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March 15, 1958 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-03-15

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THEMICHIGANDAILY

aetion

Asked

Mezzano

Sallade's
Bonds Bill-

Louis Mezzano (D-Wake-
yesterday suggested the
crap Rep. George W. Sal-
R - Ann Arbor) proposed
ogram to cover state con-
n needs.
e originally had proposed
ililon dollar bond issue to
he five-year construction
the state. Recently, Sal-
ended his bill so the bond-
ram would only cover the
needs for college and uni-
needs.
would only call" for a 60
dollar bond issue, the reve-
m which would be spent
ive-year period. According
plan, not more than 12,
dollars could be spent in
year.
riticized by Williams
allade proposal was called
"to escape responsibility"
* Frank D. Williams (D-
S"I can't go for the idea
ling to pay for what we
pay for now," he said, "and
e who come after us, the
f today, get stuck with the
e added he was "disgusted
lack of backbone of every
of the House."
Robert E. Faulkner (R-
, has proposed a different
financing state-wide build-
ds. His plan calls for the
i of a building authority,
securities could be ex-
i for the bonds held by the
s Trust Fund.
plan would, according to
o, have the advantage of
ing funds immediately. It
require a constitutional
nent.
G. Mennen Williams offer-
alternate proposal which
r the setting up of a college
authority. This authority
e financed by a bond issue
nillion dollars, and would
all college construction
ng during its existence.

Used Books
Sale Planned
ByLibrary
A special collection of ,000
secondhand books will go on sale
Monday and Tuesday in the Main
Library, according to Robert H.
Muller, assistant director of Uni-
versity libraries.
The sale, to be held in the for-
mer basement study hall of the
Main Library, will continue from
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Prices begin
at 15c, with most going for less
than a dollar, Muller said.
Books to be sold are mostly extra
copies from University libraries
and duplicate gifts to the Univer-
sity. There may be some valuable
books included in the collection,
Muller added.
The sale, first held at the Uni-
verilty for five years,, is open to
all University staff members and
students. Income from the project
will be used to purchase new li-
brary books.
"I don't knowi how much truth
there is in it," Muller added, "but
I have heard that at the last sale
a line formed long before the sale
opened and extended all the way
to the Romance Languages Build-
ing."
SSurvey
SubutrbNeeds
In Recreation

Red Smear
Three students were dismissed
from Ohio State University re-
cently after officials said the
trio sprayed 118 campus park-
ing meters and one parking lot
entrance with scarlet paint.
The three students were ap-
prehended by a campus police-
man who said he fired two1
shots into the air to bring them
to a halt. In their possession
was a paint sprayer filled with
the school-color paint.
Five members of Alpha\Sigma
Phi fraternity, to which the
three belonged, voluntarily be-1
gan cleaning the meters al-
though disclaiming any previ-
ous knowledge of the vandalism.
Wilson Wins
Fellowship
George Balch Wilson, Jr., of the
School of Music was named winner
of a Rome Prize Fellowship in the
field of musical composition for
1958-59.
Wilson is a teaching fellow in
theory and composition.
The lward, which begins on Oct.
1, is worth approximately $3,000.
This sum includes stipend, travel
allowances, free studio and resi-
dence at the Academy.
Wilson received his Bachelor of
Music in 1951 and his Master of
Music in 1953. Both degrees were
from the University.He studied
with Homer Keller and Ross Lee
Finney.
He won a Fulbright Fellowship
in 1953 and studied with Jean
Absil at the Conservatory Royal de
Mfusique in Brussels and in Paris
with Nadia Boulanger. He has also
studied at Tanglewood, and at
the School of Fine Arts, Foun-
tainbleau.
The Rome Prize Fellowships are
given each year to approximately,
14 promising young men in the
arts.

