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March 02, 1958 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-03-02
Note:
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Sunday, March 2, 1958

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY MAGAZINE

Sunday, March 2, 1958

THE MICHIGAN DAILY MAGAZINE

a.

CONTENTS,
'WINTER'S TALE Thomas Blues Page 2
THE MUSIC REVIEWER David Kessel Page 4
OUR GENERATION Dorald A. Yates Page 5
ARCHITECTURE Bernard Stollman Page 6
WHIZZ KIDS Michael Kraft Page 8
THE CAO DAI Richard Halloran Page 9
APARTMENT Vernon Nahrgang Page 10
RUMANIA TODAY __ Carol Prins Page 11
MARTY_'Ronald Kotulak Page 12
A WOMAN PRESIDENT? Rose Perlberg Page 13
THACKERAY -Vernon Nahrgang Page 14
PAPERBACKS ________Donald A. Yates Page 15
MAGAZINE EDITOR: Carol Prins
PICTURE CREDITS-Cover: Photo of Mary Frances Greshcke by Bruce
Bailey; Page 3: Daily photograph by Norman Jacobs; Page 4:
Sketches by Robert Snyder; Page 5: Daily photograph by Norman
Jacobs; Page 8: Daily photographs by Bruce Bailey and Paul Nida;
Page 9: Map drawn by Robert Snyder and photograph courtesy of
the Vietnamese Embassy;' Page 1 1 : Photograph courtesy of Ru-
mania Today published by the Agerpres News Agency; Page 12:
Daily photograph by James MacKay; Page 14: Pen sketch cour-
tesy of the McGraw-Hill Publishing Co.; Page 15: Daily photo by
Fred Merrill.

The Prevalence of Paperb
A Cultural Sign of Our Tines

'Winter 's

Tale':

By THOMAS BLUES
Daily Associate Personnel Director
A FORMER University of Mich-
igan philosophy instructor
turned disc jockey has written
and recorded a group of songs at-
tacking almost everything from
George Berkeley to Orval Faubus.
"I got fed up with my disserta-
tion," is Paul Winter's simple rea-
son for deserting his PhD studies
in 1950 and getting an announc-
ing job with University radio sta-
tion WUOM. Later he started
working for Detroit's WXYZ,

from which his noontime show, I cially acceptable manner. The rew

"Curtain Calls," emanates.
His songs, recorded last Novem-
ber on the only record that comes
in a "grey flannel jacket" are a
culmination of years of satirical
song writing under the title, A
Winter's Tale. The oldest song in
the album, "George Berkeley,"
was written in 1942, immediately
following his Philosophy 34 final,
which he later taught.
"I COMPLETELY botched the
part on Berkeley so I decided
to vent my aggressions in a so-

I

sult was a tune which proceeds tO
cut Berkeley down in a few short
verses.
"Please, pardon my becoming
lyrical
To sing in terms imperical
With elements satirical
Of Berkeley, George Berkeley."
The song finishes with:
"Now look here, to the termite
this match has infinite ex-
tension.
But to us mortals it has lesser
dimension.
What can it be this substance,
sometimes large sometimes
small?
You must have guessed by now
my friends, it is nothing at
all!"
In those days, he went by his
real name, Saul Wineman. He
gained his Masters Degree in
Philosophy, in spite of Berkeley,
in 1948 and taught Philosophy 34
recitations.
He recalls dismissing his classes
early during the 1948 presidential

