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February 15, 1957 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-02-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

PAGE WIHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I FRIDAT. PERIWARY 1 S. 19 K 7

a'.a.wa dres.a. l1'1i7i4LitliyZ . .$ 1.7.7

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TAKES WORLD TOUR:
Dunham Cites Recent
Advances In Rural India

!,'\.

By SARAH DRASIN
"India is a very old country
with centuries-old traditions,"
Prof. Arthur Dunham of the
School of Social Work related aft-
er a recent world-wide trip.
During a sabbatical leave, the
community organization specialist
and his wife travelled through
England and Europe before tour-
ing India, Pakistan, Burma, the
Philippines and Hawaii.
"C o m m u n i t y development,"
Prof. Dunham explained, "is a
term frequently used in connec-
tion with programs in rural com-
munities of so-called economically
under-developed countries.
"Community development in-
volves organized efforts to im-
prove conditions of community
life. This is done primarily
through the enlistment of 'self-
help' and cooperative effort from
the villagers with technical as-
sistance from government organ-
izations."
Cties Improvements
Characteristic improvements in
village life in India, Prof. Dun-
ham reported, include increases
in agricultural productivity and
livestock; construction of paved
roads, irrigation ditches, improved
housing and sanitary facilities;
organizing village industries, co-
operatives and youth clubs simi-
lar to our 4-H Clubs.
The School of Social Work has
a number of students from for-
eign countries interested in train-
ing for community development
programs in their own countries.
Prof. Dunham's study was under-
taken to examine possible im-
provements in training students
interested in this field.
Since India serves as the larg-
est and one of the best examples
of community development, Prof.
Dunham took this opportunity to
observe progress being made there
as well as in several other Asiatic
countries.
Until recently there was little
realization of rural needs in.these
countries.
"Since our great masses are
concentrated in urban areas in
the United States, it may be hard
for us to realize the situation in
a country such as India, where
85 percent of 360,000,000 people
live in 550,000 villages," he said.
Since the end of World War II,
Prof. Dunham continued, when
many Asiatic countries became in-
dependent, we have realized Asia's
rural potential. Mahatma Gandhi
first realized the importance of
the villages of India, and tried to
close the great gap between rural
and urban dwellers, Prof. Dun-
ham added.
Many Villages Affected
Regarding the progress already
made in India, he related at least
100,000 villages have been affected
by the community development
program in India's first and sec-'
ond Five-Year Plans.
'Community development is one

of the most important economic
and social movements in the
world today," Prof. Dunham as-
serted. "If these programs are
carried on effectively for 10 to
20 years, they may perform in-
calculable services in raising the
standards of living, improving
rural life, giving the villagers new
hope of better living and strength-
ening the foundations of demo-
cratic societies in the world to-
day."
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)
gree of assurance is subject to a great
degree of variance as viewed by the
committee. Any future acts of "good
faith" would have to be strong enough
to overcome the apparent acts of "bad
faith" perpetrated at Cornell and Tufts.
The majority of the recommenda-
tions involve a period of "grace." It
must be understood by all parties con-
cerned that any such period is not a
"backing down" by Student Govern-
ment Council, but merely an effort to
be fair to the local chapter and to
solve the real issue. There was some
feeling that a form of pressure bhould
be brought to bear for earliest possible
action by the national organization.
The recommendations differ by the
time allotted and the pressure brought
to bear. Each plan has advantages and
disadvantages peculiar to themselves.
It is up to Student Government Coun-
cil to weigh these and make the final
decision.
RECOMMENDATION A: This can be'
considered the majority recommenda-
tion. It is the most liberal. It allows
the longest period of time to work out
the difficulty and places the least
amount of pressure on the rorority,
either national or local, for immedi-
ate action.
"Student Government shall allow
Kappa Sigma sorority until September
of 1958 to resolve the violation determ-
ined on December 5, 1956. At that time
University recognition will be with-
drawn from National Sigma Kappa un-
less the sorority takes action to re-
move such discriminatory member-
ship policies."
Lectures'
University Lecture. Fri., Feb. 15, 4:10
p.m., Aud. A, Angell Hall. Roland Bain-
ton, Titus Street Prof. of Ecclesiasti-
cal History, Yale University. "Some
Aspects of the Reformation." Sponsored
by the LS&A Committee on Studies in
Religion and the Department of His-
tory.
American Chemical Society Lecture.
8:00 p.m. Feb. 15, Room 1300, Chemistry
Building. Dr. Frank Spedding, Director
of the Institute for Atomic Research,
Ames, Iowa on "The Rare Earths."
Academic Notices
Law School Admission Test: Candi-
dates taking the Law School Admis-
sion Test on Feb. 16 are requested to
report to Aud. B, Angell Hall at 8:45
a.m. Sat.
History 150 has been moved from 44T
Mason Hall to 2402 Mason Hall.