Model legislation providing
states with workable control over
peacetime uses of atomic energy,
now before the State Legislature,
was created by the Law School at
the request of Governor G. Men-
nen Williams.
Basic stipulations of the pro-
posed law are appointment of a
state director of atomic activities
and creation of a safety standards
board. Resulting standards would
be enforced through existing state
agencies.
The plan would be financed by
registration fees- paid by private

BEFORE STATE LEGISLATURE:
State A-EnergyLaws Created at 'U

owners of reactors and x-ray ma-
chines, and commercial and medi-
cal users of radioactive supplies.
Educational and government agen-
cies would not be subject to these
fees.
Would Be First
If the plan is adopted, Michigan
will be the first state to create an
agency to establish uniform stand-
ards for the entire state.
"If the states want to assume
their traditional role in health and
safety matters in the field of,
atomic energy, they should make
sure they have agencies with the

power to do the job," Prof. Samu
D. Estep of the law school said.
The proposed safety standan
boards would be expected to fc
mulate comprehensive policies a:
programs for control of radiati
hazards, establish radiation safe
standards, appoint enforceme
agencies,,.keep records of radiati
sources in the state, and distribt
the information it obtains to t
proper government agencies.
All state agencies as well, w
be asked to consider the effect
atomic energy.

Come

to Church

Sunday

-Daily-Robert Kanner
A LAUTREC FAVORITE-Kicking her leg skyward, Jane AvriI
was the subject for many of Lautrec's paintings. He first began
'painting posters for MoulinRouge in 1891. This one is among his
most famous.
TnlueLurcA rt
Displayedby WesCt Quad
*

The University's Department of
Community and Adult Education
will contact approximately 1,000
families in the Birmingham-
Bloomfield Hills-Troy region in a
survey of local recreational needs
and facilities.
Recommendations will be maie
for coordination of existing serv-
ices and facilities, and for elimina-
tion of duplicate effort and ex-
pense. The survey will be con-
ducted during the next month.

Begins
Tour

. Kenneth K. Landes of the
Y department caught a plane
kyo in Seattle late last week
in a month-long world tour.
plans to wind up in the
Ftst-where he will spend
>f his time-early in April.
11 study the geology of the
uum-rich area and examine
ce favoring the theory of
rth's contraction, which he
pported.
re beginning his tour, Prof.'
s attended, the Convention
erican Association of Petrol-
Geologists in Los Angeles;
he presented Raymond p.
president of the Geological
r ofAmerica,' with an hon-

By RONALD KOTULAK
High stepping can-can girls,
whirling quadrille dancers, and
dcu'hk Frenchmen laughing lust-
fully are suspended in the silence
of an art exhibit honoring Henri
Toulouse-Lautrec and his Paris
of the gay 1890's.
The reproductions of Lautrec's
originals, compiled by Russell C.
Gregory, Grad., hang in an alcove
near the main entrance to West
'Quadrangle.
The recessed room is noticeable
for its silence, especially because
of Lautrec's captive entertainers
threatening to dance off their can-
vases. The stillness is contrasted
to the stirring strains of Gaite
Parisienne portrayed in Lautrec's
use of rowdy colors.
Paris Scenes Famed
Although Lautrec is noted for
his scenes of Paris night life, the
exhibit includes several of his
more incisive portraits of women,
some lounging in the salons of the
Rue Des Moulins.
Lautrec died at 37, but his life
was filled with hective activity.'
Born inAlbi on Nov. 24, 1864 to
Alphonse de Toulouse-Lautrec-
Monfa and Adele Tapie de Celey-
ran, he early showed a precocious
talent for drawing.

In 1878 two successive accidents
broke both of his thighs and
stunted the growth of his legs. He
turned to painting, which his par-
ents encouraged, to compensate
for his infirmity.
Moved to Montmartre
Moving to Paris in 1886, he
rented a studio at the heart of
Montziiarte's night life which gave
him an unquenchable array of
subjects for his work.
Here he frequented -Cirque Fer-
nando, Bruant's famous Cabaret
Artistique, Le Mirliton and Le
Moulin de la Galette. He designed
his first poster for Moulin Rouge
in 1891, using a new elliptical
technique which soon began to
appear in his painting.
One of his favorite subjects
during this period was the tantal-
izing and springhtly Jane Avril
who danced at Moulin Rouge.
By 1898, his health shaken by
incessant indulgence in night life
and heavy drinking, he was con-
fined in St. James' Clinic where he
painted the famous "Le Cirque"
series from memory.;
Foreseeing the end, he went
home to the Chateau de Malrome
and died on Sept. 9, 1901.

I

I

i Nomm- I

9

1! r (By the Author of "Ratty Round the Flag, Boys!"and,
"Barefoot Boy with Cheek.")

