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February 06, 1958 - Image 21

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-02-06

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5

)AY, FEBrITARY 6, 10"
LIST CANDIDATE:
rman Thomas To Sneak in Rackham

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'U' Press To Print History of World

U

Orman Thomas, six-time can-
dte for the presidency of the
ted States on the Socialist
et, will speak at 8 p.m. tomor-
in Rackham Hall on "Arms
the Economy."
he Economics Club is sponsor-,
the program. Saturday Thomas
address the Political Issues
b. The location of this talk
Ibe announced today.
riday night's talk is open to
public free of charge. On
urday afternoon, however, at-
dence is restricted to members
y, though membership in the
anization may be purchased at
door.
Father of Five
eventy-three year old Thomas,
tier of five, received his- AB de-
e from Princeton in 1905, and
s ordained a Presbyterian min-
r, six years later. He was the
tor of an East Harlem parish.
Chomas' career as a columnist,
hor and political figure began
1918 when he became the
.nder and editor of "The World
morrow." Since then he has
n associate editor of "The Na-
n," Chairman of the Postwar
rld Council, director of the
ague for Industrial Democracy
d columnist for the Mirror
terprises, Los Angeles.
[homas has written many widely
d and often quoted books, in-
ding "The Conscientious Ob-
tor in America," "As I See It,"
ppeal to the Nations" and "A
cialist's Faith."
Many Parties
rhomas is known best for his
litical work. During his life he
,s been a Republican, Progres-
e, Democrat but most notably
Socialist. He has been very se-
re in his criticism of the two
jor parties whom he says fail
make distinction between them-
ves on great national issues.
He is an advocate of pacificism,
>or unions and the socialization
natural resources and mono-
lies. These beliefs have beenj
lled to public notice through his
adership in the Socialist party

After a record publishing year
in 1957, the University Press plans
to highlight 1958 by releasing the
first four volumes of the Univer-
sity of Michigan History of the
Modern World.
Following a trend which showed
increases in history titles pub-
lished last year, the new series
will contain 15 or 16 volumes
when completed, according to
Edwin Watkins, assistant director
of the Press.
The books will cover all major
countries and powers of the last
three centuries, he said, and will
be "modern history written not
for historians, but for the gener-
al reader."
Books Listed
The first four to be released
next fall will include Russia{ by
W. B. Walsh; The Near East, by
William Yale; The Far East, by
Nathaniel Peffer; and Latin
America, by J. Fred Rippy.
The first book to be released in
1958 is The Successful Camp, by
Lewis C. Reiman. Others sched-
uled for spring publication include
all varieties from "Free Society
and Moral Crisis," by Robert C.
Angell, to the Mushroom Hunter's
Field Guide, by Alexander H.
Smith.
The Press will also continue the
Ann Arbor Science Library, a
series of scientific volumes of gen-
eral interest which was started in
1957, and the inexpensive Ann
Arbor Paperback editions.
Spring Releases Given
Spring releases in the science
series will include "Light," by Ed-
uard R u e c h a r d t, and "The
Senses," by Wolfgang Von Bud-,
denbrock. Fall releases in this
group will be "The Birds," by Os-
kar Heinroth, and "Ebb and Flow:
The Tides of Earth, Air and
Water." by Albert Defant.
Additions to the paperback
books, which were solidly estab-
lished during 1957, will be two
volumes on the world and the uni-
verse by Sir Arthur Eddington,
and "Shakespeare at Work", by G.
B. - Harrison; "Six Theosophic
Points," by Jacob Boehme; and
"Thomas More," by R. W. Cham-
bers.
Five more paperbacks will be
released during the fall season.
Also continuing a precedent set
in 1957, the University Press will
release more new translations of
classics, in addition to trade and
text books, music scores, and
books of general interest.

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SOCIALIST TO SPEAK-Norman 'Thomas, one of the nation's
leading Socialists, will be at the University tomorrow night to
address the Economics Club. The meeting is open to the public.
Thomas, one of the most controversial figures in American
politics, believes there is little difference in the two major parties
in the country.

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FIRST FOR 1958-"The Sucessful Camp," by Lewis C. Reimann,,
heads the list of spring releases of the University Press. Last year
the Press published a record of 52 titles, ranking with three other
collegiate publishing houses in the country.

on whose ticket he ran for presi-
dent every election year from 1928
through 1948.
Need Sharp Distinction
Sharp distinction he says must
be made between Socialism and
Communism. Thomas is violent
anti-Communist.
Long term rather than immedi-
ate gains are the objectives of

this seldom agreed with though
universally admired campaigner.
Ironically enough, though the
total number of votes he received
in 1948 dropped 750,000 from his
first attempt at the presidency in
1928, most of the measures on his
platform have been accepted by
Democrats with conflicting pol-
icies.

New Reactor
ro Provide
Great Potential
Within two or three generations,
the atomic "breeder" reactor now
under construction near Monroe
will compete economically with
conventional powre plants, Robert
W. Hartwell, its general manager,
said recently at the University.
Hartwell described the plant as
"the safest reactor that will ever
be built" in a talk, at the 11th
annual Michigan Rural Health
Conference. A University alumnus,
he is general manager and a de-
signer of the Power Reactor De-
velopment Co., builders of the
Enrico Fermi Atomic Power Plant.
Speaking on the financial as-
pects of the reactor, he said:
"I have never known a field
except perhaps rockets and mis-
siles that has cost larger sums of
money.
That's why Dow 'Chemical Co.
and Detroit Edison banded to-
gether to produce this power plant.
Many other manufacturers and
utilities from Michigan and other
states have donated their man-
power, money and management
know-how in the six and one half
or seven years that we have
studied the breeder reactor.
"These companies do not even
recover the financial support they
pour into the project, because any
excess from the sale of' power will
be turned over to research and
development, probably to univer-
sities.
For the present, all plutonium
produced will go to a government
stockpile for weapons materials,
but the sale of both power and
plutonium makes this reactor an
extremely attractive economic po-
tential.