Pick Gi Perfect Suit for Spring

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of financial success with a mini-
mum of concern over what the+
book in question does in the hard-
back form.
SOME PAPERBACK publishers
have become completely inde-
pendent and bargain competitively
in the open market for the original
material of writers. One firm
offers $3,000 for original short
novels. And an advance of $1,500
to the author of a paperback
original is commonplace today.
Accountable in great part for
the success of the paperbacks is
the fact that they satisfy a na-
tional need. America is a relatively
literate nation. True, we are be-
hind Belgium, Holland, Germany,
the Scandinavian countries and
others in degree of literacy; but
those of us who have learned to
read make an almost constant and
active use of the talent.
The place of the paperbacked
book on the campus is somewhat
distinct. The college student buys
more serious, scholarly titles than
the average paperback buyer; but
he reads less of those he buys
thian does the common reader who
almost religiously reads everything
that he purchases. The use of
paperbound books in classes points
up one of the most admirable uses
of the cheaply-bound volume. The
conscientious student can come
out of college with a handsome
and meaningful library acquired
at a cost that would have been
unapproachable ten years ago.
HERE IS AN example of what
a literary-minded bookshop
browser could pick up today: a
copy of the late Erich Auerbach';
excellent Mimesis, subtitled The
Representation of Reality in West-
ern Literature. The book, origi-
nally published in 1953, is to be
had today as a title in Doubleday's
Anchor Book series for $1.45.
A specialist would find Hispano-
phile Gerald Brenan's worthy vol-
ume, The Literature of the Span-
ish People on the list of Meredian
Books. Originally published in
1951, it is sold today for $1.95.
A student of American literature
could add the following books to
his library at a minimum of cost:
The Modern Novel in America by
Frederic J. Hoffman, listed among
Regnery's Gateway Books, sells for
$1.25; and representative of the
books that make their original ap-
pearance in paperback form is. an-
other Doubleday Anchor Book,
Richard Chase's The American
Novel and its Tradition, $1.25.

. .. IVY

WASH-TROL

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This same browser, in the
ence of the increasing num
paperback racks at his boot
would be able to confirm tl
observation to be made her
market is still growing and
day the paperbacks are incrE
It would appear safe to sa:
are here to stay for some
until something ingenious
vised that will eclipse thei
mendous simple and direct a
For the student population 1
ularly there's unmistakable

ASS

S A ' 1221

By DONALD A. YATES
' HE PAPERBOUND book, a rel-
atively recent innovation in
publishing, is rapidly becoming a
cultural sign of our times. From
the point of view of the reader,
the inexpensive paperback is a
boon. From the publisher's stand-
point, it could be regarded as a
form of suicide. However, to judge
from the large number of front-
line publishers who have cleared
out the spare office, picked up an-
other editor and jumped into the
paperback trade, it is a healthy
sort of suicide.
It is undeniable that the im-
plied promise of a cheap edition
to follow within months of the
original hardback edition of any
given title will.have a depressant
effect ors that book's sale in the
initial three-dollar bracket. Yet
this is not so serious a problem as
one might think. On the contrary,
as we shall-see, the paperback
sales are giving life to many a
hardbacked book.
The paperback serves as a great)

stimulant to reading. We suspect
that it is winning over a new
audience as well as gratifying the
mass of inveterate book-readers.
Comic book sales are on a decline,
noticeably so. It does not seem
unreasonable to think those read-
ers who were not lost to television
have moved on up the line to a
type of printed material made
available in paperbacked form.
Publishers have observed that
the paperback audience is so large
and responsive that it can virtually
guarantee a financial success for a
book which, in hardback edition
alone, would not have made
money. So it is that many hard-
back books are making print on
the basis of the earnings envisioned
in the subsequent inexpensive edi-
tion. In fact, it is not uncommon
today for an author to get his
contract with a publisher only
after a fixed agreement has been
made between the publisher and
a paperback editor regarding the
reprint rights. In this fashion, the
publisher establishes a guarantee

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EX-PHILOSOPHY STUDENT
to disc jockey
campaign to go out on The Diag
and argue with leftist Henry Wal-
lace sympathizers.
His humorous retaliation to
Berkeley is a far cry from a song
that he dashed off last fall dur-
ing the Little Rock integration
crisis, "The Ballad, of Orval
Faubus." An excerpt from the
tune succinctly illustrates his at-
titude toward racial hypocrisy.
"He figures that democracy is
civil and its right,
As long as it is Faubus, free and
white!"
HIS SONGS are for the most
part bitter satire with an oc-
casional show tune thrown in.
"I've been compared to Tom
Lehrer," Winter says, "and the
only two people who agree we
have nothing in common are
Lehrer and myself." Winter ex-
plains that Lehrer satirizes well
known and respected social insti-
tutions such as the Boy Scouts
and deer hunting. Winter's songs
are protests against society's cur-
rent phenomena - the organiza-
tion man and the reputed remedy
for "tired blood."
Winter. often. satirizes in his
songs his own profession, for in-
stance, one called the "DJ."
"Everybody loves the DJ, with
his happy, radio and TV per-
sonality,
The DJ, peddles Jukebox re-
ality.. .

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