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February 23, 1958 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-02-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

UBLIC'S TRUST
'PUBLIC TRUST
See Page 4

f:Yl r e

Sixty-Seven Years of Editorial Freedom

43* a t

A
FAIR, WARMER

M I, No. 101

ANN ARBOR MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1958

FIVE CENTS

1

"

imers Club Spartans

Indonesians

Hit Rebels Aga

Three

'M' leers

7C

*

*

*

0Win

CARL RISEMAN
of disqualifications in
w'o races forced Michit-
wrful swim team to un-
d heights as it romper-
usly beaten Michigan
0, ye erdaY at the Var-
bion PooL
frecords, also fell as the
smashed a supposedly
an team in the "dream
of the year" and ex-
winning streak to six

the 400-yd.
partan team
by a couple
gan was dis-
,ten left the
e teammate
shed his leg~

Edge, Past
G ophers,' 3 =2B81CLMN
By SI COLEMAN
Michiga °s hockey team gained
both. a wn and regained some
prestige as it outfought Minnesota
to capture a 3-2 decision last night
at the Coliseum.
When the Wolverines scored at
1:51 of the opening frame to take
a 1-0 lead, it looked as though
there might be a repeat of Frikay's
10-5 scoring.marathon.
Mattson Notches Clincher
'But both teams settled downA
to a hard checking type of play,
matching each other twice, goal
for goal, until with three minutes
and 20 seconds remaining in the
contest, the only American on
Michiga'n's team, Gary Mattson,
scored his second goal, and un-
doubtedly his most important one
of the season to break a 2-2 tie
and give Michigan a season split
with Minnesota.
John Hutton centered the puck
from behind the Gopher nets, and
Mattson, who had registered his
first goal of the season only the
night before, deftly tapped it past
Minnesota's Jack MiCartan. Steve
Bochen also received an assist on
the game-winning goal.
Michigan, playing an aggressive
game from the start, made it pay
off early. ,For the opening two
minutes of the contest, the Wol-
verines put tremendous pressure
on McCartan.
McDonald, Switzer Collaborate
Then, Ed Switzer, fighting for
the puck in the corner, gained
possession of it and passed it to
MVichigan's captain, Neil Mc-
Donald. McDonald faked once and
See MATTSON'S, page 7,

Posts,Radio
Stations Hit
In Sumatra
New Governnient's
Strongholds Strafed
PADANO, Sumatra (M) - Indo-,
nesian bombers hit three revolu-
tionary strongholds in Central
Sumatra and the noxth Celebes
yesterday, knocking out their com-
munications.
The planes bombed, rocketed,
and strafed the radio stations and
all post, telegraph and telephone
stations in this stronghold and in
the rebel capital of Bukittingi, 58
miles to the northwest.
No casualties were reported in
the surprise half-hour morning at-
tack by three United .States-made
P51 fighters and a B25 bomber.
Another raid silenced the radio
station at Menado, rebel capital
in the north Celebes, where mili-
tary leaders have declared their
support for the revolutionary re-
gime proclaimed here a week ago.
Indonesian Air Force planes
also bombed several important.
bridges near Menado, 1,500 miles
northeast of Jakarta. Padang is
600 miles west of Jakarta.
There also was a report of an
attack on Muara Bongo in the
Diambi area of south Sumatra, an
area hitherto considered neutral.
The government radio in Ja-
karta confirmed the raids on Pa-
dang and Bukittingieand said res-
idents- in 'the "target areas were
warned by broadcasts to stand
clear.
The broadcast said all land, sea
and air communications between
Java on which Jakarta is located
and central Sumatra had been cut.

Rocket Pact with

U."

*

*

Affirmfed by IB ritai

*

NOW OFFICIAL HEAD:

n

Amer

0

Nasser Takes Control!
Of New Arab Republic
CAIRO (P)-Gamal Abdel Nasser, once little known officer in the
Egyptian army, became president of the United Arab Republic yester-
day with almost absolute power over 27 million people in Syria and
Egypt.
Nasser told a cheering crowd of 500,000 persons in Cairo's Re-
public Square that the republic is a big weapon for the Arabs and the.
foundation stony of a united Arab world. He proclaimed the United
Arab Republic as the protector of all Arabs.

