has slain 32 persons and
pped 17 ,in the past 10 weeks.
Terrorism Curtailed?
e. Frencha say terrorism has
curtailed but indications
other quartersare that inter-
nal Communism is about to
rthe little known land a
piece of rebelliond
-ameroons delegate, Dr. Felix
nie, attended the recent Red
nated Afro-Asian Conference
iro. Moscow Radio identified
as "a noted figure in the
roons nationalist movement."
I the Cameroons were accord-
seat on the 10-member secre-
of the Afro-Asian People's
arity Council, an outgrowth
e conference. Other members:
a and Red China.
Hard Core Small
e rebel UPC is led by a sha-
native figure, French-edu-
Ruben Um Nvobe; whose
-core followers, estimated at
o 700, fear and worship him
witch doctor.
meroons Premier Andrea-'

Marie M'biola recently offered am-
nesty to those terrorists who quit
Nyobe and the UPC but the offer
has not met with notable success.
Despite his small following,
Nyobe's influence has been large,
particularly in the Bamileke and
Sanaga-Maritime administrative
districts where most of the recent
violence has occurred.
Caneroons Split
The Cameroons - came under
French rule after World War I
when the French and British split
the German colonies in Africa
between them. A British section
of the Cameroons is administered
as part of Nigeria.
A United . Nations mission re-
cently commended France for
making satisfactory progress in
economic development and edu-.
eational advancement in its part
of the trusteeship.
In general elections last month,?
natives (about 3,000,000) and Eu-
ropeans (about 14,000) voted on an
equal basis. Moderates who favor
continued coop eration with France
won a majority in the 70-member
assembly.
Independence Goal
The assembly currently is con-
sidering a statute that would give
the Cameroons more local auton-
omy. The statue is expected to be
ready for presentation to the
French Parliament and to the
people of the 'Cameroons for refer-
endum next month. French inde-
pendence is planned.
Economically, the Cameroons
'has been suffering from a decrease
in value of palm oil, one of its

major products. Recently, gold has
been discovered near Batouri.
The land is noted as the home-
land of the gorilla and for the
pygmy native tribes who inhabit
the forests along the Sanaga
River. The outstanding physical
feature is Mt. Cameroon, an active
volcano on the British-held coast.
Germans Arrived First
Germany annexed the Came-
roons by treaty on July 15, 1884,
beating the colonial-minded Brit-
ish and Frenc" by a matter of
days. The British, pens in hand,
arrived July 20 and the French
July 26.
It -took the combined'British-
French forces a year and a,, half
to' conquer the German-held
Cameroons during the early part
of World War I. Britain and
France divided the ,ountry under
4eague of N'ations mandate in
1922.
The section adrinistered by the
British is smaller (34,000 square
miles) than the 'French (166,800
square miles). Its population of
about one and orne-half million
contains less than 1,000 Euro-
peans."
Little trouble has been noted to
date in the British section of thf
colony, due both to the size differ-
ence and the smaller number of
Europeans living there.,

Courtesy University News Service
PROF. PHILIP JAY
....wins 'Fauchard medal
feels has made outstanding con-
tributions to dentistry. The medal
is their top service award.
Prof. Jay was honored for his
work and research in dental caries
control through the development j
and utilization of laboratory tests
and procedures.
He established the first."dental
caries laboratory here while Dr.
Bunting was dean. Dr. Bunting
initiated the dental caries re-
search program at the University.
Saliva samples from dental pa-
tients in all 48 states and all prov-
inces of-Canada are sent to Prof.
Jay's laboratory. Technicians de-
termine the lactobacillus count in
each specimen and 'report back to
the dentist.
Amount of tooth decay, Prof.
Jay says, is directly related to the
number of lactobacillus in saliva.
After determining the lactobacil-
lus level, the dentist may help a
patient reduce decay by prescrib-
ing strict adherence to a special
low-sugar diet.

Wednesday "Specials

/.

SAVEI

s ONE SHIRT finished
FREE with every $2.00
worth 'of dory c 'lean-
ing. 4

* TEN CENTS OFF
any $1.00 "or mor
worth of laund ry.

. # ,:.

MONEY'

* ONE - DAY SERVICE on wash pants;
lob cdats and flat work.

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FORTIFY YOUR PREJUDICES
with some concrete evidence gathered
by living among other nationalities at

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Expertly prepared by our special pizza pie maker and
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Which side of the desk will you be on

* CARRIER

* TOOL BAG

five years from now?

CHOICE OF COLORS

#.

The executive side-if you pick the right
business. Michigan Bell is looking for
young men who want to get into a fast-
growing company and grow with it.

excellent pay from the beginning, with
regular increases. Extra benefits insure
security. And special on-the-job training
will qualify you for bigger jobs ahead.
'"ep mn wehire todav 'will be" leaders

CAMPUS' FASTEST GROWI NG HOBBY SHOP

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TAVK Ai9T SERVIE ~AVAIL ABE

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