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March 08, 1958 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-03-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TIE MICHIGANDAILY

fic Gains To Affect Law

C. Jessup, Hamilton Fish
of International Law
[omacyat Columbia Uni-
discussed yesterday pro-
:ientific development and
t on world peace and in-
ial law.
break-throughs h fore-
re: 1) unlimited power
the fusion of hydrogen,
is power to purify;" 2) un-
amounts of water from
3) weather control, and
'fective oral contraceptive.
ortance for the world's
-n control."
e four developments came
"They could provide
f r'elieving vast new areas
ment, and could provide
>f relieving some of the
s which now find their
n domination and expan-
scusses Space Law
nternational law profes-
a look into the next two
ajor areas of his field to
d - space law and claims
ns on the Antarctic con-
ring to space law, he ex-
'the United States has no
y: this means interna-
greement will be neces-
e. suggested that the U.N.
be the logical medium
which to settle these
s. "It would be wrong to
that Russia will be deaf
sals based on this frame-
organizations are aware
eed for space law, he said.
I Bulganin :usually men-
ni their letters."
[iscussion Limited
cost discussion is limited
ed knowledge. Past legal
ies started with existing
Lonal conventions regard-
pace and bogged down in,
n of the distance up-
which state sovereignty
Much of the discussion

'U' PROFESSOR:
Uhlenbeck Well-Known
For Work in Physics

'LINEAR IMAGERY':
'U' Museum To Feature Garbutt's Art

Prof, Jack Garbutt's "Rackhan

ri

-Daily--George Keefer
LAWYER INTERNATIONALE--Philip C. Jessup, Hamilton Fish
Professor of International Law and Diplomacy at Columbia Uni-
versity, delivered the last of a series of five lectures yesterday.
Jessup, speaking on "Problems and Prospects" of international law
spoke to approximately 200. students and faculty members.

It'sa long way from Indonesia
to the University, especially if one
arrives by way of the Netherlands.
But Prof. George Uhlenbeck,
author, internationally - known
theoretical physicist and radia-
tion expert, has followed precise-
ly that course in his adventures.
Prof. Uhlenbeck is the co-dis-
coverer of the complicated con-
cept of the spin of the electron,
now an accepted part of the atom-
ic theory. For work in this field,
he was a co-winner of the Nation-
al Research Corporation Award
in 1954.
Honored by Government
Among a number of other
various awards, the professor has
been honored by the University
and the national government.
In 1956, the University named
him the official Henry Smith Car-
hart Professor of Physics, a dis-
tinctive award established in 1947
in honor of former outstanding
faculty members.
A Certificate of Merit from the
United States government was ac-
corded Prof. Uhlenbeck in 1948
for his service as leader of the
theoretical section of the radia-
tion laboratory at Massachusetts
Institute of Technology.
Prof. Uhlenbeck is also listed in
several of the standard biographi-
cal reference volumes, including
"Who's Who in America" and
"Wie Is Dat" (the Dutch version
of the book).
Writes Articles
In the role of author, Prof. Uhl-.
enbeck has written approximately
50 articles on various phases of

.

Grant Drawings and Paintings"
will be the first of three exhibitions
highlighting the reopening of the
University Museum of Art galleries
in the Alumni Memorial Hall
Monday.
Other exhibits will be: "Good
Design in Switzerland," which will
remain through March 30, and
"Loans form the Cranbrook, De-
troit, and Toledo Museums, and
New Accessions," which will re-
main in the West Gallery until
mid-June.
Prof. Garbutt is on the faculty

of the architecture school. His ex-
hibit is the, result of a Rackham
faculty research grant.
Through the grant, Prof. Gar-°
butt was able to travel to north-

east Utah, where he made over 100 1956 on the shore of Lake Superior.
drawings of rock and wood in its Agates and driftwood were my
natural state of growth and decay. main source of concentration.
His project, which was -self-as- There followed a fascination with
signed, was undertaken "to de- all kinds of line."
velop linear imagination in paint- Prof. Garbutt's work will be
ing that will contain patterns of shown in the South Gallery
line derived from unusual wood through April 8
and rock formations in nature The exhibition will include ten
and to suggest the vast hidden oils on canvas and 29 drawings.