Launguage Exam for Masters Candi-
dates in History will be given March
1, 4:00 p.m. 439 Mason Hall.
History Make-Up Exams "will be given
March 2, 9-12 a.m., 429 Mason Hall.
Psychology Colloquium. Dr. Joseph
Adelson, visiting professor from Ben-
nington College, "Some Empirical Stu-
dies of Psychoanalytic Theory," Fri.,
Feb. 15., 4:15 p.m., Aud. B., Angell Hall.
Organizational meeting for the Sem-
inar on Hydrodynamics and Magneto-
Hydrodynamics Fri., Feb. 15, 4:00 p.m.,
Room 247, W. Engineering.
Anatomy Seminar in Room 2301 East
Medical Building. Coffee will be served
one-half hour before in Room 3502 of
East Medical Building. Feb. 15, 4:00
p.m. Dr. R. T. Woodburne, Department
of Anatomy andl Dr. Jack Lapides, De-
partment of Surgery: "Micturitlon."
Astronomical Colloquium. Fri., Feb.
15, 4:15 p.m., The Observatory. Dr. Wil-
liam Liller will speak on "The Photo-
electric Monochrometer: Description
and Application."
Rotating Seminar in Statistics (Uni-
versity of Michigan with Michigan
State and Wayne State Universities)
will meet in Room 3201, Angell Hall
on Sat., Feb. 16 at 2:00 p.m. Papers
presented will be (1) "A Theorem Con-
cerning the Existence of Stationary Ab-
solute Probability Distributions for a
Markov Chain," by Prof. S.T.C, Moy,
Wayne State University; 12) "The In-
variance Principle and a Generaliza-
tion of the Hunt-Stein Theorem," by
Prof. Oscar Wesler, University of Michi-
gan.
Events Today
Coffee Hour: Lane Hall, Fri., Feb. 15,
4:15-5:30 p.m.
Placement Notices
The following schools have listed
vacancies on their teaching staffs with
the Bureau of Appointments for the
1957-58 school year. They will not be in
to interview at this time.
Aurora, Illinois -- All Elementary;
Elementary Boys Physical Education.
Bakersfield, California - All Ele-
mentary (K-8); Mentally Retarded;
Speech Correction;Hardy f Hearing;
Vocal & Instrumental Music; Indus-
trial Arts; Agriculture; H;!memaking;
Girls Physical Education; Elementary
Art.
Benzonia, Michigan - All Elemen-
tary; English or Social t. zudies.
Des Plaines or Park Ridge, Illinois-
German; Latin; Spanish.
Island Trees, Levittown, New York-
Spanish/German or French; Math;

