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May 25, 1957 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-05-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

rouR

THE MCRIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, MAY 25,195x_

FOUR TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY. MAY 25. 1957

Ir

i

Net,

Track,

Golf Squads Place

in Big

Ten Finals

__ _ . ,
-,,r

<"

Netmen

Win All;

ANOTHER CHANCE TODAY
Mansfield Quells Wolverine Power
(Continued from Page 1) I

The Future

Thinclads Third
M' Tennis Team Bell, Davis Lead
Cops 15 Matches First Day Rounds

IN SOME RESPECTS writing the final column is even harder than
the first, because this time the author is supposed to be some sort
of an "expert" as to what has happened. Instead of just looking back
however, I would like to take the liberty to glance into the future
of the Michigan athletic scene. These predictions must of necessity
be largely based on recent sports history and trends here:
We can look for Michigan not only to be a good football power
next fall but also to be reasonably strong in the immediate years to
come. Don't underrate or overestimate the Wolverines. Michigan
will not undermine itself by offering more to get the best high school
players. But strangely enough Michigan will benefit definitely by
the new Big Ten financial aid program based upon need.
With all factors of finance nearly equal, what institution -in
this part of the country can offer as many educational advantages
and as strong an overall reputation? So you can bet that Michigan
will not let quality slip any in its biggest physical production - foot-
ball.
Watch for Basketball .. .
W ATCH ALSO for a slow change in basketball here. This may part-
ly come about with the end of a distinct era in hockey. Interest
in hockey will not die immediately, but the quality should start to
fade. At the same time, basketball should start to regain its footing
as it did during parts of this past season.
As for all the other major Michigan sports, it is hard to say
anything other than that the overall records should continue to be
good. For example, swimming has
an immediately bright future..
Track and wrestling are at points
where they can get back to the
very top with some rebuilding.
Gymnastics, meanwhile, has a
pretty good outlook.
In the spring sports, tennis
reached its greatest peak this year,f
and it will be a long, long timef
before Michigan will be such ar
dominant tennis power again.
While golf is going to have to re-f
build, baseball seems to be back
on the tipswing.l
Personnel Changes
There are going to be several4
changes in coaching personnel'
fairly soon. Ray Fisher and Cliff x:.
Keen will have to retire, and my
guess is that Bennie Oosterbaan BENNIE OOSTERBAAN
will also decide to leave the coach- what lies ahead?
ing ranks within a few years.'
If basketball coach Bill Perigo is not able to produce more successful
teams, there is the chance that he may decide to move on for -an-
other fresh start.
Changes in the athletic .physical plant are a major part of the
view ahead. The biggest project seems to center around talk of a
new field house. Speculgtion goes to' the point of a building large
enough to house a new hockey arena in addition to the other regu-
lar facilities. This probably will knot come immediately, but look for
it soon, especially if H. O. "Fritz" Crisler stays on until retirement.
(It's interesting to speculate that if Michigan had a consistently good
basketball team at preseit, how could the first arena of its kind
built anywhere - Yost Field House - accomodate the large crowds?)
t* *
The Stadium . '
THERE ARE estimates that the University enrollment is going to
be around 40,000 by 1975. Maybe in the "Year 1999," we might
even see a new seating deck on the Michigan Stadium. This excel-
lently designed structure was built with this possibility in mind.
On the subject of financial aid, I think that there will be
further change on the nation-wide level. This, of course, will effect
Michigan, which will probably continue to strive to keep unethical
practices as near as possible to a minimum. Codes will be re-evaluated,
and the pressure will be on each institution to take a tighter hold on
such problems as recruiting.
Spirit should be harder to come by as the increased enrollment
floods Ann Arbor. With the new senior college program at Flint,
someday we may see a rivalry develop quite similar to that of the
University of California at Berkley and the University of California
at Los Angeles (UCLA).
In the near future, there will be some changes in spirit with even
female cheerleaders for basketball games a-possibility.
These forecasts are not particularly earth-shaking, but they deal
with a subject that is a lot closer to most of us than we realize. Ath-
letics and competition are a part of the modern American culture
as they have been in almost every society.
Here at Michigan, athletics is a form of big business. And as with
most large enterprises, it serves a large number of people. For school
spirit, entertainment, and physical and educational values, intercol-
legiate athletics is solidly with us. For the participator here, there
is much to enjoy while learning. For the observer, there is much to
learn while enjoying.

