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May 19, 1957 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-05-19

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157 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE I

IWWITH A ROAR ...
EYES ON FASHIONS Sue Arno

id Speaks on League, SGC, Future

A I.L A.E- cL4 1 VJ.7

r..'

By NANCY VERMULLEN
Whether the password be "Fill 'er up," "All aboard," or "Ship
Ahoy," coeds will soon be laying aside books and picking up suitcases
to start on their summer vacations.
By Car... .
When traveling by car, wear dark-colored clothes in sturdy ma-
terials like denim knd canvas. A full skirt is always practical, topped
with a blouse or sweater as the weather requires.
If the weather is veryhot, you may find it most comfortable to ride
in shorts. Many shorts are being shown with attractive matching skirts
to slip on when stopping to eat on the road.
Portable beauty aids are a boon to the road-traveler. Everything
from stick colognes to dehydrated washcloths are available to make
your trip by car more pleasant. Travel kits are being shown, and some
even have fold-up slippers and plastic hangers with clothespin attach-
ments.
For a pickup before you stop on the road, dab your face with skin
freshener, retouch your makeup and put on cologne. Also be sure to
wear sun glasses, a scarf and sun cream if you are riding in a con-
vertible.
By Train ...
r If your summer plans include a trip by train, choose a tailored
outfit including hat, gloves, stockings and heels. Since you'll be sitting
much of the time, your clothes should be comfortable and crease-
resistant.
If the suit you wear to board the train has a straight skirt, you
can put both the skirt and jacket in your suit case to save for a neat
arrival' and match your blouse with a full skirt for the trip.,
For sleeping sitting up in a coach, slacks and slippers are a "must."
However, if you have regular sleeping accommodations, a nightgown or
pajamas are in order, plus a robe for trips to the ladies' room.
Most train cases have their own cosmetic pockets, so stick all your
beauty props inside them. Besides the necessary toothbrush and tooth-
paste, it's wise to include'skin-freshener to quick-cleanse your face
during the dusty train ride.

By ELIZABETH ERSKINE
Last month, a coed who couldn't
build sand castles or make a kite,t
but who won a 6th grade contest
for having the biggest smile step-
ped out of campus office.,
Ex-League President Sue Ar-
nold, '57Ed, has kept the smile-
four and one-half inches worth-
and added to it an ability to get
things done and a personal touch
in all relationships that has made
her one of the most capable
League leaders in recent years.
"As president of the League,'
Sue says, "I gained a deeper in-r
sight into the University and its
problems-"
prob -e League Serves All
The vivacious dark-haired coed
from Glencoe, Ill. points out "Thev
League serves not only women' but SUE ARNOLD
the entire University through its.SUEARNO D
diverse social' program." .."ast League president
After leaving office Sue directed by Katharing Gilbran," added an-
Kappa Kappa Gamma skit for other close friend.
Skit Night. Reflecting on it, she More recently Sue helped her
says, "I must be jinxed. I've 6th grade class at University
directed two skits for Spring School where she practice teaches,

She added-again with a smile
--, "I think my relationship with
its members will contribute great-
ly to my future life. The experi-
ence was very valuable and I
hope. rewarding."
Extensive Traveling
Sue transferred to the Univer-
sity, after her freshmnan year at
Smith College. For two months in
the summer of 1954 she toured
eight European countries as a
member of the Smith European
Tour Singers.
On family trips and with the
Smith tour, Sue, who "loves to
travel any place any time," has
seen about 40 states and 10 foreign
countries.
"In fact I celebrated my 12th
birthday in a Cuban night club,"
she laughed. "My father was there
on a law case and mother and I
tagged along."
"The place I most want to go
now is the Bahamas," she declares
enthusiastically. "I'd like to hear
the real calypso music. Actually,
I like all kinds of music except
hillbilly and rock-and-roll. They're
not deep; music should be expres-
sive."