General Science; Homemaking; Vocal
Music; Business Education; Industrial
Arts; Art; English; Citizenship Educa-
tion Librarian; Ouidance.
Lake Ronkonkoma, Long Island, New
York-All Elementary; Elementary Boys
Physical Education; Elementary Girls
Physical Education; English; Math;
Citizenship Education; French/English;
Physics/Biology; General' c Si e n c e;
Homemaking; Business Education; Vo-
cal Music; Instrumental Music.
Leonia, New Jersey - elementary
Art; Elementary Grades (2nd, 4th, 5th
and 6th).
Montpelier, Vermont -- All Elemen-
tary; Junior High; Arithmetic/ English;
Reading; Science; Geography; Senior
High General Science/Math English/
Social Studies.
Plainfield, New Jersey - Asst. Li-
brarian.
Powers, Michigan - Band/Music;
Commercial.
Uniondale, New York - 'uidance
Counselor; Librarian; uchool Nurse;
Psychologist; Art; Business Education;
English/Citizenship Education; Eng-
lish; Citizenship Education; Driver Ed-
ucation; Language; Homemaking; In-
dustrial Arts; Math; Vocal Music; In-
strumental Music; Health; General
Science; Physics. -
Westfield, New Jersey -- All Elemen-
tary; Junior High English; Math; Com-
mercial; Science; Home Economics;
Girls Physical Education; Math Sci-
ence; English; French; Social Studies;
Psychologist.
Winnetka, Illinois - English.
For additional information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Ad-
ministration Building, NO 3-1511, Ext.
489.
Personnel Requests:
Hercules Powder Co., Cumberland,
Md., has vacancies for Chemical Engrs.,
Physicists, Mechanical Engrs., Civil,
Elect. Engrs., Chemistry and Physical
Chemists. The work will be in Guided
Missile Research and Development.
Dewey and Almy Chem. Co., The
Cyrovac Co., and Dewey and Almy Ov-
erseas Co., Divisions of W.R. Grace &
Co., offer unlimited )pportunity to

technical people in Engineering, Chem-
istry, Physics and Radiation and to
non-technical people in Acctg., Fi-
nance, Market Research, Sales, and
Advertising and Journalism. PoAttcns'
experience requirements range from 0
to 10 years.
Armstrong Cork Co., Lancaster, Pa.,
has openings in Advertising, Promo-
tion and Public Relations for men
with degrees in Journalism, English,
and Speech. There are also openings
for non-technical people in Sales.
There are many positions open to Che-
mists, Engineers and Physicists for Re-
search and Development.
Aninstitution in Washington, D.C..
is in need of an Executive Husekeeper.
Hartford Accident and indemnity Co.,
Detroit, Mich., is looking for a man
with a business law background andI
one year of accounting for training
as a special agent.
Green Giant Co., LeSueur, Minn.,
needs a man with a BA or MA in Sta-
tistics, Economics or ..larketing, and
possibly some course work in Psy-
chology or Social Sciences.
U.S. Veterans Administration Hos-
pital, Dearborn, Mich., announces an
examination for men to work as Nurs-
ing Assistants GS-2 and 3.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin.
Bldg., Ext. 3371.
Personnel Interviews:
Representatives from the following
will be at the Engineering t .hool:
Mon., Feb. 18
Air Associates, Inc., Orange, N.J. -
all levels in Elect., Mech., Math., Instr.,
or Physics for Research, Development,
and Design. U.S. citizens.
Centralab-Division of Globe-Union
Inc., Milwaukee, Wis. - B.S. or M.S.
In Che.E., Elect., Ind., Instr., Mat'ls,
Math., Mech., or Physics; B.S. Engrg.
Mech. for Research, Development, De-
sign, and Production. U.S. citizen.
The Chicago Screw Co., Div., Stan-
dard Screw Co., Bellwood, Illinois -
B.S. or M.S. in Ind., Mech., Engrg.
Mech. or Metal. for Development, Pro-
duction and Sales.
The Clark Controller Co., Cleveland,

Ohio-B.S. or M.S. in Elect., Ind..
Mech., for Development, Design, Pro-
duction, and Sales.
Dow Corning Corp. Midland, Mich.
B.S. or M.S. in Ch.E., Elect., and Mech.;
and all levels in Chemistry for Re-
search, Product Engrg., Design & Con-
struction Engrg, and Sales. U.S. citi-
zen.
Electro Metallurgical Co., Niagara
Falls, N.Y. - B.S. or M.S. in Ch.E.,
Civil, Elect., Ind., Math., Mech., Nu-
clear, Physics for Research, Devel.,
Design, Production, Sales, Works
Engrg., Power, Purchasing, Mining, Ind.
Rel. and Mfg. Office.
For appointments contact the Egrg.
Placement Office, 347 W.E., Ext. 2182.

