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March 14, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-03-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICMIGAN DAILY

)utlines Religious Role

-f k

3y NAN MARKEL
University of Michigan
hope to completely civilize
mts, but if it does so
it has accomplished some-
visiting theology profes-
yesterday.
zation," the Rev. Fr. John
Murray of Woodstock
Md., explained, "is a thin
ecause it is so flimsy, it
ilt to grasp.
vocated a university pro-
promote general under-
of religiousf'isth and
nding of the specific sys-
belief. "The university
spire to be messianic," he
uit it does have a com-'
to put an end to intel--
avagery or barbarism in
rms" '
Strays' from Topic
theology professor was
nominally on "A Roman
View of State University
,," but he strayed con-
7 from his topic in build-
o his-conclusion.
g into philosophical back-
he pointed out that\"All
alisms (multiple ideals) of
have shattered spheres of
e and possibilities for good
it. Under the surfaces, past
thought are still going on.
ill the clhshing truths, the
nds to get lost.

-Daly-Harold Gassenhemer,
Rev. Fr. John Courtney Murray,
... speaks on religion
"Modernity," the Jesuit con-
tinued as he made fast philosophi-
cal mileage, "has come to an end.
The philosophical problem is to
pass beyond modernity."
New Problems
Father Murray believes that
there are new problems which
"modernity" did not have to face.
Formerly, people believed that
pluralism was a good thing and
the more of it the better. Con-

structive movemepts today are
directed toward unity and order.
"Protestantism is no longer so
proud of its multiplicities," the
Catholic priest said, "and the
Catholic Church now emphasizes
'the true Church that is one."'"
The university is the creation
of modernity, he said. But many
people's commitments to modernity
and its many, and varied ideals
have given way now to a search
for unity and order. How does this
apply to a university?
Clarify Pluralism
Father Murray answered his
question by explaining, "The uni-
versity's task is to clarify modern
pluralisms, to make them intel-
ligible."
The task doesn't sound simple,
and it isn't. "Students," the priest
explained, "are forced to be scien-
tific naturalists In the classroom,
whatever else they may be, some-
what schizophrenically, outside the
University."
Canada House
To Sponsor
First Meeting
Maple Leaf Night, featuring
dancing and entertainment, will
be held at 8:30 p.m. today at the
International Center, according to
Allan Tweddle, '60E, president of
Canada House.
This is the first large meeting of
Canada House, a new Canadian
student organization which is hop-
ing to be recognized soon.
Tweddle announced that the
club will send a delegate to the
Model United Nations at the Union
tomorrow as one of its activities.
"Such a club has been needed
for a long time," Tweddle said, "to
facilitate Canadian employmgnt at
graduation time and to stimulate
interest in Canada through group;
activities in order to bring more
Canadian courses to the Univer-
sity.
The group hopes to contact the
17,000 Canadian Alumni in order
to create scholarships for study,
here.
Previously Canadians have visit-
ed the International Center only
to obtain I-20 forms which make
for easy travels across the border,
added Tweddle.

Co1umnist
To Present
Views Here
Washington columnist Doris
Fleeson will speak on "The Ameri-
can Search for Peace" at 3 p.m.
today in Auditorium A, Angell
Hall.
Mrs. Fleeson is the only woman
Washington correspondent whose
work appears regularly in the
large metropolitan dailies of the
country.
Her column, distributed five
days a week, is an interpretive
analysis of important political de-
velopments, particularly those in-
volving domestic politics.
She became interested in politics
while investigating municipal cor-
ruption as a general reporter for
the New York Daily News. After
tours at City Hall and the New
York legislature, she was sent to
Washington to help open a na-
tional news service for her paper.
During the war she was a maga-
zine correspondent in the North
African and European theatres.
After the war she returned to
Washington and began writing her
syndicated column.
She is a member and former
president of the Women's National
Press Club, and the recipient of
many awards and honorary de-
grees in her field.
IFC Petitions
Due Today
Petitions for the nine Inter-
fraternity chairmanships are due
at 5 p.m. today in the IFC office,
according to Lou Kolb, '59, IFC
executive vice-president-elect.
The offices include the chair-
manship of committees such as
Social, Fraternity Relations and
Greek Week,
The petitions must include a
statement of the applicant's quali-
fications and his ideas for im-
proving his particular committee,
Kolb explained.