By CARL RISEMAN
Special to The Daily
EVANSTON - Michigan's ten-
nis team is well on its way to
winihng its third straight Big Ten
tennis championship.
Coach Bill Murphy's squad won
every match in yesterday's full day
of tennis to take the preliminary
lead with 39 points.
The surprise team of the-meet
was Northwestern. The Wildcats
'playing on their home courts
weren't counted on to cause any
trouble, but after the first day,
are solidly in second place with 32
points.
Third place, far behind the two
Sleaders, belongs to Indiana and
Iowa, tied at 22 points. Then come
Illinois, 10; Ohio State, 7; Minne-
sota, 6; Michigan State, 5; Wis-
consin, 1; and Purdue has yet to
win a point.
All Wolverines Win
All six Wolverine singles play-
ers and all three doubles teams
emerged victorious yesterday. The
singles players will play their
semi-final and final rounds today,
while the doubles are ready to play
their final matches.
Michigan's number one singles
player, Barry MacKay, looked bet-
ter than he has all year in beat-
ing Bill Bisard of MSU in the pre-
lims, 6-2, 6-1. He followed this
win up with another in the first
round by trouncing Al Hentzen of
Wisconsin, 6-2, 6-0.
These trouncings were repeated
down the line from first to sixth.
At sixth,'Dale Jensen turned in
some exceptional tennis in beat-
ing Iowa's Lick Hood, 9-7, 6-2 in
the first round.
Today's s e m i- f i n a l singles
matches find MacKay facing Min-
nesota's Dave Heeley, Mark Jaffe
against Minnesota's Hugh Turney,
Captain Dick Potter against Indi-
.ana's George Fryman, Jon Erick-
son against Indiana's Bill Petrick,
John Harris against Indiana's
Ken Dillman, and Jensen against
Bob Gray, also of Indiana.
Doubles Action
In the doubles action, the finals
shape up as Michigan versus
Northwestern. All three Wolverine
and all three Wildcat teams ad-
vanced into the finals.
Yesterday's best doubles match
was at second doubles where Jaffe
and Erickson beat Bob Brecken-
ridge and Jim Van Tine of Illinois,
1-6, 6-3, 6-4.
The Wolverine netters were be-
hind four games to one in the fi-
nal set, but they made a great
comeback to take the preliminary
match.
Michigan's coach Bill Murphy
sported a smile on his face after
yesterday's action and the only
quote he would offer was: "Things
look pretty good for tomorrow."
STATISTICS
Singles
1. MacKay (M) de. Bisard (MSU),
6-2, 6-1 (Prelim)
MacKay (M) def. Hentzen (W),
6-?., 6-0 (first round)
2. Jaffe (M) de. Righter (P), 6-2,
6-0 (Prelim)
Jaffe (M) def. Huddleston (Ind)
6-1, 6-2 (first round)
3. Potter (M) def. Swanson (Minn)
6-3, 6-1 (first round)
4. Erickson (M) def. Shillingslaw (N),
9-11, 6-0, 6-2 (prelim)
Erickson (M) def. Mescall (MU)
6-3, 3-6, 6-2 (first round)
5. Harris (M) ef.sCummings (osu,
6-1, 4-6, 6-3 (first round)
6. Jensen (M) def. Hood (Ia.), 9-7, 6-2
( first round)
Doubles
1. MacKay-Potter (M) def. Noble-
Holtmann, (Ill.), 6-4, 6-2 (Prelim)
MacKay-Potter (M) def. Parchute-
Fryman (Id.), 6-4, 6-3 (quarter-
finals)
2. Jaffe-Erickson (M) def. Brecken-
ridge-Van Tine (I11.), 1-6, 6-3, 6-4
(Prelim)
Jaffe-Erickson (M) def. Huddles-
ton-Petrick (Ind.), 7-5, 8-6, (quar-
ter-finals)
3. Harris-Jensen (M) de. Gillmann
and Gray (nd.), 6-1, 6-3 (Prelim)
Harris-Jensen (M) def. Hood-
Middlebrook (Ia.) 7-5, 6-3, (quarter-
finals)

Cricket Teams
Play Today
Michigan International students
will stage their annual I-M crick-
et game this afternoon at Ferry
Field at 1 p.m.
India, last year's champion, will
face Commonwealth, a team made
up of students from Australia,
Pakistan, and other countries.
The groups had originally in-
tended to play a three-game
series, but due to the proximity of
final exams, only one game will
be played.

