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February 23, 1958 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-02-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rers

Bow

to

Wildcats,

Swimmers

Sink

MiS

MICHIGAN LOSES TO NU, 75-66:
Burton Registers 24 Points as Team Leader

M' Romps.67-30;
Hopkins Sets Marl
(Continued from Page 1)

(Continued from Page 1)

quickly, and it Was the Wildcats'
game from there on. The lead
opened to as much as 15 points,
at 69-54; and the NU cagers toyed
with the 'M' men for the last six
minutes.
Although both teams' play was
very ragged a good part of the
game, Northwestern came to life
with many fine team plays. Sharp
passing set up their baskets, by
shaking men free from the Wol-
verines' man-to-man defense.

1

Cold Again

In the shooting department,
Michigan had another cold' night,
while Northwestern had no trouble
finding the hoop. The Wildcats hit
32 out of 83 shots for a respectable
38.6 per cent, while Michigan could
only drop in 25 of 85 for an ex-
tremely poor 24.9 per cent.
-Burton was the only "M"' cager,
who was effective from the floor,
as he hit an amazing 9 out of 17
shots for better than 50 per cent.
Burton added six for six from the
free throw line to garner 24 points
and individual scoring honors.
The other Michigan men came
nowhere near Burton's pace. The

guards, who were often content
to shoot rather than work the ball
around, hit collectively for only
four points, and made but one of
21 shots from the floor.
Lee, who played both forward
and guard, took a fantastic total
of 24 of tha. team's 85 shots. This
could be understood during the
STANDINGS
W. L. Pet.
Michigan State....8 3 .727
Purdue , ..........7 4 .636
Iowa ..............6 4 .600-
Indiana...........6 4 .600
Northwestern ......6 5 .545
Ohio State .........7 6 .538
MICHIGAN ........4 6 .400
Illinois ............4 7 .364
Minnesota ......... 4 8' .333
Wisconsin .........3 8 .73
SCORES
Indiana 88, Ohio State 83
Purdue 88, Minnesota 79
Iowa 83, Illinois 79
Michigan State 93, Wisconsin
60
Northwestern 75, MICHIGAN
66

first half, when Lee was hot and
collected 14 points. However, in
the second half he cooled off and
ended the game making only a
third of his shots for 18 points.
. Pete Tillotson, usually a high
scorer for Michigan, was off in his
shooting, and could make only five
of 15 floor shots and three of
three from the foul line for 13
points.
Two Wildcats were mainly re-.
sponsible for the team's shooting
accuracy. Center Joe Ruklick, with
one of the finest hook shots seen
at Yost Field House in many
years, paced the team with 18
points and made eight of 17 from
the floor.
Wildcat Sparkplug
Campbell, the man who sparked
the Wildcats to their initial lead
and eventually to the victory,
added 16 points and made a phe-
nominal six out of 10 floor shots.
The only regular that didn't
score well for the Wildcats was
Willie Jones, the sometime flashy
sophomore who has proved quite
erratic so far this season. He was
able to get dnly three points.
The credit for Jones' poor show-

ing again goes to Burton, who
played a fabulous all-around game.
He paced the Wolverines in re-
bounds with 14, besides playing
the best offensive and defensive
game.
NU Rebounds Well
However, Lee and Tillotson
didn't grab their usual share of
the boards, getting only nine and G
eight respectively, and the Wild-
cats won that battle, too, 53-39.
Ruklick and Jones got 12 each,
while substitute forward Dick
Berry grabbed 11.
The Northwestern bench strength
was quite noticable, as Campbell
scored well and Berry hit a sizzl-
ing four for four shots besides
clearing the boards.
The only bright part of the'
Michigan showing besides Burton's
fine play was in the fouling and
free throw area. Michigan com-
mitted only 12-personal fouls, com-
pared to Northwestern's 17, and
hit on 16 of 20 free throws for a
neat 80 per cent.
Box Score

and neck with front - running
Tashnick for the rest of the way.
Both Tashnick aId Hopkins
sparkled throughout the meet. Be-
sides winning the individual med-
ley, Tashnick copped the 200-yd.
butterfly and swam on the win-
ning 400-yd. freestyle relay team.
In the 200-yd. butterfly, Tash-
nick set a new school and pool
mark as he swam the distance in
2:10.6 slashing two tenths of a
second off the previous mark set
by Tashnick earlier in the year.
Sensational Race
Hopkins posted another second
in the 200-yd. butterfly but swam
the most sensational race of the
meet whenhe set a new American
record in the 200-yd. breaststroke.
Hopkins trailed Michigan State's
Frank Modine for almost the en-
tire race,and it appeared that the
Spartan sophomore was headed:
for an easy victory when Hopkins
put on a tremendous spurt in the
final 25 yards to pass the startled
sophomore. It was Modipge's first
loss in fifteen dual meet races.
Diving followed the individual'
medley and Michigan began to
pull away as once again - they
finished 1-2. Acting Captain Dick,
Kimball put on his finest perform-
ance of the season as he easily
won the event. The star junior's
faultless performahce ijn several

GEORGE LEE
0. . scores two

MICHIGAN

Fl

i

Burton, ......... 9
Lee, f ............. 8
Tillotson, a ........ 5
Lewis, g ........... 1
Miller, g .......... 0
Wright, g......... 0
Tarrier, # ......... 2
Rogers, c .......... 0
Gaultieri, g. ...0
TOTALS.... ....25