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

if

The first thought that comes into our minds upon entering
college is, of course, marriage. But how many of us go about
seeking mates, as I like to call them, in a truly scientific manner?
Not many, you may be sure.
So let us today make a scientific survey of the two principal
causes of marriage-personality need and propinquity.
Personality need means that we choose mates because they
possess certain qualities that complete and fulfill our own per
sonalities. Take, for example, the case of Alanson Duck.
As a freshman Alanson made a fine scholastic record, played
varsity scrabble, and was president of his class. One would
think that Alanson was a totally fulfilled man. But he was not.
There was something lacking in his life, something vague and
indefinable that was needed to make his personality complete.
Then one day Alanson discovered what it was. As he was
walking out of his class in Flemish pottery, a fetching coed
named Grace Ek offered him a handsome red and white pack
and said, "Marlboro?"
"Yes!" he cried, for all at once he knew what he had been
needing to round out his personality-the hearty fulfillment of
Marlboro Cigarettes, the soul-repairipg mildness of their fine
tobacco, the easy draw of their unparalleled'flter, the ease and
convenience of their crushproof flip-top box. "Yes, I will take a
Marlboro!" cried Alanson. "And I will also take you to wife
if you will have me!".

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw at Berkshire
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10 A.M. Discussion Group: Mrs. Karl B. Lohmann,
Jr. on: Ann Arbor's Urban Renewal program.
11 A.M. Sermon by Rev. Eugene Sparrow: "Where
there is no Vision."
7 P.M. Unitarian.Student Group meeting.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.'
Merril R. Abbey, L. Bursin Main, Williams.
Hutchison, Eugene A. Ransom , ministers.
9:30 A.M. Discussion Group: "What Methodists.
Bel ieve"
900 and 11:00 Worship Topic:"Not Trapped by
Opportunity." Dr. Abbey.
5:30 Fellowship Supper.
6:45 Worship and Program. "Jesus' Teachings on
Prayer." Eugene A. Ransom.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister.
9:45 A.M. Church School.
10:45 A.M. Sermon: "The Kingdom of God."
THE CONGREGATIONALS AND DISCIPLES
STUDENT GUILD
524 Thomson Street
J. Edgar Edwards, Director
Donna Hamilton, Associate
Sunday 7:00 The Student Guild will hear Miss
Amber Van, counselor for Protestant founda-
tion for International Students, speak on "The
World on your Door Step" in the Disciples
Church parlor at 7:00 p.m.
The Grad Group will meet Monday night at 7:30
at Guild House to hear Dr. Richard Meier, Re-
search Associate at Mental Health 'Research
Center, speak on "The Origin of the Scientific
Species."
Tuesday noon-Social Action meeting.
4:30-6:00 Tuesday afternoon, Guild House: Cof-
fee break.
Friday, March 21,' 1958 there will be a luncheon
discussion at the Guild House on Lent.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill at S. Forest
Rev. H. O. Yoder, Pstor
Gerald Kissell, Intern
SUNDAY-
9:00 &11:00 a.m. Worship Services.
10:00a.m. Bible Study.
6:00 p.m. Supper.
7:00 p.m. Speaker: Raymond Knauff, Ph.D.
"Relation of Science to Religion."
TUESDAY-7:15 p.m. Course: "Christ and Cul-
ture."
WEDNESDAY-7:15 p.m. Lenten Service.
FRI DAY-7:15 p.m. Graduate Group.
SATURDAY-7:30 p.m. "Splash" Party.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs; Minister
Junior Church workship, Douglas Chapel 10:45
Church School for ALL AGES 10:45
"THE GOOD WHICH EVIL CAN DO" by Dr. Fred
E. Luchs 10:45
Student Guild 7:00 at Memorial Christian Church.
Miss Amber Van, Protestant Counsellor to In-
ternational Students, speaking oy"The World
At Your Doorstep."
CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1131 Church St.
Dr. E. H. Palmer, Minister
10:30 Sermon: "Christ's Sacraments. IV The-
Lord's Supper."
7:00 P.M. "God's Blueprint of the Future. VII-
The Millennium."
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. NO 5-2665; Office Ph. NO 8-742 1
10:00 Morning Service.
7:00 Evening Service.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and sermon foliow-
ed by breakfast and discussion in Canterbury
House.
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
5:30 P.M. Buffet Supper.
6:30 P.M. Evening Program.
8:00 P.M. Evensong.