I

Come.

to Church

forces tiat have created thf
patterns,
"I stumbled onto this idea,"
explains, "through a series
paintings done in the summer

Is tangled in a web of endless dis-
armament talks, he said.
He observed that the miscalcu-
lations of Soviet science and tech
nology on the part of the United
States "led us to wrong decisions
concerning the use to be made of
the new scientific achievements in
nuclear physics.
The essential unity of scientific
thought and progress, and the in-
terdependence of science is well-
evidenced by' our own reliance on
the scientific achievements of the
men of many nations.
"In terms of stark realism it
makes no sense for the two great-
est powers to frame their policies
on the basis of "day to day scien-
tific preeminence in any particu-
lar field," he continued.
"Bath nations still have the
capacity for mutual annihilation."
Race Will Continue
Until some fundamental change
and adjustment, both will con-
tinue the weapons race, he went

on. "There is no argument to sug-
gest that one will ever submit to
the other."
Regarding settling of present
and future claims on the Antarc-
tic, Jessup noted past history:
Russia, he said, stated in 1950
that settlement of the area was
a matter for U.N. control. Britain
took Chile and Argentina to~world
court on a territorial claim, but
the two countries refused to abide
by the court's jurisdiction. The
United States has made no claims
and refuses to recognize claims
of any other countries.
RWcognizes Value
He recognized potential value
of the frigid region: "Fusion
power would make Antarctic
metals more valuable than Az-
tee gold was in the 16th century."
At present, he declared, all
claims have been held up until
after the International Geophysi-
cal Year program, and scientists
are pressing for a further holdup
of claims toextend their programs
beyond IGY.
Approaching the end of his lec-
ture, Jessup referred to the open
attitude of the international law-
yer dealing 'With these problems,
born of science developments:
"The time tables are subject to
change without notice, but the
political scientists and lawyers
would be well advised to start the
Journey to an area with aspects
and problems quite different from
those with which we are now try-
ing rather vainly to cope."

-Daily-Norman Jacobs
PROF. GEORGE UHLENBECK
... physicist
atomic and nuclear physics and
plans a forthcoming book con-
cerning statistical mechanics.
A native of Indonesia, he re-
ceived his education in Holland.
Prof. Uhlenbeck first came to the
United States in 1927 where he
became an associate professor in
1930.
A trip to Princeton next year
will provide Prof. Uhlenbeck with
more time to devote on his book
concerning statistical mechanics
which, he says will take "some
time to finish."
He plans to return to the Uni-
versity in about a year.

Sunday

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCHt
502 East Huron
Dr. Chester H. Loucks and the Rev Hugh
.Pickett, Ministers 1
Mrs. BethMahone, Assistant Student
Counselor
9:45 A.M. Student Class will study, "What We
Can Believe About the 'State'."
1 1:00 A.M. Morning Worship, Rev. Hugh Pickett
preaches on, 'The Mask of Mercy."
6:45 Members of Roger Williams Fellowship will
meet at the Guild House to hear Miss Barbara
Black talk on "My Summer Service experiences
in Egypt."
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw at Berkshire
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M. Adult Group, Speaker: Dr. B. K. Bag-
chi.on "Electro-physiological Aspects of Yogic
Practices."
11:00. A.M. Sermonby Rev. Edward H. Redman:
"The Place of the Prophets."
Sunday afternoon: Student joint meeting with
Wayne and Michigan State at Detroit.