SPEAKS AT 'U':
Commissioner Lists Four
Major State Health Needs

Continuing and expanding they
state's use of polio vaccine is one
of four major immediate public
health needs in Michigan, State
Health Commissioner Dr. Albert E.
Heustis said recently in an address
at the University.
Other needs he cited are ex-
panded work with nursing homes
and homes for the aged, legisla-
tion against radiation dangers and
air pollution, and state aid for
local health departments.
Reporting that the attack rate
of paralytic polio has dropped
from 1,127 in 1953 to 119 last
year, Dr. Heustis urged that gov-
ernment participation in giving
polio shots be placed on the same
continuing basis used in other im-
munization programs.
If the established pattern is
followed, he said, the state should
budget $295,000 for next year-
enough to buy vaccine for nearly
all of 200,000 babies who will reach
the age for immunization.
Despite gains against polio, he
declared, many other disabling
and long-term diseases continue
to take a high toll, "Often need-
lessly penalizing folks just because
tbey are old, sick. or both."
He called for expanded work
with nursing homes and homes for
the aged, together with launching
of more community bedside nurs-
ing and home care services.
Radiation dangers and air pollu-
tion comprise a newer set of health
hazards which can be met more
effectively if the State Health De-
partment is given specific legisla-
tive authorization for its investi-

gations and work in these fields,
he continued.
His: department is seeking state
aid increase from the present total
of $355,000 to $750,000-about 10
cents per capita. "Based on what
we see, realistic state participation!
in health, just as in education, is
acutely needed to stimulate a rea-
sonable level of public health pro-
tection in many areas."
He declared that "Many com-
munity groups might be in for
quite a shock of they took a real
close look at the standing of serv-
ices such as well child supervision,
home nursing care, immunization
or sanitation safeguards in their
own backyards.

Home Cause
Of Accidents
A man's home may be his castle,
but it can also be his guillotine.
This warning vas presented re-
cently by Dr. Robert H. Trimby of
the Ingham County Medical Soci-
ety at the 11th annual Michigan
Rural Health Conference at The
University.
Dr. Trimby pointed out that
home accidents are now the chief
cause of death of children under
the age of five years in the United
States.

A record 52 titles were published
by the University Press in 1957,
which ranked it with three other
collegiate publishing houses in the
country. Yale University, Columh-
bia University, and the University
of Chicago also printed between
50 and 100 volumes during the
year, as did 31 other publishers.
University of Michigan releases
Suburbs Face
ealt Danger
"The greatest single danger to
rapidly growing suburban com-
munities today is the lack of ade-
quate planning," John R. Snell,
senior partner of the consulting
engineering firm of Michigan
Associates, Lansing, told the 11th
Michigan Rural Health Confer-
ence here recently.
"The reason most of the larger
cities are in the mess they are to-
day is because they did not have
satisfactory community planning
when they were townships or,
small cities," Snell said.
"Suburbs are growing every-
where like Topsy and, with lack
of planning, are often taking on
the appearance of ugly, awkward
children destined to grow into
ugly, awkward and unhealthy
men.

followed a national trend of both
profit and non-profit presses,
which resulted in increases of
titles in the fields of science, busi-
ness, education, games and sports,
and history, where the largest
proportional increase was regis-
tered. The number of fiction titles
published decreased.
On the whole, 1957 was a rec-
ord year, publishing the second
highest number of titles of the
century following a decrease in
1956.
Michigan 35th
In Doctor Ratio
Michigan ranks 35th among the
48 states in the ratio of private
p hysicians to its population,the
Michigan Rural Health Confer-
ence learned recently.
Dr. R. W. Spaulding, chairman
of the doctor placement commit-
tee, Michigan Health Council, saii
the state has one practicing phy-
sician for every 1,218 residents.

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STORE HOURS
r Daily 9 to 5:30
Winter Shoe Sale
TAYLOR-MATRIX -ALLEN EDMONDS
CORDOVANS. The most popular leather of the current season.
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BORHIDE SHOES of the finest quality. Regularly priced at
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HEATHER GRAINS in the latest maple tan shade. Reduced from
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THE CHALLENGE Current projects at
UCRL are at the very frontier of nuclear
research. Assignments are fresh and stim-
ulating at all levels. Here one calls upon
his creative imagination - as well as his
ability-to help solve fundamental prob-
lems in nuclear science.
ASSOCIATES Men noted for outstand-
ing accomplishments in your field are on the
UCRL staff. Many of them have contrib-
uted pioneer achievements in the nuclear
field. You share their pioneering knowledge
-and have their encouragement-at UCRL.

digital computers, water boiler reactors,
particle accelerators, to facilities in nu-
clear magnetic resonance-electron spin
resonance.
ATMOSPHERE UCRL is directed by sci-
entists and engineers. Here you'll find the
right "climate" for work and advancement,
encouragement for initiative. And you'll
enjoy the opportunity to work in the San
Francisco Bay .Area.
} 0 0
A UCAtL staff' member will visit your campus
MONDAY FERB 24

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