G FT PF
6-6 2
2-2 2
S3-3 3
1-2 4
1-3 0
0-0 1
1-2 0
2-2 0
S0-0 0
16-20 12

TP
24
18
13
3
1
0
5
0i
66

--Daily-Paul Nida
ALVARO GAXIOLA
finishes second

of his dives, brought the crowd to
its feet. Alvaro Gaxiola finished a
close second in the diving with the
Spartan divers far behind.
The 100-yd. freestyle gave Mich-
igan another 1-2 combination by
Hanley and Woolley. In actuality
Don Patterson of MSU won the
meet but he was disqualified for
not touching the pool's end thus
Hanley was declared the -winner.
Michigan now held an almost
invincible lead of 22 points, 42-20.
Smith Outstanding
Another swimmer, backstrokes
John Smith deserves special men-
tion for his part in the meet. In
the 400-yd. medley relay in which
Michigan had been disqualified,
Smith easily beat State's Don
Nichols for their 100-yd. distance.
Smith, who had just returned to
school after a semester's absence
in Hawaii, was a question mark
before the start of the 200-yd.
backstroke. He soon answered the
question by easily outdistancing
the field and finishing first in a
creditable 2:15.4. Smith appeared
to have plenty left when he hit
the finish line.
In the last event of the day, the
400-yd. freestyle relay, the Michi-
gan team of Brian Browne, Tony
Tashnick, Carl Woolley and Dick
Hanley set a new pool record of
3:26.3 erasing the old mark of
3:32.4.
Statistics
MICHIGAN-MICHIGAN STATE4
400-YD. MEDLEY RELAY - 1.
State (Nichols, Modine, Harmon,
Fornell); Disqualified Mich. Time
--3:54.9.
220-YD. FREESTYLE--1. Hanley
(M); 2. Steuart (S);,3. Taylor (S).
Time-2:05.7.
50-YD. FREESTYLE-1. Woolley
(M); 2. Patterson (S); 3. Lowbaugh
(S). Time--:22.8.
200-YD. INDIVIDUAL MEDLEY-
1. Tashnik (M); 2. Hopkins (M); 3.
Dobler (S). Time-2:12.7.
tDIVING-i. Kimball (M); 2. Gax-
Iola (M); 3. Chadwick (S). Points.
272.05.
200-YD. BUTTERFLY-1. Tashnik;
(M); 2. Hopkins (M); 3., Harmon (S).
Tme-=2 :10.6 (New pool, school re).
ord); old record - 2:10.8-Tashnik
(M)-1958.
100-YD. FREESTYLE-1. Hanley
(M); 2. Woolley (M); 3. Dobler (S).
Time-:50.7.
200-YD. BACKSTROKE-1. Smith
(M); 2. Reissing (M); 3. Nichols (S).
Time--2:15.4.
440-YD. FREESTYLE-I. Steuart
(S); 2. Fries (M); 3. Lowbaugh (S).
Time 4 :39.9.
200-YD. BREASTSTROKE-1. Hop-
kins (M); 2. Modine (S); 3.- Maten
(M). Time--2:24.6 (New American
record for contemporary style).
.400-YD. FREESTYLE RELAY-I1.
Mich. (Browne, Tashnick, Woolley,
Hanley); 2. State. Time-3:26.3 (New
pool record) old record-3:32.4 -
Iowa-1958).

NO6THWESTERN FG
Warren, I ......... 5
Jones, f ......... 1
Rukluk, a ........ 8
Manti, g .....4
Johnson, g ........ 4
North, c .......... 0
Berry, I ......... 4
Campbell, g ....... 6
Greer, f ....... .0
TOTALS ........327
Halftime Score -
36, Michigan 27.

FT PF TP
2-3 3 12
1-3 5 3
2-2 3 18
1-2 3 9
0-0 1 8
0-0 0 0
1-1 2 9
4-5 0 16
0-0 0 0
11-16 17 75
Northwestern

HUMOR ON ICE:
Old Timers Stage Show

1

,";.

AFL-IO. Leaders
O.K Ae Layoffs
Read it in the Weekly
People for February 22
available at the Ann Ar-
bor Public Library and
the periodical room of
the University Library.
Library. Also on sale at
Marshall's Book Shop.

By STEVE SALZMAN
There were tall men, short men,
fat men, skinny men, and most
were balding.
They all took the ice yesterday
at the Coliseum, fgr; the annual
Old Timers hockey game.j
The Coliseum was virtually'
empty, and men like Bob Sehiller,
Neil Celley, Neil Buchanan, Bernie
Hanna, and Wally Maxwell 'were
not used to playing before so few
people.
Humorous dame
But they all gave it a try, and
the game was played with a lot.
of humor on both sides. Who Won?
Who knows, neither team ended up,
playing with the same nxen they
started with.
,Sitting in her" usual seat was
Joesphine Boardman, who' last
year won the "best fan of the

year" award from former Wol-
verine coach Vic Heyliger. She has
been to every Michigan game for
the past five years, and last year
she went with the team to Colo-
rado for the playoffs..
As she sat back in her seat and
relaxed words of wisdom poured
from her mouth about this year's
team. When slje was asked about
Friday night's encounter with
Minnesota an odd look came over
her face. She inferred it was prob-
ably the worst game the Wol-
verines played since she became a
regular fan.
Interesting Hobby
An interesting sideline of hers is
her hobby of. collecting some piece
of eqeuipment from the bad men
of hockey. Her eyes lit up when
she mentioned that ust , a few
wreeks ago she was given the stick
of Barry Hayton, Michigan 'de-
fenseman, who in her words is
"certainly one of the bad men of
the league."

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