Il Orgamzation Notices

PRESBYTERIAN STUDENT CENTER
at the FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
Rev. William S. Baker, Campus Minister
Miss Patricia Pickett, Assistant
Sunday-
Church Worship Service, 9:00 A.M., 10:30
A.M., 12:00.
10:30 A.M. Seminar on "Basic Christian Be-
liefs.
11:30 A.M. Coffee Hour.
5:45 P.M. Snack Supper.
7:00 P.M. Debate: Only Non-Church Voca-
tions are Christian.
Tuesday, 9:45 P.M. Introduction to Bible Study.
Tuesday, 9:00-1,1 :00 Open House at Pat Pickett's
apartment, 217 South Observatory.
Wednesday, 4:15 P.M. Book Review: "The Fall"
by Camus.
Wednesday, 7:30 P.M. Lenten Worship.
Thursday, 8:30 P.M. Drama Reading Group.
Friday, 5:00 Leave for WSF Retreat.
Friday, \6:15 P.M. Graduate Group Supper and
Discussion, "Ideas in Religion and Science"
by Professor Kenneth Gordon.
ST NICHOLAS' ORTH6DOX CHURCH
414 N. Main St.
Rev. Fr. Andrew Missiras, Pastor
Saturday Evening-Vespers 8:00 P.M.
Sunday Services-Matins 9:30 A.M.
Divine Liturgy (in Greek) 10:30 A.M. to 12 noon.

up Attacks Use of Force
us International Laws

(Use of this column for announce-
ments of meetings is available to of-
ficially recognized and registered stu-
dent organizations only.)
Southeast Asia Delegation Seminar,
March 8, 1 p.m., Friends Center, 1416
Hill. Speaker: Prof. Russell Fifield of
the Pal. Set. Dept., "Politics in South-
east Asia." All interested persons wel-
come.
Hillel, March 8, dance by candlelight,
10-1 2.m., Social Hall. March 9, supper
club; 6 p.m.; lecture, 7 p.m., Brasley
Lounge. Some twentieth century novels
by American Jews, Part nI, Dr. Sey-
mour Yellin: "An End to Dying," by
Sam Astrachan.
* s "

Philip C. Jessup, lectur-
re students in EIutchins
berday, discussed shifts in
it of international law.
respect to observance of
onal laws, i Jessup ex-
bhat the most powerful of
r members of the "inter-
community" are not set-
good example for the
members.
ically backtracking to 11-
bis point, he cited the
3ritish invasion of the'
nal in 1956. "This would
en justifiable under in-
ial law in the 19th cen-

tury," he said. "But the mores
have changed, and some coun-
tries can't defy the new standards
confirmed in their solemn treaty
obligations.
Fobrc. .,cannot be used except
in self-defense or to support the'
United Nations."
Ending the lecture, Jessup ob-
served that most "political real-
ists agree that international an-
archy should be brought under
control. "Where does the balance
of advantage lie in terms of the
national interest? With the free-
dom of anarchy or - With submis-
sion to law?"

Sociedad Hispanica, March 10, 7:30
p.m., Basement, Lane Hall. Lecture:
"Flamenco Music," Mr. Solinis-Herrero;
slides of Mexico, Miss Betsy Burke.
Refreshments and dancing.
Michigan Christian Fellowship, lec-
ture, March 9, 4 p.m., Lane Hall.
Speaker: Rev. Leonard Verduin, "Why
Hast Thou Forsaken Me?"
* * *
Undergraduate Mathematics Club,
meeting, March 10. 7 p.m., 3201 An-
gell Hall. Speaker: Prof Goldman..
Unitarian Student -.Group, Tri-U
meeting, March 9. Meet at First Uni-
taria~n Church ,at 1 p.m. ,to go to meet-
ing with Michigan State and Wayne
State at betroit. Speaket: Dr. Mass, so-
ciologist, "Should Partisan Viewpoints
Be Ta'ught in the University Class-
room?"

Graduate Outing Club, hiking,
9, 2 p.m., meeting in back of
ham (N.W.)