By AL JONES
Special to The Daily
EVANSTON - Indiana became
the odds-on favorite to relieve
Michigan of the Big Ten outdoor
track title by qualifying 13 men
in seven preliminary events here
yesterday.
Hot on the Hoosiers heels came
Ohio State, second to Indiana last
March in the indoor finals, with
nine men.
Michigan, fourth in the indoors,
did "as well as expected" by Coach
Don Canham as it placed men in
five events to tie with Northwest-
ern.
As expected, Olympians Greg
Bell of Indiana and Glen Davis of
Ohio State led the qualifying
rounds by placing in seven events
between them.
Three Events for Bell
Bell won three preliminaries
but set no records in his specialty
-the broadjump. The Hoosier
senior, who has been making an
assault on Jesse Owens' 22-year-
old world and Conference record
of 26'84" in the event, leapt 25'
32" to'lead all qualifiers by al-
most two and one-half feet.
Davis, while he did not win any
prelims, held up the Buckeyes by
qualifying in four events. Running
without apparent strain, the Ohio
star placed in the 100-yd. dash,
both hurdles and the broadjump.
MSU. Illinois Falter
While, the Buckeyes and the
Hoosiers performed as predicted,
two other pre-meet favorites,
Michigan State and Illinois al-
most completely fell apart.
The Spartans qualified only one
man, Dave Lean, whose 1:53.7
clocking topped the 880-yd. en-
tries, and Illinois qualiifed but
three in the seven preliminary
events.
None of the Michigan qualifiers
provided any of the day's best
times but two of them turned in
excellent performances. Laird
Sloan placed third in his heat of
the 440-yd. dash, running what
Canham described as an "excel-
lent race." Lou Williams was sec-
ond among broadjump qualifiers
with a 'best-of-the-year-leap' of
22'11%2".
The other Michigan qualifiers
were Jim Pace in the 100-yd. dash,
Robin Varian in the 880-yd. run
and Dick Flodin in the 220-yd.
dash.
In the day's only final event -
the discus, Illinois picked up six
points with a second and fourth
to take at least a temporary lead.

Clark, got the next two men to
fly out, bringing the disastrous
inning to a close.
MSU potent flinger, Mansfield,
demonstrated excellent poise along
with his effective assortment of
pitches. He possessed very little
speed, but more than compen-
sated for it by feeding the hitters
plenty of curves and change ups.
Men on Base
Michigan began the fourth, fifth,
and sixth innings by getting a man
on base, but in each of those stan-
zas the leadoff batter was erased
by a double play.
The greatest scoring threat
mustered by the losers occurred in
bottom of the ninth. Boros led off

with a single, followed by a walk
to Bob Sealby, who pitched hitless
relief ball in the eighth and ninth
innings, and catcher Gene Snider's
second one-base hit of the day.
Then with two away, Jim Dickey
worked Mansfield to a three-two'
count before grounding out to the
shortstop to end the game.
Yesterday's game was witnessed
by the largest crowd of the sea-
son. Forty-five hundred fans
were on hand, some of them Ma-
jor League scouts, to witness
Michigan's second loss of the sea-
son at home.
Emphasizing the caliber of
Pitching seen in yesterday's game
was the fact that not one of the
ten hits was for extra bases, also,
MSU didn't get one runner past
second with the exception of the
three that scored, while Michigan.
had only one man that advanced
as far as third.
I BIG TEN BASEBALL
Michigan State 3, MICHIGAN 0
Northwestern 1, Illinois 0
Iowa 4, Ohio state 3
Wisconsin 11, Purdue 2
Indiana 5, Minnesota 4

/OerStated
MICHIGAN STATE AB R H RBI E
Warner, ss 4 1 0 0 0
Russell, rf 3 1 0 0 0
Palamara, 2b 4 1 1 0 .0
Luce, c 400 0 0
Davis, lb 4 0 1 2 0
Mendyk, if 3 0 2 1 0
McKenzie, cf 4 0 0 0 0
Scheisel, 3b 3 0 0 0 0
Mansfield, p 3 0 0 0 1
TOTALS 32 3 4 3 1
MICHIGAN AB R H RBI E
Myers, 3b 4 0 2 0 1
Fox,lif 3 00 0 0
Tippery,2b 3 0 0 0 0
Boros, ss 4 0 2 0 0
Herrnstein, p-ef 3 0 0 0 0
Clark, p 0 00 0 0
Hutchings, of 2 0 0 0 0
Sealby, p 1 0 0 0 0
Vukovich, lb 3 0 0 0 0
Snider, c 3 02 0 0
Lews,it 200 0 0
Dickey, rf 1 0 0 0 0
TOTALS 30 0 6 0 1
MICHIGAN STATE 000 003 000-3 4 1
MICHIGAN 000 000 000-0 6 1
SHEET METAL and WIRE (stain-
less and carbon steel) fabrication
xc .Heli-arc and spot welding.
Expr'tl dev., design. Facilities for
m del making and pilot production.
N~rmandy 2-5585.