To Re

*

points.
s Acain

i race tne 2-
'ries' dsqualifi -
in an apparentl
teammate Dick
e 220 in 2:05.7
cord, Michigan
nts, 12-5.
tary advantage
brough the dis--
s permanently
: became more

oolley swam one of the
aes in his career, :22.8,
ad Michigan State's Don
in the 50-yd. freestyle.
railed through most of
but came on strong to
the Spartan star at th
tterson took second and
tgh of State took third
artans led for the last
.e meet, 16-10.

-yd. in-
ence of

the race,
ked with
bler. For
bler and
t out al
in front

however pulled away
and Hopkins began to
i the tired MSU star
swmmers were swim-
eaststroke. The parti-
r crowd began to yell
ent as Hopkins made
:opkins passed Dobler
0 yards .and was neck
'ROMPS, Page 6

-'~aily-- at McAiven
DICK KIMBALL
. - leading diver
Resignation
Of Benson
Demanded
WASHINGTON (M-Disgruntled
House Republicans from the Mid-
west yesterday challenged Secre-
tary of Agriculture Ezra Benson,
to offer to resign after they have
given President Dwight D. Eisen-
hower "all the facts."
Benson only Friday reaffirmed
his irtention to stay on the Job
after meeting with two represen-
tatives of the Midwest group.
However, Rep. Arthur Miller (R-
Neb.), who wrote Benson yesterday
on behalf of the group, predicted
"it might be a different story"
once they present their views to
President Eisenhower.
Rep. Miller said a six-mandele-
gation hopes ;to see President
Eisenhower early next week about'
their cotnention that the admin-
istration's farm policy must be
changed if the GOP is to win the
November congressional elections.
"I suggested that Benson resign
when the President has all the
facts," Rep. Miller said. "I don't
think the President has had all
the facts that he will have after
we get through talking to him."
Rep. Miller and Rep. Walter
Judd (R-Minn.) talked' pointedly
to Benson Friday but the secre-
tary said shortly afterward he
had no intention of dropping his
program of lower price supports.
Labor Uni
Talks Star
- - y

1

Mobs Approve
There was near panic and almost a stampede in the square as
the broad-shouldered Egyptian' leader stepped outside Abdin Palace.
Women became hysterical, and <-
police beat back the over-enthusi-
astic with belts and ropes..
In Damascus, capital of Syria,
cheering mobs streamed into the
streets, and native horsemen gal-
loped through the capital waving Evaluation
swords and shields.
Sudan Mentioned
Nasser was presented to the Gets Boost
Cairo throng as the first president
of the United Arab lpepublic. This
followed anrouncements here and WASHINGTON (W) -Manufac-
in Damascus that Friday's plebis- turers of the Northrop Snark
cites had approved almost unani- guided missile said yesterday the
mously the merger of the two Arab weapon now has a range of more
states with Nasser as president. than 6,300 miles.
Egypt's dispute with its south- It heretofore has been credited
ern neighbor, Sudan, over border with 5,000 miles.
areas took a back seat to, the cele- Able to cruise for 10 hours at
brations in this country and Syria. almost the speed of sound, thee;
But Nasser brought it up in his Snark was described as the only
speech, asserting that it Is fnot current weapon capable of low-
true that Egyptian forces have in- altitude attack upon virtually any
vaded the Sudan. target in Soviet Russia.
The United Arab Republic de- tS.u
fends and not threatens, preserves A powerful tool. for "massive'
and does not exploite or destry," intercontinental deterrent" pur-
Nasser said. poses was the way Northrup Vice
The Soviet Union announced President John R. Alison of Los
quickly it has recognized the new Angeles described It.
republic as an independent sov- Details Revealed:
ereign' state and sent Nasser a New or little known facts about
message of congratulations, the pilotless bomber were brought
In the plebiscites, the 71/2 mil- out by Alison and other Northrop
lion votes of Egypt and Syria had aircraft officials at a briefing here,
a choice of yes or no on whether designed to correct what they said
they wanted the merger of the two was widespread misunderstanding
countries and whether they want- of the Snark's mission and per-