March
Rack-

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FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Merril R. Abbey, L. Burlin Main, William B.
Hutchison, Eugene A. Ransom, ministers.
9:30 A.M. Discussion group: "What Methodists
Believe."
9:00 and 11:00 A.M. Worship. Topic: The Kind
of Certainty God Gives, by Dr. Merril R.
Abbey.
5:30 P.M. Fellowship Supper.
.6:45 P.M. Worship and Program. "Jesus' Teach-
ings on the Kingdom of God," L. Burlin Main,
speaker.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister.
9:45 A.M. Church School.
10:45 A.M.i Sermon: "Harbingers of the King-
dom.",
THE CONGREGATIONALS AND DISCIPLES
STUDENT GUILD
524 Thompson Street
J.2Edgar Edwards, Director
Donna Hamilton, Associate
Sunday, 9:30 A.M. Bible Study at Guild House.
Sunday, 7:00 P.M. The Student Guild will meet
in the-church parlor. Rosa Page 'Welch, the
Marian Anderson of the disciples and a world
famous singer and international ambassador
of good will, will be our guest.
Tuesday, 4:30-6:00 Coffee Break.
Friday, 12:00 noon, Luncheon series on Lent.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill at S. Forest
Rev. H. 0. YKder, Pastor
Gerald Kissell, Intern
Sunday-
9:00 & 11:00 A.M. Worship Services.
10:00 A.M. Bible Study.
6:00 P.M. Supper.
7:00 P.M. Lutheran World Federation As-
sembly Film.
Tuesday, 7:15 P.M. Course: "Christ and Culture."
Wednesday; 7:15 P.M. Lenten Service.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister
Junior Church worship, Douglas Chapel 10:45
A.M.
CHURCH SCHOOL for ALL AGES at 10:45.
"RESPECTABLE BRAIN-WASHING"-Dr. Fred E.
Luchs preaching at 10:45
STUDENT GUILD: 7:00 at Memorial Christian
Church. Presentation by Rosa Page Welch, in-
ternational "ambassador" of good will and
famous singer.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
10:00 A.M. Meeting for Worship.
10:00 A.M. Sunday School.
11:30 A.M. Meeting for Worship
11:30 A.M. Adult Study Class.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reforrr ed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. NO 5-2665; Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 Morning Service.
7:00 Evening Service.

If

this

BETH LEH EM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Herbert R. Lowe, Student Assistant Pastor
Paul R. Eberts, Minister td Students
9:45 A.M. Coffee Hour.
10:45 A.M. A concert by,.-the Elmhurst College
Chapel Choir.
7:00 P.M. Discussion Group.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Paul V. Matheson, Assistant
Sunlay Masses: 8:00 9:30, 11:00 A.M. end
12:00 noon.
Weekday 'Masses: 6:30, 7:00, 8:00 and 9:00
A.M.
Novena Devotions: Wednesday evening, 7:30 P.M.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 P.M.
Classes each evening in Christian Doctrine, Apolo.
getics, Church History, Scholastic Philosophy,
in the Father Richard Center.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST,
W. Stadium at Edgewood
L. C. Utley, Minister
SUNDAYS: 10:00, 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.;
WEDNESDAYS: 7:30 P.M.
Television: Sundays 2:30 P.M., Channel 6,
Lansing.
Radio: Sundays 5:30 P.M. WXYZ 1270
For transportation to services Dial NO 3-8273.
CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1131, Church St.
Dr. E. H. Palmer, Minister
10:30 Sermon, "Christ's Sacraments. 4ll Infant
Baptism."
7:00 P.M. Evening Worship Service. "The- See.
and Coming of Christ."
THE THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY
IN ANN ARBOR
106 East Liberty, 2ND FLOOR
Public Discussion, Wednesday, 8:00 P.M.
Listen to Radio Theosophy, Sundays, 12:15 P.M.
WPAG (1050 kc) . ;
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State & Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor
8:45 and 11:00 Morning Worship Services.
Sermon, "The Shadow of the Cross."
10:00 Sunday School.
5:45 Student Guild.
7:00 Evening Service, Sermon, "Christ is the
Lord of All."
**,7,15 n A

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. Sunday Morning Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday, Testimonial Service.
A free readting room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street. Reading room hours are: Mon-
day 11:00 A.M. to 8:30 P.M. Tuesday - Sat-
urday 11:00 A.M. to 5 P.M. Sunday 2:30 to
4:30 P.M.

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