GENE SNIDER
. . . gets two hits

Michigan Linksters Hold
Third Place in Title Meet

,.

v

Special to The Daily

IOWA CITY - After 36 holes
of golf, the Michigan linksters
hold number three slot in the Big
Ten Meet with a team total of 773,
just 13 strokes shy of Ohio State's
leading 760.
Wisconsin, taking 769 strokes, is
second. Third-place Michigan is
trailed by Iowa with 775; Purdue
and Michigan State are tied with
784; Minnesota, 785; Illinois, 793;
Northwestern, 807; and Indiana
trails the pack with 823.
Low man for the Wolverines was
John Law who shot 73-76-149 on
the New Finkbine course. Team-
mates John Shubeck, Steve Uze-
lac and Fred Micklow were next
in line - Shubeck carded a 78-76-
154; Uzelac, 78-76-154; and Mick-
low, 73-81-154.
Sophomore Pat Keefe turned in
an 80-82-162 performance and
S t a n Kwasiborski's 87-77-164
score was discarded since only the
five lowest scores are used in team
totals.
Campbell Shares Lead
Purdue's Joe Campbell, defend-
ing champion shared yesterday's
medalist honors with Ted Katula
of Ohio State and Ted Hadley of
Minnesota with 148 totals, four
over par.
Michigan's Law is third with
BIKE
STORAGE
for summer
Campus Bike
514-16 E. William

149 in the individualist scramble.
Shubeck, Uzelac and Micklow oc-
cupy the 12th berth with 154.
Clear skies and sunshine were
on hand for yesterday's action.
The greens were hard and ex-
tremely fast and gave everyone a
rough time. Medalist Campbell
had his troubles wth them all day
as he encountered five three-put
greens.
The quest for the Big Ten golf
crown is still pretty tight. With
only 15 strokes between the first
and fourth place teams, the out-
come is a toss-up.
1.

,/ i

Id

(S

for
Graduation
GIVE A PIPE
PIPE W CENTER
118 East Huron - Opposite County Bldg.

Come

to Church

Sunduy

[+

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL &
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Arthur D. Zillgitt, Student Assistant Pastor
Paul R. Eberts, Minister to Students
SUNDAY PROGRAM
10:15 A.M. Student Guild Coffee Hour
10:45 A.M. Worship Service. Sermon Topic: "Ask
and Ye Shall Receive" by Walter S. Press.
3:00 P.M. Student Guild Picnic.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director.
Res. Ph. NO 5-2665;"Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 Morning Service
7:00 Evening Service
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. Sunday Morning Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday, Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street. Reading room hours are: Mon-
day 11:00 A.M. to 8:30 P.M. Tuesday - Sat-
urday 11:00 A.M. to 5 P.M, Sunday 2:30 to
4:30 P.M.

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Major League Standings

2/3 of
(it s a typographical error
but show no mercy ! ),
on hundreds of
GOOD B tOOKS
from regular stock

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct.
Chicago 20 8 .714'+
Cleveland 19 11..633
New York 18 12 .600
Detroit 17 16 .515
Boston 17 16 .515
Kansas City 14 19 .424
Baltimore 1? 18 .400
Washington 9 26 .257

GB
2
3
51,
5j
8%
9
14%

Yesterday's Results
Detroit at Kansas City, rain
New York 8, Washington 1
Boston 4, Baltimore 3
Cleveland 4, Chicago 3
Today's Games
Washington at New York - Ramos
(3-2) vs. Shantz (3-1)
Detroit at Kansas City (N) - Foy-
tack (3-2) vs. Duren (0-3)
Chicago at , Cleveland - Donovan
(2-1) vs. Wynn (5-3) f
Boston at Baltimore - Porterfield
(0-1) vs. Loes (3-3)

