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May 24, 1957 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-05-24

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Fro 197

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

)AN ALEXANDER:
Actress Calls 'Witness' Favorite Role

By DIANE FRASER
Radio and TV actress Joan Al-
exander claims that her part in
the Drama Season production
"Witness for the Prosecution" is
her favorite role.,
After five years with the TV
panel show "The Name's the
Same," Miss Alexander starred in
the New York production of "Wit-
ness for the Prosecution" last year.
She is repeating her role in the
Agatha Christie mystery for Ann
Arbor audiences.
"It's strange to sit down here
for a change," the dark-haired
actress commented as she took a
seat in the empty Lydia Mendels-
sohn theatre. "I really hate to
talk about myself I'd much rather
just talk about you."
Background? Miss Alexander
settled back to answer this stock
question.
First Broadway Role
"When 16 years old I walked
into a producer's office and he
gave me a job in a Broadway play.
I was just lucky," she remarked.
After her first important assign-
ment in Leslie Howard's produc-
tion of "Hamlet," she spent a year
studying in England under the
German director Fritz Kortner.
Miss Alexander was offered a
lead in a radio series after appear-
ing in "Trojan Women." "I was
very young and tempted by the
money that radio offered, and the
theatre seemed insecure - so I
took the lead."
Success in Radio, TV
A long career of radio and TV
successes followed. She thinks the
variety of parts is what makes
radio so wonderful.
"I havewdone as many as eight
shows a day," she said, recalling
that in' one day she played a
12-year-old girl, a crying baby and
an 80-year-old woman.
Comparing TV and the theatre,
the actress finds the theatre "in-
finitely more rewarding. In TV
you have to guess at the audience
response while in the theatre the
audience reaction determines your
performance," Miss Alexander
pointed out.
Can Vary Peiformance
"If the audience is unreceptive
in the theatre, you attempt to win
them over; if an actor playing op-
posite you is slow, you try to step
up the pace - an actor must be
able to vary the performance de-
pending on the audience and sur-

Job Bureau
Assists 'U'
Placements
Summer may mean leisure to
some, but to at least 3,300 Univer-
sity students it means a chance to
earn extra money.
This is the number of students,
who have already received summer
jobs through Ward D. Peterson,
chief of summer placement for the
University Bureau of Appoint-
ments and Occupational Informa-
tion.
Peterson is the head of probably'
the most extensive placement serv-
ice run by any college in the coun-
try. Started in 1950, it has oper-
ated on a large scale since 1955.1
The number of students who
benefit by its services has doubled
in the last three years.
Summer jobs mean almost con-
stant work for Peterson. As early
as November he begins sending
letters to various camp and resort
owners and businessmen, asking
if they need help during the sum-
mer months, and what qualifica-
tions they require for their em-
ployees,
Then begins the round of stu-
dent meetings, starting in mid-
December and continuing, every
Wednesday, through the end of
May. At these meetings, available
jobs are listed according to states.
Camps, in addition, are separated
according to whether or not theyl
are coed.
According to Peterson, the most
popular jobs are those in resorts.!
Many positions remain open for
this summer. Five hundred camps
are still in need of counselors, and
other industries' are requesting
help in both technical and non-
technical posts.
Salaries for University-placed
employees run within the average
for each position. A normal camp
salary, for instance, is $200 for
eight weeks, with room and board
included.

Center Plans
Niagara Trip
The International Center is
sponsoring a trip to Niagara Falls
between the end of this semester's
final exams and the start of the
summer session, according to
Helen Tjotis of the International
Center.
The 'trip will cost each of the
25 participating interrnational
students ten dollars, she said.
The trip will go from Ann Arbor
to Cleveland, Buffalo, Niagara
Falls and Chatam Ontario and
then return to the University. It
will last from June 16 to June 19.
Miss Tjotis emphasized that the
only exchange students with mul-
tiple entry visas can make the trip.
Students interested in going on
the trip can contact Miss Tjotis in
Rm. 18 of the International Cen-
ter.
Chaplains Ali
Many Worries
Religion, love and marriage are
the three main problems college
students bring to their chaplains
for help in solving, according to a
report recently presented at the
University.
The report was given by Robert
Bonthius, Vassar College chap-
lain, at the 10th annual confer-
ence of the National Association
of College and University Chap-
lains.
Findings were based on a sur-
vey of 50 college chaplains, about
one-fifth of all those now serving
in this capacity.

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-Daily-Irv Henrickson
FAVORITE ROLE-Joan Alexander claims her part in the Drama
Season production "Witness for the Prosecution" is her favorite
role. The radio and TV actress recently finished five years with
the TV panel "The Name's the Same."

roundings," she explained. "Every
performance should be slightly in-
spirational and bring something
new to it.
"TV can't be as creative or give
the actor as much freedom as the
theatre because of the time ele-
ment," she continued. "You must
constantly watch the clock on TV
-or the toothpaste ad won't be
shown!"
TV Helps Drama
TV will help people to become
more selective of drama, exposing
them to new ideas and actors. This
will raise the standard of drama,
she predicted.
Miss Alexander has had several
years' experience in summer stock.
Folklore Society
Meets Monday
Folklore Society will hold its
next meeting on Monday, May
27, 7:30, in Rm. 3G of the Union.
All members are requested to at-
tend the meeting.

