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May 29, 1957 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-05-29

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 29, 057

TIC, MICHIGAN DAILY

THhMCIA AL EDEDY A 915

Organization
NoticesI
Wolverine Club, Block M Committee
Sign-ups, Wednesday, May 29 through
Friday, May 31, Wolverine Office, 2522
Student Activities Building.
Education School Council, final busi-
ness meeting, May 29; 4:10, 3524 Stu-
dent Activities Building.
Graduate Outing Club, canoeing, hik-
ing, swimming, and other activities,
every Sunday during the summer, 2:00,
Rackham.
The Episcopal Student Foundation,
breakfast at Canterbury House fol-
lowing" the 7:00 a.m. celebration of
Holy Communion at the. Church, May
30.
The Episcopal Student Foundation,
luncheon at Canterbury House follow-
ing the 12:10 celebration of Holy Coi-
rmunion at the Church, May 30.

Cowley Discusses Publis

By JOAN KAATZ
"Best prescription for getting a
book published is to write it well,"
Malcolm Cowley advised recently
at a Michigan Writer's Conference
informal discussion.
Cowley, editor of "The Portable
Hemingway" and "The Portable
Faulkner", spoke on the subject
of publishing houses and their
treatment of manuscripts.
Many Novels Written
According to Cowley, there were
never as many novels being writ-
ten and so few being published as
now. This leads to the unpublished
writer's curiosity about the pub-
lisher.
"Often," he mused, "the unpub-

lished writer thinks the plublisher
is a many-headed watchdog swal-
lowing up several manuscripts at
a time. However, if a publisher can
find anew author it certainly is
is a feather in his cap," he added.
Cowley went on to explain how
a manuscript gets handled once
it reaches the publishing house.
The first reader, "one of the
lowly publishing institutions",
briefly reads the manuscript and
then makes a decision on the ba-
sis of style and story-line, accord-
ing to Cowley.
Receives Second Reading
If the story is good, it receives
a second reading by one of sev-
eral editors. If it meets with his
approval it is then brought up at
the editor's -meeting.
"This is always called a meet-
ing and never a conference, al-
though that is essentially what it
is," Cowley quipped. "I guess 'the

ing Houses
meeting' is just another publish-
ing tradition," he added.
A manuscript may become so-
licited if the publisher finds an
author's work which he likes in
such magazines as The New York-
er, Harper's or Atlantic Monthly.
In this case the manuscript may
skip over the first reader and go
directly to the editor.
Bypasses First Reader
Occassionally a story may by-
pass the first reader if brought to
the company by a good agent or
highly recommended by someone
in the literary field, he said.
Once a manuscript is ready for
publishing, a meeting of salesmen
from all over the country is called.
He explained, "At the editor's
meeting all the weaknesses of the
book are brought out, but at the
sales meeting it's as if the book
were another Hamlet."

'GREEKEST' HAS FIRM HAND:
Adams Enjoying Classes After Years on SL, SGC

WORRIED ?°= a
EXAM TIME~.~
is Outline Time A
Use our condensed
STUDPY OU=TLINE S
for EXAMS
ALL SUBJECTS

By VERNON NARRGANG
There was a time, not too many
months ago, when the visitor to
a Student Government Council
meeting watched progressive and
orderly procedure - under the
firm gavel hand of Bill Adams.
As president during SGC's sec-
ond year of existence, Adams
brought a quiet, m o d e r a t e,
thoughtful tone to the Council and
its meetings, raising SGC's status
on campus and leading the Coun-
cil to final recognition only last
week as the "official" voice of the
student body.
At all meetings Adams was
Council Chief. His efficient hand-
ling of the controversial initial
meeting on Sigma Kappa - re-
membered today as "Dec. 5"-re-
mains a source of secret pride to
him.
Order Keeping
With hundreds of constituents
and onlookers in the Union ball-
room, emotions running high,
notes passing wildly, verbal mes-
sages flowing like water and ev-
eryone wanting to speak, Adams
made the decisions and kept the
order.
"An AP correspondent told me
after the meeting that it went
very well," Adams relates. "It
helped."
His entrance into graduate busi-
ness administration school in
February forced the ex-president's
resignation from SGC - just one
month before his second term as
president was to expire.
But that was not the end of his
three years' work with SGC.
At the very next meeting, speak-
ing from the floor as a constitu-

cause "I was the Greekest Greek
they could find."
As a Greek, Adams finds some
value in the democracy of fra-
ternity living. "The right kind of
leaders," he claims, "can do a
great deal for all whlo are there."
Literary Meaning
On fraternities as institutions,
the Grosse Pointer notes, "a lot
of them started out as literary
organizations. If only they could
go back to their beginnings."
Looking at his own college years
since their beginnings, Adams
comes'up with two "gripes".
'First, the student who fails to
live up to what is expected of him
as a somewhat mature and respec-
table individual. This is the stu-
dent too scared to take on himself
the responsibility of a mature
young adult in society, the person
who never rises above the level of
the 'social student' who regards
college as a good time and classes
as a thing to which he must go.
"Second, organizations that, be-
cause of similarity in member in-
terests and organization, attempt
to fuse memberships together in
one unified opinion and one train
of thought - mass that from the
outside could be identified as hav-
ing only this one thing in com-
mon."

'1

jI

1

r

t

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LONG
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Ulrich's Bookstore

BILL ADAMS
.. , for the Council Chief, his "smilingest" pose

p "

U

ent, Adams tongue-lashed the
"stupidity" of the Council's hav-
ing gone into executive session to
discuss the filling of a vacancy.
Laugh Breaking
This; in a way, is only charac-
teristic of Adams' unpredictability.
His usually solemn face may at
any time break into a sudden
laugh. Even his February resigna-

tion came as a shock to all but a
few knowing Council members.
His medium height and husky,
"tweedy" appearance, coupled
with the briefcase he is seldom
seen without, have spurred friends
on to calling him John Foster.
Other "friends", mostly those at
the Sigma Alpha. Epsilon house,
call him The Greek, mostly be-

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Your Key to Dining Pleasure

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Energy Wasting
Adams sees little value and
wasted energy in some organiza-
tions. "The only reason for join-
ing together," he says of fraterni-
ties, "is for work on rushing, lead-
ershiptraining, or certain bene-
fits to individuals."
Instead, he visualizes "one all-
encompassing student govern-
ment, with a vice-president for
fraternities and a committee for
coordination of rushing."
Looking again at his year as
SGC president, Adams singled out.
"the greatest accomplishment" as
"no one incident, but SOC's plac-
ing of the entire campus above
any one interest group."
He lists three personal accom-
plishments of his work in, student
government, whichbegan with
election to Student Legislature in
1954:
"A great broadening of my own
experiences, the satisfaction of
personal ambition, and the use of
critical examples that could be
carried over to the classroom."
Class Attending
The classroom, by the way, is
just where Adams has been lately
-finding out, as all former cam-
pus leaders do, that it is fun to
be a student.
As a part of the graduate Bus.
Ad. curriculum, he plans to work
this summer and next fall, re-
turning to school in February to
complete work on his masters' de.
gree.
Adams also plans to take a few
weeks out in August, when Lynn
Laviolette, '59, and he propose to
be married. The couple will live in
Ann Arbor while each finishes
school.
"In honor of this occasion,"
Adams announced, "the National>
Student Association is holding its
annual Congress here this sum-
mer."
But, most of all, Adams says,
"I've really enjoyed being a stu-
dent - having time to investigate
things, to get papers in on time,
to visit the library, and to visit
with faculty members."

.

Ti4 s
by A. Michelson

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