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May 05, 1957 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-05-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


PAGE EIOIiT

A IKE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, Y 5,13;7

PAGE ETGWT THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, MAY 5,1957

HONDURAS-NICARAGUA:
f Border Struggle Laid
} To Dispute over Oil

-Photo Courtesy University News Service
ELECTROSIC SWITCHBOARD-MITAB, self-erasing blackboard
solves an efficiency problem for engineer Robert Machol, Grad., by
the simple twist of an ordinary telephone dial.
Electronic Brain Computes
Difficult Problems uIcdy

Inventors of MITAB (Mechani-
cal Transportation and Assign-
ment Blackboard) say this device
provides 20-minute answers to
problems larger electronic compu-
ters would take years to do the
"long way around."
MITAB was designed and built
by mathematicians and engineers
in the Operations Research group
of the University's Engineering
Research Institute for a bargain
price of $5,000.
It is described as a mechanical
blackboard that "erases itself" au-
tomatically but can restore the
problem as it was originally set up
if the operator wishes.
"Forgets" Instructions
Not a computer because it can-
not remember instructions, it can
only add, subtract and perform
other "simple" functions as finding
the best of two billion billion pos-
sible answers to a specific problem.
It was built by suggestion of
Merrill M. Flood, associate director
of ERI. James Munkres devised a
set of rules by which the machine
may solve a class of problems effi-
ciently and rapidly.
Actual construction was done by
engineers Bruce Weinert, Harold
Sherman .and Joseph Hoagbin,
mostly in their spare time, with
second hand equipment. Building

funds were supplied by the Engi-
neering Research Institute.
According to Robert Machol,
ERI systems engineer, the ma-{
chine has potential as a research
and instructional tool. Its solu-
tion methods can be adapted to
make conventional computers
even -more efficient.
MITAB has a great face con-
taining 400 indicators, 400 switch-
es and 800 lights. The indicators
are in twenty rows and columns,
solving a variety of combination-
permutation problems.
For instance, if 20 men had to do
20 jobs, and the rows represent
men and the columns, jobs; then
the machine can compute the
number of ways a business man-
ager can assign jobs (2,432,902,-
008,176,640,000). T h e problem
which the machine solves is finding
the best arrangement, using the
business manager's criteria-least
total cost and 'fastest operating
time.
Performs Tricks
It scan perform mathematical
tricks with its rows and columns,
solving problems in minutes that
a high speed computer would take
years to do.
However, if the high speed com-
puter is "shown the way" by MI-
TAB it could solve the problem in
seconds.

By DAVID TARR
Underlying the border dispute
between the Central American
countries of Honduras and Nicara-
gua is a jungle-land area thought
to contain oil.
This natural resource caused
fighting this week and has resulted
in the two countries' going before
the Council of the Organization of
American States, even though the
land dispute has been simmering
for some time.
Both Nicaragua and Honduras
had claimed the area for many
years before 1906 when King Al-
phonso. XIII of Spain awarded it
to the latter.
Ruling Unrecognized
Nicaragua does not recognize
that arbitrary ruling, but claims
the Spanish king had no legal jur-
isdiction to award it to Honduras,
and claims the area as her own.
Some fighting has occurred dur-
ing the week but inadequate and
conflicting reports make the situa-
tion today unclear.
Both countries seem prepared to
accept arbitration before the OSA
now that it has established a five-
man investigating committee. This
group has been sent to the troubled
arera,
Both countries have charged
each other with aggression before
the OSA Council. Honduras sent
a note Tuesday claiming Nicara-
gua had invaded the territory
awarded her (Honduras) in 1906.
Honduras is reported to have be-
gun her move to expel Nicaraguans
from the disputed area Wednesday
by capturing the small town of
Mocoron. This prompted Nicaragua
to brand Honduras the aggressor.
Intervention Asked
Both nations have asked inter-
vontion under the Western Hemis-
phere's collective security pact. On
Friday, Honduras asked invocation
of the Rio Pact, which allows col-
lective a c t i o n and sanctions
against hemisphere aggressors.
.O*A's Council decided the Pact
should be invoked although this
requires a meeting of foreign min-
isters of member nations.
The five-man committee estab-
lished to investigate the trouble is
intended, in part, to provide a
"cooling off" period between the
states, a method which has been
used in the past.
The collectivei4 security pact
among the 21 American republics
is now in its 10th year. It was last
used to prevent war in 1954.