She called summer stock a won-
derful experience for young people.
"You are part of the whole pro-
duction, painting sets, directing
and playing all imaginable kinds
of parts. You live and breathe and
eat theatre all summer," the act-
ress recalled.
In her offstage role of wife and
mother, the star claims she's very
lucky. She and her husband, a
Volkswagon distributor, live in
New York City with their two
children.
Expressing a warm interest in
Ann Arbor, Miss Alexander added

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FO WLER'S
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SPEEDY DELIVERY
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DELIVERIES MADE EVERY HOUR
From 7:30 P.M. to 11 :30

7th to 16th PRIZES
(RCA Hi-Fi sets-MARK IV).
JAMES MARTIN
Univ. of Detroit
DONALD Y. DAVIS
Univ. of Florida
T. NEIL DIVINE
Mass. Institute of Tech;
JANE SPAETH
Middlebury Coll., Vt.
WILLIAM T. SMELSER
Univ. of California
HAROLD I. LEVINE
Univ. of Chicago
RAMON JIMENEZ
U.C.L.A.
CHARLES HAMBURG
Temple Univ., Pa.
PETER S. HOCKADAY
Yale, Conn.
PETER OSTRANDER
ColumbiaUniv., N. Y.
17th to 36th PRIZES
($100 Brooks Brothers
wardrobe certificates)
JOHN L. NEFF
Univ. of Washington
ROXANA ALSBERG
Nat. Coll. of Ed., Illinois

LARRY A. BARON
M. I. T.
RICHARD A. HUGHES
Lehigh Univ., Pa.
LESLIE KERT
Univ. of Michigan
JEROME H. WISEMAN
' Temple Univ., Pa.
EDGAR W. SCHULZ
North Dakota Agric. Coil.
CHARLES M. ROSENBLATT
Columbia Univ., N. Y.
MARVIN RAY LENZ
Texas University
ELIOT GLASSHEIM
Wesleyan Univ., Conn.
DEAN NEHER
Univ. of Kansas
LEON ZUKROW
Marquette Univ., Wis.
PETER AVAKIAN
M. I. T.
G. L. JORDAN
Texas A. & M.
DENNIS A. JOHNSTON
Grinnell Coll., Iowa
J. S. WESKE
Harvard Univ., Mass.
GILBERT SHAPIRO
Columbia Univ., N. Y;
MANER L. THORPE
Univ. of California
MAURICE DANIHER, JR.
Univ. of Illinois
BERNON F. MITCHELL
Stanford Univ., Cal.

ROBERT G. FESSLER
Duke Univ., N. C.
JOHN BIENFANG
Univ. of Colorado
PHILIP R. PRYDE
Amherst Colt., Mass.
CARL G. WEISENFELD
Columbia Univ., N. Y.
GAIL SLAYBAUGH
Mount Holyoke Coll., Mass;
ROBERT VONDRASEK
Univ. of Colorado
GEORGE R. BEDELL
Columbia Univ., N. Y.
FRED TOWNSEND
Lehigh Univ., Pa.
ROGER J. SMITHE
,Univ. of Michigan
STANLEY WOJCICKI
Harvard Univ., Mass
WARREN R. BROWN
Lehigh Univ., Pa.
DON L. BEARD
Yale Univ., Comb;
ROBERT MALEC
Univ. of Chicago
HUNTER WILSON
U.C.L.A.
DAVE VANTREASE
Washington State ColL, Wash.
BILL BUCHAN
Washington State Coll., Wash;

ROBERT ARZT
M. I. T.
DOOLEY SCIPLE
Cornell Univ., N. Y.
DAVID M. BLOOM
Columbia Univ., N. Y.
WILLIAM W. BUCKLEY
Univ. of California
ROBERT LUITTON
Univ. of Washington
LAWRENCE J. BUGGE
Marquette Univ., Wis.
GARY LEE SMITH
Univ. of Minnesota
FREDERIC J. MASBACK
Syracuse Univ., N. Y.
KARL J. WETZEL
Georgetown Univ., Washington, D. ta
WILLIAM A. McCOMB
Michigan State Univ.
CLIFFORD T. STEWART
Denver University
GILBERT D. MEAD
Univ. of California
WILLIAM L. EARLEY
Univ. of Illinois
HOWARD A. GUTZMER
San Diego State Coll., Cat
EVE COFFIN
Colorado A & M CoIlt
STEPHEN P. HILL
Stanford Univ., CaL,
DONALD DuBOIS
U.C.L.A.
VELLO ERILANE
M. I. T.
STEPHANIE SCHWARZ
Smith Coil., Mass.
PAUL W. SMITH
Univ. of Oklahoma
WAIWIT BUDDHARI
Univ. of California_
ROBERT J. McRA
Montana State Univj
JOHN GILLIGAN
Marquette Univ., Wim~
JAMES C. POPE
Univ. of California
ALBERT L. SALTER
Univ. of California
GORDEN Y. S. WU
Princeton Univ., N.J.
JACK C. SCO'T'T
Texas A. & M. Coll.

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