t

I

ARTHUR LARSON
... presidential assistant
ie's Aide
To Lecture
Arthur Larson, former director
of the United States Information
Agency, will speak on "What We
Are For" at 8:30 p.m. tomorrow iq
Hill Aud.
Tickets for the speech, sixth in
the current Lecture Series; will be
on sale at the auditorium box of-
fice tomorrow. Larson will be ui-
troduced by University President
Harlan Hatcher.
Larson is now serving as special
assistant to President Dwight D.
Eisenhower. After he wrote his
book, "A Republican Looks at his.
Party" in 1956, he was asked to
assist the President Eisenhower in
the preparation of his speeches.
Larson has been recognized as
an authority on corporation law
and workman's compensation, and
served as Under Secretary of Labor
from 1954 until last year.
Postage, Plan
Failure Seen

are

ed Nasser as president.

Rocket S
Bilateral Agre
May Set Prece
For Atlantic A
LONOON 'WJ)-Britain
Ministry last night said
ment has been signed
ington providing for I
tip of rocket-launching
this country.
A spokesman said off
ments on the signing wi
tomorrow.
Under the pact, Uni
intermediate-range nucl
will be supplied to Brit
the end of this year.
British Man Bas
A British spokesman;
-porters, "All missile site,
in this country will 1
manned."
The signing of the ag
red-hot political issue
was announced in Lon
reports from Washington
a clampdown on in
available there.
A statement on the
is due t~o be fnadqint
of Commons tomorrow .

rngressman
arms Ouster
iterf erin g'
kSHINGTON (P) - Chairman
Harris (D-Ark.) said yester-
President Dwight D. Eisen-
r's administration would be
rfering" with his House sub-
nittee's probe of the Federal
nunications Commission if it
d the resignation now of FCC
nissioner Richard A. Mack.
p. Harris also said he doubts
risdom of Congress setting up
thical code aimed against
pulling in cases before sup-
ly independent regulatory
ies. Some subcommitteemen
proposed enactment of such

-Daily-Ian McNiven
GRABS REBOUND-Northwestern's reserve forward Dick Berry
(16), 7'1", tkes a rebound away fromMichigan's George'Lee (35).
Michigan Cagers Lose'
Northwestern, 75-66
By AL JONES
Northwestern's basketball team out-shot and out-hustled Michigan
yesterday afternoon to earn a 75-66 victory before a regional TV"
audience.
Five thousand fans at Yost Field House saw the Wildcats move
ahead of the Wolverines near the end of the first half and hold the
lead throughout the second to run their 'conference record to 6-5.
The "M" cagers hAe now fallen to a 4-6 mark, and are well
immersed in the second division of the Big Ten standings. This -was
their fourth straight defeat. The '

Doctors Call
Churchill OK
ROQUEBRUNE-CAP MARTN,
France (IW-Sir Winston Church-
Ill appeared victorious yesterday
nigljt in his battle against pneu--
monia and pleurisy.
"The improvement in Sir Win-
ston Churchill's condition is fully
maintained,"said a medical bul-
letin. "The temperature has fall-
en, and his_ progress is satisfac-
tory."
His secretary, Anthony Monta-
gue Browne, said the 83-year-old
Churchill's recoyery was so marked
that his doctors were thinking of
stopping their daily communiques.
Britain's wartime leader felt so
frisky, he threatened to go out
painting. Lord Moran, his person-
al physician, told him "not yet."

formance.
They said a new electronic de-
vice, specially installed on the
Snark, can trick enemy radar into
mistaking the fighter-size missile
for the largest of the jet bombers.
Thus Snarks can be' flown ahead
of a B52 bomber attack as decys
to cut down enemy interception of
United States strategic bombers.
Aimed Accurately
A big load carrier, they said the
Snark can plunge a large thermo-
nuclear warhead into enemy tar-
gets with "truly amazing accur-
acy."
Once it has left the ground, a
Snark is on its own. A pre-set'
self - contained inertial guidance
system directs it on, a straight,
zigzag, or looped course.
More than 50 Snarks have been
launched from the Air Force Mis-
sile Test Center at Cape Canav-
eral, Fla. Altogether they have,
flown the equivalent of three times
around the world at the equator.

