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May 23, 1957 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-05-23

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THURSDAY, MAY 23, 1957

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THRM

THURSDAY, MAY 23, 1957 THE MICHiGAN DAILY PAflK rnuwu

4.A6liY i.itlli'i rI

Cl-Cvnmeit t
BY JIM BAAD
Fisher's Problems
ABOUT THIS TIME I'm glad I'm not Ray Fisher. Michigan's ven-
erable old baseball coach must feel just a bit anxious with his
hopes and problems of this coming weekend.
First of all, and most immediate, is the coming three game
series with Michigan State, always our most tenacious rival in every
sport. The Wolverines need these games if Fisher's hope of winning
his 16th Conference title is to be realized.
Another major problem is the surprise handed Fisher two days
ago in the form of Al Sigman's ineligibility. Sigman had been adding
a lot lately to Michigan's heavy-hit-not-much-pitch winnng combi-
naton and his loss will be felt in at least two respects. He was hitting
at a .323 pace in the Conference, plus being a constant long ball
threat with all his power. Also, his experience would have been es-
pecially important in this last clutch series.
Fisher will be replacing him with sophomore Ralph Hutchings,
rated a fine ballplayer, but lacking that confidence which the big
right fielder had gained from two seasons of football and nearly two
of baseball. To Sigman, these games would have been just three
more to win; to Hutchings, in his position as a replacement, they're,
games not only to win, but they can't help but be ones in which he
feels extra pressure to perform well. Confidence, too, is a factor.
Sigman knew what to expect in Big Ten baseball; it's all pretty new
to Hutchings.
4, * * *
NAA Check-up ...
IE ACTION on Sigman seemed to come out of nowhere, but was
in reality preceded by a seemingly routine check. The NCAA had
all schools turn in lists of their ball players which they then turned
over to the National Association of Professional Baseball Leagues for
a check on any possible signing of contracts. Sigman's name ap-
peared on the 1950 list and that, was it.
The ruling is highly consistent with NCAA policy as Sigman did
put his name on the dotted line of a professional contract. From the
standpiont of practicability, however, it seems rather inconsistent.
Athletes playing in post season bowl games get certain concessions
that make these participants much more "professional" than Sigman
was when he worked out three days with a Class D ball club and g1t
nothing for it. Yet Sigman's play in the Blue-Gray game didn't dis-
qualify him from baseball.
Out to the Park . .
A NYWAY, Sigman is all through and the baseball team will have
to 'playthis last crucial home series without him. Incidentally,
the first one-third of the series will be Michigan's last home appear-
ance. It will also be the last appearance of seniors Ken Tippery,
Glen Girardin, Bruce Fox, Ernie Myers, Jim Vukovich, Jim Clark
and Don Poloskey before the home fans. Attendance has been poor
this year at baseball games, partly because of the weather.
Here's a hope that more fans will come out to see the clamb
with State. All the excitement of baseball will be there, intensified
by the rivalry. There's nothing like a partisan crowd to make a
team stronger when a do-or-die situation is at hand. So far the base-
ball players have been deprived of this support of numbers. Tomor-
row it would be appreciated more than ever in getting off to a win-
ning start. No amore can be said. It's up to the Michigan fans.

1Net Squad Defends
Conference Title Today

By PAUL BORMAN
This morning at Evanston, Ill.,
Michigan's tennis team will begin
to defend its Conference cham-
pionship against nine title-hungry
teams.
Coach Bill Murphy has selected
almost the same team which won
last year's meet to play for Mich-
igan this year. The only exception
is sophomore Jon Erickson who
has broken into the starting line-
up at fourth singles.
Otherwise, the rest of the net-
ters-Barry MacKay, Mark Jaffe,
Captain Dick Potter, John Harris
and Dale Jensen - all partici-
pated in last year's meet.
MacKay, Jaffe, Potter and Har-
ris all emerged from last year's
meet with titles in each of their
singles divisions while the Mac-
Kay-Potter doubles team also
swept to Conference laurels.
The Wolverines are favored by
all the experts to retain their
championship. There is even -a
chance that they might sweep to
victory in every match.

This feat hasn't been accom-
plished by any Big Ten net squad
since a University of Chicago
team, starring Chet and Bill Mur-
phy turned the trick in 1939,
In Conference meets, the net-
ters aren't seeded. Their names
are picked out of a hat and any-
one is likely to meet anyone.

Therefore, as an example, if
MacKay should meet Iowa's Art
Andrews inl the first round and
lose to , Michigan would not
receive t ; points.
Tournament points are awarded
according to how far the netman
goes in the tournament.
The meet will continue through
Friday and Saturday.

'
.. .
k
$1

'SHAGGST

,**

-Daily-Charles Curtiss
MARK JAFFE
... hopes to repeat

'CATS COULD CLEAN

UP .

Baseball Race Confused

The muddled-up Big Ten base-
ball season moves into its last
weekend brace of games with the
top seven teams having a chance
to win the crown.
Even a sweep of its three game
series with Michigan State would
not assure Michigan the title.
Should Northwestern take its one
game with Illinois and two games
with Purdue, it would have a 7-2
mark good for a .778 percentage.
Michigan's mark after three wins
over MSU would be 10-3 or .761.
The rest of the possibilities are
too numerous to go into.
Adding to Coach Ray Fisher's
woes, of course, is the Al Sigman
suspension.
Fisher plans to give Jim Dickey,
number two catcher, and Jack
Lewis, a chance at Sigman's out-

field post. This is necessitated by
his plan to start John Herrnstein
on the mound tomorrow. Ralph
Hutchings will take over center
field.
Dbelts Down
LCA, 8-2,
In IM Pla
Delta Tau Delta blasted Lamb-
da Chi Alpha, 8-2, in the "A" first
place semifinals of fraternity I-M
softball.
Cal Haywood pitched a three-
hitter, struck out 10 and walked
three to win the game.
Sigma Alpha Mu advanced to
the finals of "B" softball when
they downed Pi Lambda Phi, 12-3.
SAM jumped off to a six run first
inning and then coasted the rest
of the way to victory. Al Kalt, the
winning pitcher gave up no walks
and struck out none.
In other games, Alpha Tau
Omega advanced to the finals of
the third place "A" playoffs by
beating Chi Phi, 7-2. They will
meet Sigma Chi in the finals who
edged Phi Sigma Delta, 3-2.