Daily-Leonard Cyr
GALENS' CHILDREN'S WORKSHOP . . Dabbling in finger
paint is fun for this youngster at University Hospital.
r CC idrenj'Of S p
's Workshop
rov esRecreati on

w1
By ELEANOR GOLD BERG
\ Away from the atmosphere of
nu r s e s, doctors and operating
rooms, the Galens' Children's
Workshop provides a place for re-
laxation and education for those
who would ordinarily lead a dull
withdrawn hospital existence.
Here children between the ages
of eight and 13 can forget prob-
lems and pain as they play and
work with others like themselves
At first, this University Hospita
workshop seems like any grade
school. A second glance reveal
post-polio cases, youngsters who
have been badly burned and vic-
tims of nephrosis, a serious kidney
inflamation, or unhealed fractures
Study Means
Several children in wheelchairs
beds or tractions are studying with
text- books, craft materials and
films. Others dabble in finger
painting or metal work, making
identification bracelets.
Several animals, including a
coati mundi also help to accupy
the long hours for the youngsters
A small boy, paralyzed from th
waist up by polio, is learning to
replace useless hands with his feet
through craft work. He is quite
adept with finger paints.
Weekly Picnic
A weekly picnic held during the
summer months, aids those with
diet difficulties.
Burned children, who ordinarily
regress, are "brought out" by the
extensive work of teachers devoted
to each youngster personally, says
teacher Gloria Dietrich.
Mrs. Dietrich cited the case o
one youngster as an example of
"gratifying experiences." A young
boy with a paralyzed leg "hated to
lea e the workshop and return to
SHEET METAL and WIRE (stain-
less and carbon steel) fabrication
incl. Heli-arc and spot welding.
Expr'etl dev., design. Facilities for
. I model making and pilot production.
NOrmandy 2-5585.

school."'Now he is back and has
f had his leg amputated.
g "If it hadn't been for the shop,
s he wouldn't have been able to cope
- with this situation as well," she
e declared. Mrs. Dietrich pointed out
, that the workshop gives the chil-
dren the normal atmoshphere that
s they would not ordinarily have.
- School is held each weekday morn-
d ing. An afternoon craft program
. strives to meet the youngsters'
l emotional needs.
, The workshop, sponsored by
s Galens Honorary Medical Society,
o received its initiating'spark from
an annual party given for chil-
Y dren hospitalized during Christmas
. vacation.
Funds from the annual bucket
, drive, started in 1928, gradually
h exceeded the amount needed for
the party. The workshop was
r formed as a part of the hospital
g school program in 1931.
. Serves Large Area
a Subsequently, it came into its
own. In 1944 its first full time
. teacher was hired. Now it has de-
e veloped into quite a large 'area.
The shop is supported entirely
t by funds from the Galens' bucket
e drive, held during the Christmas
season, and by contributions from
alumni of Medical and Dental
schools. Last year's drive netted
S$8,900.
d 0 SYLVIA STUDIO
Qof DANCE -0
tf
f 'Classes it
o * KINDERDANCE
t * ACADEMIC BALLET
c Beginners to
Professionals
B TAP
* BALLROOM
a Phone NO 8-8066
525 EAST LIBERTY
L= =3-d== X=>04= i0=- o_

Weekend and both have lost,"
Despite the losses she was
awarded the "Kappa of the
Month" bracelet for May in recog-
nition of this and her many other
activities.
Sorority sisters also comment on
Sue's "happy and natural per-
sonality. Nothing seems to get
ner down," an ex-roommate de-
clared.
'Quote for Occasion'
"If something goes wrong she
always has a qgoe for the occa-
sion, usually from 'The Prophet'

write a musical comedy, "Around
the World with Music." Quips
Sue, "I'm sure they'll all be
Broadway stars some day."
Turning fairly serious again -
something the Mortarboard mem-
ber can do occasionally - Sue
had this to say about Student
Government Council: "SGC is
learning a lot, but still has a lot
to learn. The campus should be
tolerant of its youth and realize

I

Complete

3 1 3 S. State St.

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toned side slit. Pin5
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Sizes 7 through 15.
JOLLI -TOP $2.95
SHEATH SHORTS $3.

In a pleasant quandary
Shoufd she wear the skirt?
Should she wear the shorts?
The cotton blouse, of course,
goes with either one.
Pat takes the whole set for
week-ends away or for
any day on the Diag.
Cotton skirt in red-and-green plaid

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