j STATUUt Af
HONDURAS D d
Terato
NICARAGUA
anaqu~a
COSTA RKCA '
DISPUTED AREA
... oil resources
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)
Science Research Club, May meeting
in the Rackham Amphitheatre at 7:30
p.m. on Tues,, May 7. Program: "Fish-
eries Management," Paul H. Esch-
meyer - U. S. Fish and Wildlife; "Ex-

periments on the Neural Basis of Pat-
tern Vision, Robert W. Doty" - Physi-
ology. Election of officers. Dues for1
1956-57 accepted after 7:10 p.m. 1
Lectures
Correction to the Weekly Calendar:
The lecture sponsored by the Center
for Japanese Studies and the Depart-
ment of Far Eastern Languages and
Literatures will be held on Wed., May 8
instead of Tues., May 7 as announced
in the Weekly Calendar. Prof. Howard
L. Boorman, School of International
Affairs, Columbia University, will speak
on "China Under Communism and Its
Alliance with Russia" at 3:10 p.m. in
Aud. C, Angell Hall.
University Lecture in Journalism.
Thomas L. Stokes. Washington poli-
tical columnist for United Feature Syni-
dicate, will speak on "Big Government's
Challenge to the Press" on Mon., May
6 at 3:00 p.m. in the Rackham Amphi-
theatre.
Concerts
Sun., May 5, 2:30 p.m. Philadelphia
Orchestra; John Krell, piccolo; Gina
Bachauer, pianist; University Choral
Union in "Five Tudor Portraits"
(Vaughan Williams), with Martha Lip-
ton, contralto, and Donald Gramm,
bass-baritone; Thor Johnson, conduc-
tor.
Sun., May 5, 8:30 p.m. Philadelphia
Orchestra; Rise Stevens, soloist; Eugene
Ormandy, conductor.
The ticket office will be open in Bur-
ton Tower through Wed., May 2; and
the Hill Auditorium box office will be
open beginning Thurs., May 2, through
the Festival.
Academic Notices
Student Teaching in Elementary Edu-
cation. Applications for student teach-
ing for the fall semester 1957, are
available in Room 2509, University
Elementary School.
Astronomical Colloquium. Tues., May
7, 4:15 p.m., The Observatory. Dr. Anne
Underhill of the Dominion Astrophysi-
cal Observatory will speak on "The At-
mospheres of the O- and B-Type Stars."

Doctoral Examination for William
Carl Latta, Fisheries; thesis: "The Eco-
logy of the Smallmouth Bass, Microp-
terus D. Dolomieui Lacepede, at Wau-
goshance Point, Lake Michigan", Tues.,
May 7, 2122 Natural Science Building,
at 10:00 a.m. Chairman, K. F. Lagler.
Doctoral Examination for Alfred Ran-
dolph Bobrowsky. Engineering Mechan-
ics; thesis: "Extreme-Value Analysis
of Oscillations", Mon., May 6, 218 West
Engineering Building, at 3:00 p.m.
Chairman, J. Ormondroyd.
Doctoral Examination for Raymond
Arthur Popp, Zoology; thesis: "Com-
parative Metabolism of Blastocysts, Ex-
traembryonic Membranes, and Uterine
Endometrium of the Mouse with Ref-
erence to Interdependent Metabolic Ac-
tivities Occurring During Embryogeny,"
Mon., May 6, East Council Room, Rack-

ham Building, at 3:00 p.m. Chairman,
C. L. Markert.
Placement Notices
Beginning with Mon., May 6. the
following schools will be at the Bureau
of Appointments to interview for
teachers for the 1957-58 school year.
Mon., May 6
Roseville, Michigan -- Elementary
(Kindergarten, 1st, 2nd, 6th).
Tues., May?7.
Inkster, Michigan - (Dearborn Dis-
trict No. 8) - All Elementary; Eng-
lish; General Business; Speech Cor-
rection; Visiting Teacher; Elem. Art;
Elem. Music.
Vassar, Michigan --. All Elementary;
High School Art; English; Journalism/
English.
Gary, Utdlana* -- All Elementary;

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Math; Social Studies/English; Indus-
trial Arts; Librarian.
Fowlerville. Michigan - 4th Grade;
7th Grade Social Studies/Health; 8th
Grade History Social Studies/Assis-
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For additional information and ap-
pointments contact the Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3528 Administration Build-
ing, NO 3-1511, Ext. 489.

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