Six Astronomers To Attend
General Meeting in Moscow

Six University astronomers and
several of their wives will attend
the 10th General Assembly of the
International Astronomical Union
to be held in Moscow this summer.
Prof. Leo Goldberg, chairman
of the astronomy department, is
chairman of the United States
delegation to the IAU. The other
five delegates from the Univer-
Registration
For Military
Test Begins
Men desiring to take the Selec-
tive Service College° Qualification
Test this year should register for
it immediately, according to Lt.
General Lewis B. Hershey, director
of selective service.
The test, which is used as a
guide in considering-requests for
deferment from military service
to continue studies, will be given
on May 1.
Application cards and instruc-
tional material may be picked up:
at local selective service boards
now. Applications must be post-
marked not later than midnight
Friday, April 11. Hershey urged all
men concerned to make early ap-
plication.
E. Jack Petoskey, of the office
of registration and records, em-
phasized the fact that all juniors
in pre-professional courses, such
as pre-medicine or pre-dentistry,
planning to complete their studies
must take the test this spring. No

sity are Prof. Fred T. Haddock,
Prof. Lawrence H. Aller, Prof.;Or-
ren C. Mohler, °Prof. William Lil-
ler, and Edith Muller, all of the
astronomy department.
At the IAU assembly, which will
be held from Aug. 13 to 20 at they
new University of Moscow, reports
will be given on the latest research
on some 40 topics, including ro-
tation of the earth, evolution of
the stars, astronomical observa-
tions from balloons and rockets
and satellites.
Organized in 1920, the IAU has
international assemblies about
every three years, and this year's
meeting will probably be its larg-
est, with 600 people attending as
guests of the USSR.<
Members will be able to visit
Leningrad and tour observa'tories
in the Crimea, Georgia and Cen-
tral Asia, and their expenses'after
their arrival will be paid by the
Russians. Non-members and
wives will pay $150.
Grants from the Rockefeller
Foundation, N a tion a l Science
Foundation, Office of Naval 'Re-
search and United States Air
Force, which is providing trans-
portation for 25 persons on Mili-
tary Air Transport Service, 'are
also supporting the 150 to 200
Americans attending the meetings
and separate institutions will sup-
nnrt their nwn nersnnnel

Campus

United Nations

Don't Forget:

*'

Saturday March 15

..

Sponsored

by The Union

E SLUMP:
ance Survey Shows
isumers' Confidence

SABBATH SERVICES

makeup
year.

tests will be given

this

(. -

sponsored by
PHI SIGMA DELTA FRATERNITY

American consumer facesr
.pressing worry over gen-
siness prospects across the
but displaying confidence
wn personal financial posi-1
Is the finding of the 13th
survey of Consumer Fi-
to be released in thisl
3Federal Reserve Bulletin.
vey was conducted in Jan-
nd February by. the Uni-'
Survey Research Center,~
ting with the Board of
ors of the Federal Reserve.
nal interviews of a cross-'
of the consumer popula-
ulted in a number of con-
Display Pessimism
[any consumers displayed
smU regarding business con-
during the coming year.
two-fifths of those inter-
expected "bad times" in
while approximately one-
oked for "good times.'
was the highest percentage
Imistic views expressed in
-evious cpnsumer finance
consumers viewed layoffs.
ork hours and reduced in-
is reasons for their predic-_
Little Personal Loss
hough forecasting poor na-
business prospects, nearly
ourths of those interviewed
d no personal financial
Only one-tenth expected
Ate of earning to decline.
e views were only slightly
orable than in other recent
relatively high percentage
umers-about one-fourth-
d that their rate of income
ver than it had been at this
st year. This was the largest
ion reporting an income
for any survey in recent
Earning More
te same time,' about 36 per
all interviewed said that
re earning more today than
ago. This was the lowest
age since 1950.
ans for the purchasing of
items appeared to be con-
with other years:'
thrly substantial decrease
ed in the field of new auto-
where 6.6 per cent of con-
planned to invest in a 1958
compared with the 8.5 per

