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March 14, 1958 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-03-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN AIL'!'

DECIDE TWO GA

o

"

i Delta Phi Earns 35-34 Win

'I

Scoring

Champ

Bg AL SINAI4
first puce playoffs in, the
ro Fraternity basketball
ended in identical fashion
ht at the I-M Building.
th 'games fouls were com-
with the score tied as the
izzer rang.'
Delta Phi's Dick Emens
s shot as the Phi Delts de-
Nu Sigma Nu, a perennial
werhouse, 35-34.
ver, Spence BeMent of Al-
hi Sigma missed his tie
chance against Phi Alpha
The game went into over-
ith Phi 'Alpha Kappa fi-
inning, 24-23, on another
toss.
gma Nu started their' game
ping to an early lead as if
re set on adding another
their long list of chapin-
>s. Dick Van Schoick sank

"

,

four out of Nu Sig's first five
baskets on sensational long one-
handers.
- Theinspired Phi Delt team, out
to avenge a two-point loss to- Nu
Sigma Nu suffered in last year's
finals, fought back and led 22-20,
at the end of the first half.
Fraley Sparkles
Sparked by the shooting of Ron
Fraley, they maintained a slim
lead throughout most of the sec-
ond half, broken only by four ties.
Finally, with about 1:30 left,
Phi Delt opened up a four-point
lead. Nu Sigma Nu, being used to
pressure, played heads up ball and
tied the game 34-34, on a shot by
Van Schoick. Then, Emens sank
his clutch foul shot to win the'
game for the Phi Delts.
When a score is tied at the end
of regulation play in I-M basket-
ball, an overtime period is played-

until a team scores the first two
points. The overtime between Al-
pha Chi -Sigma and Phi Alpha
Kappa lasted seven minutes be-
fore Paul Newhof sank a foul shot
for the second of the Phi Alpha
Kappa's overtime points.,
The game began as a battle of
tall men, between Alpha Chi Sig-
ma's 6'6" Jim Beissel and 6'5"
Spence BeMent, and Phi Alpha
Kappa's 6'6" Paul Newhof and 6'4'
Bob Tazelon. However, poor shoot-
ing characterized the entire game
which remained close from the
very first minute of play. At one'
time Alpha Chi Sigma held a
three point lead which turned out
to be the greatest difference at
any point in the game.
In a highly amusing game, the
Seven Dwarfs easily defeated the
Michigan Philippines, 67-36, in a
third place playoff. The Seven

Dwarfs were anything but small
as almost every man on their
team was over six feet tall. On
the other hand, the Michigan
Philippines had no player over
six feet. Dale Keller was high
scorer with 28 points.
McGreevy Scores 27
Tom McGreevy scored 27 out
of Phi Chis 39 points to lead his
team to a 39-37 victory over Alpha
Kappa Psi. The Alpha Kappa Psi
team put on a spirited spurt in
the second half, but it wasn't
enough to catch the Phi Chi's.
In a fourth place playoff, Phi
Delta Chi demonstrated a superb
defense as they held Phi Delta
Epsilon to four points in defeat-
ing them, 26-4. However, the Phi
Delta Epsilon was handicapped by
the absence of four regulars who
were taking exams.
Other Scores
CXS Seniors 44, Rodents' 31
Buckeyes 45, Beantowners 26
Psi Omega 34, Delta Theta P1 31
Delta Sigma Delta 37, Phi Rho Sigma
Exhibition
Baseball
San Francisco 13, Chicago (N) 2
Detroit 8, Kansas City 6
Washington 9, Philadelphia_ 1
Cleveland 2, Baltimore 0
St. Louis 3, Chicago (A) 2.

St. Joseph
Cagers Win
In NIT Tilt
NEW YORK ) -- St. Joseph's
of Philadelphia and St. John's of
New York each got offf on the
wrong foot last night, but they
quickly righted themselves and
won first round games in the Na-
tional Invitation Basketball Tour-
nament.
St. Joseph's turned back St. Be-
ter's of Jersey City 83-72, after St.
John's outscored Butler at one
time 12-2 in the second half tot
move to a 76-69 victory in the
hard fought opener before 13,114
spectators at Madison Square
Garden.
The Philadelphia team will meet
St. Bonaventure in a quarter fi-
nal game tomorrow night.
The St. John's triumph enabled
the ftedmen to advance into the
quarter-final round where they
will face Utah tomorrow after-
noon.
The Redmen, after trailing for
13 minutes, rallied for a 353 edge
at the intermission.
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1

ARCHIE DEES
... Indiana center

CS CAGE MATERIAL: --
erigo Faces Recruitng Problems

'4

is the second 'in a- series of
icles discussing the Michigan
aU team. This article will deal
:ruiting and scholarships.)
By AL JONES

Big Ten statistics, released yes-
terday, officially crowned Hoosier
Archie Dees as the conference
scoring leader for the second
straight -year.
The deadly pointmaker com-
piled 362 -tallies - and a solid 40
point margin over the runner-up,
Minnesota's George Kline.
Figures also showed that Mich-
igan State's Johnny Green estab-
lished a record .538 field goal per-
centage and laid claim to the re-
bound mark automatically, since
the latter statistics were kept for
the first time this season.
Sam Gee, of Indiana, hit on 46
of 50 at the free throw line for.
anoter ecord.'