WASHINGTON (A')-- Sen. Mi-
chael Monroney (D-Okla.) pre-
dicted yesterday the Senate will
vote next week for a four-cent
stamp on all letters instead of the
five cents asked by President
Dwight D. Eisenhower on non-
local mail..
The issue is to be fought out on
the Senate floor starting Tuesday,
when a postal rate increas6 bill
comes up for debate.
The present three cent stamp,
in effect since 1932, appears to be
on its way out by July 1.
The House voted last year for
a flat four-cent rate as part of a
postal revenue increase bill. Then
the Senate Post Office Committee
voted 7-6 last Thursday to amend
this measure to put a five-cent
rate on intercity letters for a
three-year period, July 1, 1958, to
June 30, 1961.

The agreement was du
been signed In Washin
Monday 0,' Tuesday, bu
ported delayed becau
Minister Harold Macmilh
to examine it further.
The accord between I
States and Britain is re
a pilot pact for other A
lies who agree to stati
bases in their territory.
British and American
have agreed on provisio:
sultation between the t,
in any situation demand
cision on the possible u
medium-range missiles-
rockets able to travel1,5C
miles.
The United Statesd
has agreed to provide
charge rockets with nuc'
heads, provided Britain
the money to build the b
is expected to total arou
lion dollars.
Lung Canc
Proves Fat
To Adm. Z(

He suggested a better course
would be for the agencies them-
selves to draw up codes of proper
conduct - then have the codes
available for congressional review.
Hearings Resume
The Arkansas Democrat spQke
to newsmen as his special subcom-
mittee prepared for resuming its
hearings tomorrow in its inquiry
into alleged pressures surrounding
the FCC award of lucrative TV
Channel 10 in Miami.
Mack, ticketed for questioning
under oath next week, has been
accused by ousted subcommittee
counsel Bernard Schwartz of re-
ceiving $2,650 from a lawyer

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. WP)-
The AFL-CIO will test its author-
ity to force merger of labor groups
on the state level at a 'three-day
convention opening here tomor-
row.
AFL-CIO President George
Meany ordered the special conven-
tion after two years of negotia-
tions had failed to bring about a
voluntary merger of the AFL and
CIO organizations in Michigan.
Meany's 15-million-member
united labor movement was formed
Dec. 5, 1955.

Northwestern quintet outplayed.
the Wolverines in the three most
important aspects of a basketball
game--hustle, shots and rebounds.
The hustle was perhaps the
greatest asset of the Wildcats, as
they took advantage of the often
loafing Wolverines. The first break
came near the end of the first
half. With 4:15 left to play, the
score was tied at 24 all.
During those last four minutes
the Northwestern team, sparked
by substitute guard Floyd Camp-
bell, dropped 12 points through the
twine compared to Michigan's
three, and owned a 36,27 inter-
mission lead.
A4, 41a 1arrt.ve. f+ -aa v

CIRCUS RETURNS:
Clowns, Cowby Caramel Corn Come to An Arbor

I.

By BARTON HUTHWAITE

The circus arrived in town yesterday.
One of the few remaining troupes of its kind, it came complete:
with clowns, cowboys and carmel corn.
Hundreds of excited children, some with special passes clutched
in their hands, jammed! the National Guard Armory to view the
colorful spectacle.
Owner Estimates
"I don't exactly know how long I've been in the circus business
.. must be about 40 years by now," John Patterson, owner of the
Patterson Brothers Circus, said thoughtfully.
Crippled by a trapeze accident in his youth, he gave up perform-
ing and turned to'producing. The stub of an unlit cigar jutted from

Rear Admiral Richa
administrative assistE
dean of the School 1
Administration, succu,
cancer yesterday after
five months.
Admiral Zern, 53 ye
first a professor and
man of the Departme
Science. He retired fro
in June with the rai
Admiral and 30 yeas
service behind him.
Prior to World War
Zern, a graduate of
States Naval Acaderr
Naval War College, w
Chief of Naval Opera
During the war he
the United States' A
and on various b
throughout the West,
He went to comman(
stroyer Squadron in I
Fleet and was with the
in athe Mediterranear
mediately after. Prior

r .t"4 _s"ri:Ki'w:"r}:r.Xti ."+u :34j:__.: }tit'i: ....

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