cent who planned similar action1
last year.
There was, at the same time, a
similar increase in plans to ac-
quire used cars..
Plans to purchase new homes
were less frequent than last year,
but somewhat more frequent than
in 1954.'
A normal number of consumers
said they intended to maintain or
improve their present homes
through expenditure.
The consumer survey empha-
sized the data can serve only as
an index of consumer trends rather
than as a forecast for the coming
year.

'I

BIGGEST
\P- BELL
PARTY
OF THE YEAR
5 P.M. - TODAY

Tonight at 7:30

Zwerdling-Cohn Chapel

Speaker:

PROF. WILEUR C. NELSON

Chairman, De ft.. Aeraoaauticad Engineering,-
fATOMS, MORALS AND SATELLITES" - Scientific Viewpoint
B'n3i B'rith Hillel Foundation «. .. 142U. ill Street

maim

L-:.

UNIVERSITY LECTURE IN JOURNALISM
DORIS FLEESON
Washington Columnist
for United Features Syndicate
Public Cordially Invited to Hear Her Speak on
"The American Search For Peace"
Friday, March 14 Aud. A, Angell Hall
3 o'clock
This Advertisement paid for by University Press Club of Michigan

DIAL NO 2-3136
LAST T DAYS!
* * *
YEAR'S 10 BEST!I"
-Time Magazine,
Saturday Review
Sl-4

THE ZETA BETA TAU PLEDGE
Congratulates

CLASS

THE P1 LAMBDA PHI PLEDGE CLASS

on its pledge prank of stealing about half of their
house's silverwear.
We don't mean to disparage your prank, but
we do have a sugestion. Next time, it might be
worthwhile to check to see if the supper utensils
are still in the dishwasher.

I

I

MAGOO CARTOON

grad st.ptiksdyparty

1i

4 Shows Daily
12:00 Noon
3 - 6 and 9 P.M.

Mats. 90c
Eves. & Sun.
$1.25

A GALA ENTERTAINMENT EVENT!

r Go
ad inc

Fictic
Biogra
Poetr
Hum
Spor
Cook B
Art
Literat
Bibl
Children's

O4
phy
ry
or
ts
ooks
ure
es
Books f
CARDS
SR Y

MONTGOMERY
CLIFT
ELIZABETH
SAINT

M-G-M's
RAINTREE
COUNTY
in the great tradition
of Civil"War romance!

PATRICIA NEAL,
and HUGH MARLOWE
*
Saturday at 7:00 and 9:00
"THE DA :TEEAR
withWSTO OGILL

friday, march 14th
vfw hall 314 east liberty
90c person, dragorstag

"wearing of the

t

9 till I

entertainment featuring the psurfs
wear something. green - id.'s required
sponsored by graduate student council

*

dancing to Paul mcdonough's orchestra

_ _a a _a a a a _ aa_

NOW
Gal

DIAL
NO 8-6416

green'"

Gl Firstt

Anniversary Program!

the great Ella
MUSIC OF DIac

Fitzgerald sings

"
the're .''ts.

. .

*

*

THAT "GREEN MAN'! IS AT. IT AGAIN!

-RIGHT IN THE SLY '-' -- i p "HILARIOl
STYLE AT WHICH "C ..tt
BRITISH MOVIES ff{}. en
ARE SO EXPERT...
a combination of beha
amusing and alto. re

VS FUN
he most
trancing
hoolboy
vior and
atee of

IKE ELLINGION

ked by

MEETING
STAT I O

. __.. r...... ... ..... . ,e-.rr - rw r wti. at ;

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