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct GB
Cincinnati 23 11 .676 -
Milwaukee 19 11 .633 2
Brooklyn 19 11 .633 2
Philadelphia 17 13 .567 4
St. Louis 14 17 .452 7Y/2
New York 14 19 .424 8,
Chicago 9 19 .321 11
Pittsburgh 8 22 .267 13
Vesterday's Results
Philadelphia 7, Pittsburgh 3
Chicago 5, Milwaukee 1
Brooklyn 6, New York 0
St. Louis 9, Cincinnati 6
Today's Games
New York at Brooklyn - Miller 0-1
or Worthington 3-3 vs. Drysdale, 3-0.
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia - Kline
0-5 vs. Haddix 2-3
St. Louis at Cincinnati (N) -
Schmidt 2-1 vs. Lawrence 4-1 or Nux-
hal 1-1.
Milwaukee at Chicago - Buhl 2-1
vs. Kaiser 1-1.

I

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William StreetsL
Rev. Leonard A. Parr, Minister.
Church School and Junior Church at 10:45 A.M.
Public worship at 10:45. Sermon by Dr. Parr, "On
Being Alive."~
Student Guild will meet at Guild House at 5:30 for
a picnic outing and outside Vespers.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister.
10:45 A.M. Morning Worship
Sermon: "Our Low Standard of Living"
9:45 A.M. Church School
The CONGREGATIONAL and DISCIPLES
STUDENT GUILD
5:30 P.M. Picnic Outing. Meet at the Guild
House.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Merrill P. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl, William
B. Hutchison, Eugene A. Ransom, ministers.
9:30 A.M. - 10:30 A.M. Seminar Groups.
9:00 A.M. & 10:45 AM. Worship Services. Ser-
mon: "When Prayer Becomes Power" by Dr.
Abbey.
2:00 P.M. Picnic Outing. Campbell's Cottage
and Barton Pond.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
Henry Kuizenga, Minister
Wm. S. Baker, Campus Minister
Patricia Pickett, Assistant
SUNDAY
Worship Services 9:00 A.M., 10:30 A.M., 12 noon
11:30 A.M., Grad Coffee Hour, Lewis Room.
3:30 and 5:30 P.M. Meet at the Student Center
for the SENIOR PICNIC to be held at the
Baker's
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State & Huron Streets.
William C. Bennett, Pastor.
10:00 Sunday School
1 1:00 Morning Worship
"Tests of Life" by Rev. Paul Beckwith
6:00 Student Guild
"The Unanswerable Question" by Homer Mom-
montree.
7:00 Evening Service
Wednesday - 8:00 - Prayer Meeting
WE WELCOME YOU!
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
' CHAPEL and CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Sunday at 9:15 and at 10:45: Worship Services,
with sermon by the pastor, "Brightening Life's
Barren Spots" (Holy Communion in the 10:45
Service)
Sunday at 3:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Leaves from Chapel for Outing and Pic-
nic Supper. (Also transportation leaving at 5)
Thursday at 7:30 P.M.: Ascension Day Vesper
Service, with sermon by the Rev. Harold Besel,
Asst. Chaplain, Univ. Hospital.
THE CHURCH OF C}HRIST
530 West Stadium
Sundays 10:00 A.M. - 11:00 A.M. - 7:30
P.M.
Wednesdays 7:30 P.M. Bible Study. .Minister,
Charles Burns.
Hear "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ ABC Net-
work Sundays 5:00 to 5:30 P.M.
For transportation to Service-Dial NO 3-5134.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
9:30 and 10.45 A.M. Meetings for Worship.
9:30 A.M. Young Friends Meeting.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. & S. Forest Ave.
Rev. Henry O. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday - 9:00 & 11:00 A.M.: Worship Services
10:00 A.M. Bible Study
7:0 P.M. Informal Lutheran Student Assn.
Meeting.
THE THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY IN
ANN ARBOR
New Quarters: 106 East Liberty, 2ND FLOOR
Listen to Radio Theosophy: Sundays, 12:15 P.M.
WPAG (1050 kc)

I

V.

HURRY.

Patterson To Fight Jackson
In New York's Polo Grounds

He Who Hesitates is Lost

NE W YORK (R) - Floyd Pat-

has been found guilty of monop-I

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
r .lr A . ~.... ..r.. 3 ..meE I .. A ki

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