ST. NICHOLAS' ORTHODOX CHURCH
414 N. Main St.
Rev. Fr. Andrew Missiras, Pastor
Saturday Evening-Vespers 8:00 P.M.
Sunday Services-Matins 9:30 A.M.
Divine Liturgy (in Greek) 10:30 A.M. to 12 noon.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. Sunday Morning Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday, Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339-'South
Main Street. Reading room hours are: Mon-
day 11:00 A.M. to 8:30 P.M. Tuesday - Sat-
urday 11:00 A.M. to 5 P.M. Sunday 2:30 to
4:30 P.M. 1
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Herbert R. Lowe, Student Assistant Pastor
Paul R. Eberts, Minister to Students
9:45 a.m. Coffee Hour.
10:45 Rev. Press preaches on, "Singleness of Pur-
pose. "
7:00sp.m. Discussion roup.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Paul V. Matheson, Assistant

11

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Sunday Masses: 8:00 9:30, 11:00 A.M. and
12:00'noon.
Weekday Masses: 6:30, 7:00, 8:00 and 9:00
A.M.
Novena Devotions: Wednesday evening, 7:30 P.M.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 P.M.
Classes each evening in Christian Doctrine, Apolo-
getics, Church. History, Scholastic Philosophy,
in the Fatbger Richard Center.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
L. C. Utley, Minister,
SUNDAYS: 10:00, 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.;
WEDNESDAYS: 7:30 P.M.
Television: Sundays, 2:30 P.M., Channel 6.
Lansing.
Radio: Sundays 5:30 P.M. WXYZ 1270
For transportation to services Dial NO 3-8273.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETIN'G
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
10:00 A.M. Meeting for Worship.
10:00 A.M. Sunday School.
11:30 A.M. Meeting' for Worship
11:30 A.M. Adult StudyClass.
THE THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY
IN ANN ARBOR
106 East Liberty, 2ND FLOOR
Public Discussion, Wednesday, 8:00 P.M.
Listen to Radio Theosophy, Sundays, 12:15 P.M.
WPAG (1050 kc).

11

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L u

I

"La!" she exclaimed; throwing her apron over her face. But
after a while she removed it and they were married. Today
they live happily in Baffin Land where Alanson is with an
otter-glazing firm and Grace is a bookie.
Propinquity, the second principal cause of marriage, simply
means closeness. Put a boy and a girk close together for a sus-
tained period of time and their proximity will certainly ripen
into love and their love into marriage. A perfect example is
the case of Fafnir Sigafoos.
While a freshman at Louisiana State University, Fafnir was
required to crawl through the Big Inch pipeline as part of his
fraternity initiation. He entered the pipe at Baton Rouge and,
alone and joyless, he proceeded to crawl north.

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State & Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor

8:45 and '11:00 Morning Worship Services,S
mon, "An Unfinished Task."
10:00 A.M.'Sunday School.
5:45 Student Guild.
7:00 Evening Service, Sermon, "Chosen
Christ."

Ser-
by

41:

As he passed Lafayette, Indiana, ke was agreeably surprised
to be joined by a comely girl named Mary Alice Isinglass, a
Purdue freshman, who, oddly enough; had to crawl through
the Big Inch as part of her sorority initiation.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
and STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Ronald L. Johnstone, Vicar
Sunday at 9:15 and at 10:45: Worship Services,
with sermon by the pastor, "The Completeness
of the Atonement."
Sunday at 9:15 and at 10:45: Bible Study Groups.
Sunday at 2:00: Meet at the Chapel to go to Flint
for joint Gamma Delta meeting with the Flint
chapter. No supper-program at the Chapel.
Wednesday ot 7:30 P.M.: Lenten Vesper Service,
with sermon by the vicar, "View the Lord of
Life Arraigned."
PRESBYTERIAN STUDENT CENTER
at the. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
Rev. William S. Baker, Campus Minister
Miss Patricia Pickett, Assistant
SUNDAY
Church Worship Service, 9:00 a.m., 10:30
A.M,. 12:00.
10:30 A.M. Seminar on "Basic Christian Be-

Alligator All-Weather Coats $9.50 to $24.75

Chatting amiably as they drawled through Ohio, Pennsyl-

11

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CiDCT R d DTlCT irMl lVrl4

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