The Prices Do Not Include Sales T9X

[, Phone NOrmandy 2-9442 Fast Carry-Out

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"We needed a 'big man'."
This statement has been echoed
y Michigan basketball coach Bill
erigo and re-echoed by many
rolverine cage followers at the
id of every recent season.
Many court fans have stated all
his winter that the Michigan
am could have been great-IF
aey had had a big center.
Still another group feels that
ore than a center was needed
nce the basic caliber of 'basket-
DLU players here is not as good'
s at other Big Ten schools.
Recruiting Fails
Whichever group is right, the
roblem lies in the fact that
ichigan's recruiting system has
>t brought the necessary caliber
players here.
Perigo and Athletic Director H.
"Fritz" Crisler point out that
ere is a basic problem 'w'hich
iuch be faced when athletes are
ught for Michigan teams. The
ademnic standards for entrance,
id subsequent success in studies
re, greatly limits the percentage
good athletes that Wolverine
romoters can interest.

, Phone Normandy 2-9442

"The list of present college play-
ers that MIGHT have come to
Michigan would make a fine col-
legiate team," Perigo says.
Stars Turned Down
Wilt Chamberlain, the great
Kansasx All-American, had his
choices limited to three schools-
Michigan, Indiana and Kansas.
His first choice was here, until he
failed to meet the entrance re-
qtuirements,
"We have lost many athletes to
Michigan State, including' Bob An-y
deregg and M. C. Burton's younger
brother, Ed," Perigo remarked.
Criser states that "there is little
doubt that it is the academics.that
has hurt us. Of course, this is the
same--for all of our teams."
Aid Disadvantage
He also pointed out another
disadvantage that Michigan faces
in recruitig. "Since we are a
member of the Big Ten," Crisler
says, "we are obliged to follow the
new aid plan. This means that
schools from other leagues can
often outbid us.
"The Eastern schools have an
aid plan that is a little higher
than the Big Ten's. We set ours
$300 lower simply because theirs
is elastic, and they outbid us any-
way."
A source high in the administra-
tion pointed out that the Ivy
League has a built-in advantage,
since their tuition is higher. When
they offer a'$2000-a-year scholar-
ship it automatically sounds better
to the prospective athlete, even
though it may give him n1o more

Fast Carry-Out

"extra'" money than one of the
Big Ten Aid program scholarships.
The, Big Eight, on the other
hand, has no program, and no
limit to their offers.
"They have 'gotten many good
boys out of the Big Ten area,"
Crisler said, "especially from the
more western states such as Iowa
and Illinois."
It is a known fact that most
colleges depend on their alumni to
help direct promising athletes to
their "alma mater." "Our alumni
are very important," Perigo states,
"but they have the same, problem
that faces all of us. They have to
find boys that can pass our aca-
demic standards, and then they
have to out-talk other schools."
An anonymous alumnus from
Chicago complained recently that
finding prospects for Michigan is
almost impossible. "After we find
one," he said, "we have to con-
vince him that a huge offer from
Yale or some other school isn't
any better than ours."
Not Active -
Pete Tillotson, captain of 'this
year's squad, feels that Michigan's
basketball staff doesn't do enough
active recruiting.
"Perigo doesn't approach the
situation business-like as many
of the Conference coaches do,"
Tillotson stated. "He seems more
content to wait for the players
to come 'to him, wh~ile. other
schools carry on an active spring
recruiting campaign."
(The next article in the series will
discuss " the Michigan basketball
coaching situation.)

R No Swim Meet
Contrary to an announce-
ment in the Michigan Union
Calendar of events, there will
not be a swim meet here today'
aganist Indiana. The Wolver-
ine tankmen will not be in ac-
tion again until the NCAA
meet.

'I

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3OSTON M - Montreal Goalie
qgies Plante suffered a con-
sion and spinal .injury and
ton wing Jerry Toppazzini was
elined for the balance of the
son last night as the Bruins
tered the champion Canadiens,
Jhnny Aiken, Boston practice
lie for six years making his
fessional debut,' was the vic-
of all but one of the Bruins'
Is in the blood-soaked battle.
ronco Horvath got two goals
an assist and Vic Stasiuk
ee assists for the Bruins, whil
mate Johnny Bucyk registered
20th score.
lante is leading in the race for
Vezina trophy for allowing the
,est goals.
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C11PRTION
A Sub.hiar y of PLANTS AT AZUSA AND
The General Tire & Rubber Company NEAR SACRAMENTO. CALIFORNIA
An Aerojet-General representative 'will be
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