11

12

SIX TEAMS IN CONTENTION:
Bi Ten Golf Meet Looks Wide Open
yv AL JONES !

s
h
v 1'
M n
i
t. ...
I

F

A wide open, meet is in store for
the golf fans in Iowa City this
weekend when the Big Ten
schools vie for the Conference
links championship.
In the words of Michigan Coach
Bert Katzenmeyer, "It's going to
be a six-team dog-fight. Only four
of the Big Ten squads can be
counted out of the meet, and any
of the other six has the potential
to win."
c. If a top contender has to be
picked, it would be the strong Pur-
due contingent that won last year.
They are still paced by Joe Camp-
bell, the defending Big Ten med-
alist, and a top amateur golfer
nationally.
The Boilermakers have good
depth, and have beaten all oppo-
nents this spring except Michigan
and Ohio State, two weeks ago in
Major League
Standmn s
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pet. GB
Chicago 20 7 .741 -
Cleveland 18 11 .621 3
New York 17 12 .586 4
Detroit 17 16 .515 6
Bostonl 16 16 .500 61,
Kansas City 14 19 .424 9
Baltimore 12 17 .414 9
Washington 9 25 .265 141
Yesterday's Scores
Baltimore 4, Detroit 3 (10 innings)
Kansas City 8, Washington 6
Chicago 8, New York 4
Boston 11, Cleveland 0
# Today's Games
No games scheduled
NATIONAL LEAGUE

Ann Arbor. On two other occa-
sions they were able to down the
Wolverines and Buckeyes.
Following Purdue, five teams
rank abos;t even. Besides Ohio
State and Michigan, Wisconsin,
Iowa and Michigan State are very
much in the running.
Could Oust Campbell
The Buckeyes are paced by Ted
Katula and Fritz Schmidt, two
very capable performers, who
could possibly oust Campbell for
medalist honors. They also hold
a two-to-one advantage over
Michigan in dual meets this sea-
son.
Wisconsin and Iowa are two
squads that Michigan hasn't
viewed yet this spring, but Kat-
zenmeyer finds good reason to
fear both of them. Wisconsin has
two top performers in Jack Allen
and Roger Rubendall, while Iowa's
squad boasts some top amateurs
in Frank Judish, Herble lont2,
and John Marschni.
Hawkeyes Have Advantage
The Hawkeyes utll also have the
advantage of their home course
for the meet, which will consist
of 36 holes on both Friday and
Saturday.
Michigan State seems to have
achieved the role of the dark horse
in the Conference race.
Since falling to Michigan, Pur-

I

due and Ohio State three weeks
ago, the Spartans have shot some
phenomenal scores, and seem to
be ready to surprise the Confer-
ence when they arrive in Iowa
City.

I

0uf'A0WHATEVER
DIRECTION YOU
ARE HEADED IN..
FIRST STOP AT

11

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10

AGUA
U---,",

a,,, EEL ERR

Vi, %Zcr ge Fn *1z e

maimissiseminuma

W L I

Pct

Cincinnati 22 10 .68E
Milwaukee 19 10 .655
Brooklyn 18 11 .621
Philadelphia 16 13 .557
St. Louis 13 16 .448
New York 14 18 .43
Chicago 8 19 .296
Pittsburgh 8 21 .276
Yesterday's Scores
Pittsburgh at St. Louis (Ra
Milwaukee 4, Philadelphia 3
r (13 innings)
New York 4, Chicago 3
Cincinnati 8, Brooklyn I

t.
8
2
s
7
16
'6

GB
2 !f
41,4
' ,.

ain)

I recall our first stop in Mexico City. I stepped from
the airplane, walked over to the nearest colorful native,
and said, "Hasta la vista, senorita. (Good morning, sir.)
gPero las lastimas y calimadades se agravaban mas y mas
cada dia?" (Has thy footman finished sweeping out thy
chamber?)
"No, sir," he replied in Spanish. "He is an idle rogue.",
"How is thy footman called?" I asked.
"He is called Diego," replied any friend, "and the little
daughter of his fat sister is called Juanita. She has two
small books, one gray cat, three black dogs, 24 red
chickens, one fat pig, eight pewter mugs, and a partridge
in a pQar tree."
"Wilt thou have a Philip Morris cigarette?" I asked.
"Gracious," he said thankfully.
We lit Philip Morrises and smoked contentedly the
better part of the day,
"Perhaps by now my footman shall have finished sweep-
ing my chamber," he said. "Wilt thou not come to my
house?"
"Gracious," I said.

The WEEJUN
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For Men - Black, brown, Cordovan
and in black or tan
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(See the New Dress Loafer with the
Longer tongue and narrower toe)
Women's $10.50-- Men's $13.50 & up

Today's Games
St. Louis at Cincinnati
only game scheduled
PLAY
GOLFCOURSE

SCOTCH GRAIN SPORTOCASIN
Our most popular shoe and in both
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