Use of this column is restricted to tournament, Feb. 15, 7:30 p.m., Union.
OFFICIALLY REGISTERED student or- *
ganizations. Registration forms are Roger Williams Fellowship, Inter-
available it the Office of Student Af- mural party, Feb. 15, 7:00 p.m., Guild
fairs, 1020 Administration Building. House.
Registration for the current semester , * *
should be completed not later than Japanese Students' Club, general
March 2. meeting, Feb. 16, 7:30 p.m., Madelon
Union Bridge Club, Duplicate Bridge Pound House (1024 Hill).
Read and Use Daily Classilieds

t.

IN

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7

DON'T WAIT!
Take advantage of the
'Ensign record offer
TODAY!
33V3 rpm record of
"Sounds that are typically MICHIGAN"
Only 74c with a subscription to the
MICH IGANENSIAN

a

I

.r

CAMP COUNSELLOR OPENINGS
-- for Faculty, Students and Graduates -
TH E ASSOCIATION OF PRiVATE CAMPS
. comprising 250 outstanding Boys, Girls, Brother-Sister and Co-
Ed Camps, located throughout the New England, Middle Atlantic
States and Canada.
INVITES YOUR INQUIRIES concerning summer employment as
Counsellors, Instructors or Administrators.
. . POSITIONS in children's camps, in all areas of activities, are
available.
WRITE, OR CALL IN PERSON:
ASSOCIATION OF PRIVATE CAMPS - DEPT. C
55 West 42d Street, Room 743 New York 36, N.Y.

i I

Restaurants You,1V

CHUCK WAGON
FAMOUS FOR ROAST BEEF
LUNCH and DINNERS Fine Salads & Sandwiches
2045 PACKARD NO 2-1661
Catering at Your Home or Hall Henry Turner, Prop.

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ViOii Enjoy This Weekend
Use this restaurant guide
to make your weekend more enjoyable.

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141.
SYLVAN I A
will be on
this campus
FRIDAYIMARCH1
for the purpose of interviewing engineering applicants
See your Placement Director to arrange an appointment
- SYLVANIA r
SYLVANIA ELECTRIC PRODUCTS INC.

Make Your weekend
more enjoyable!
Our chefs are ready to prepare the most delicious food
for your enjoyment.
You will be served the finest in
Cantonese and American food
TAKE-OUT ORDERS ANY TIME

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A .
' o r
..r.
.arm
'{yta '

Closed Mondlay
LEO PING
118 West Liberty
Phone NO 2-5624

FOWLER'S
Delivered
By Ann Arbor
SPEEDY DELIVERY
With Warming Oven Equipped Truck
Lor 50c per order
DELIVERIES MADE EVERY HOURj

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Dine at WEBER'S
this weekend for

SMORGASBORD

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OWERI

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r. AE SHOTEL
5. THAYER STREET

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
THE ART OF ENJOYING SMORGASBORD
Tomight YOU are the artista for the SMORGAsMORD is
grand adventure and is considered a "mcassic" culinary art.
melp yourself first to the many kinds of fish, berigs and
seafood. Then return for the salads, meats and cheese. Finaly
select from our tasty ht delicacies.
"SMlRGASBORD" can be tuaced back to the old Viking
feast days, when distances were long; bit at the end of all jou.
asys one could find romance and gaiety at the SMdRGASBORD.'
the lonely man besieged with troubles and sorrow could fand

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