100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 10, 1957 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-02-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN. DAILY

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10,195?

PAGE EIGHT THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10. 1957

.... r . v ......., s ,.. .,..,.. .. .. .... ... , ... +.++w

Public Health Presents New Challenge to Authorities

COUZENS HALL SNACKBAR:
New Student Retreat Beckons

_,._

By RENE CAPPON3
Associated Press Newsfeatures Writer
Profound changes in America's
health picture over the past de-
cades are presenting public health
authorities with new challenges.
These are linked to such major,
factors as the steady, growthof
the . nation's population and im-
portant shifts in its makeup and
employment. Some scourges have
been virtually eliminated. The
accompanying chart, based on one
published in a recent U.S. Public
Health Service study, underscores
this development.
Communicable diseases, once
formidable killers, show a precipi-
tous decline on the mortality
charts. Noteworthy also is the
pronounced drop in the TB death
rate. At the same time, there
has been an increase in deaths
from such diseases as cancer, heart
afflictions, hypertension and ar-
teriosclerosis.
Steady Rise
Telling commentary on the gen-
eral advance in medical science
and public health is the steady
rise in the life expectancy of
Americans now pushing toward 70.
What this has meant - coupled
with the rising birth rate - is a
bigger population, and a popula-
tion with proportionately more
older people as well.
The PHS study, centered on
population trends relating to health
activities, had this to say:
"With the growing conquest of
communicable diseases, the fron-
tier of public health is in the
direction of preventing the kinds
of diseases and-lack of good health
that are bound up with the social
and economic world in which
people live and work."
It added:
"Every major change in ,opu-
lation has considerable impact on
the nature and emphasis of public
health programs, which are them-
selves an, important factor in pop-
ulation change. In our own time,
for example, public health pro-
grams have been largely respon-
sible for eliminating most of the
deaths in infancy and childhood,
and have thus affected the age-
composition of the population."
Changed Nation
In a postscript to the popula-
tion-health study, Dr. Halbert L.
Dunn, chief of the national office
of vital statistics, noted that
"within a few years we have
changed, as a nation, from the
rural ways to urban ways, from
the family-operated farm to the
impersonal factory or metropoli-
tan service industry.
"As a people subject to incessant
striving, many of us have become
uprooted from traditions, old
friends, and kin. The social situ-
ation of many of the aged . . . is
probably more conducive to illness
than to health. In these and other
facets of American life, it is rea-
sonable to expect varying degrees
of personal adjustment, and safe
to predict that many of the un-
adjusted will become ill or less
fit in the process."
He declared that public health

r

7S0O
Inn

-I-

I WOFl

T

4 ~ 4 ~ *la ' > ' --

i _ T _-_1

DEATHS FRAM SPEC/FIG. CAUSES,1900 19531

+ ,-

I

*
"-4r

Tl

1125 3

rvirl_.___.i.____ .;i; ' ' 1 ___;

Ai

~A.4' 4 - 4 -4- 4~1-di F~-5..-. I -

ANNUAL DEATHf

RATE PER 100,000 P01

650V

t

PULATION
HYPERTENSION AND
ARTERIOSCLEROSIS
1 5
S

4 - _ _
ACUTE INFECTIOUS DISEASES
SOn
D e EATDSS
= ~H ARTDSEE

24I

I-""M 4-.-

I__ __
zof ____
DIBES IS.- _ _
4 1 CIRRHOSIS OF LIVER{
I10 __
_6

I+

20d
/50
/io
5'®

A,

________ ,..I'i________CACE
>r gV,#lira r" JJMS

" - t

(STOMACH ULCER

V

1 * RHEUMATIC FEVER

21

-1

w A' ewsfeotures. TUEULOSIS , 9 12 014 30

/910o !!)___fI92o - 130 ._.1940 /95U

officials today are primarily faced
with a broad group of illnesses
prominently including "most of
the chronic and so-called degen-
erative diseases, as well as a great
range of more or less 'minor'
afflictions which are not tradi-
tionally in the domain of public
health but which reach substan-
tial totals."
In the latter group, Dr. Dunn
said, "are the annoying ailments
that puzzle both physician and
patient and that account for much
of the current fantastic boom in
'mood pills.'"
Organization
Notices
Use of this column is restricted to
OFFICIALLY REGISTERED student or-
ganizations. Registration forms are
available in the Office of Student Af-
fairs, 1020 Administration Building.
Registration for the current semester
should be completed not later than
March 2.
_* * *
Chess Club, regular meeting, Feb. 12,
7:30. Union.
* * *
Lutheran Student Association, sup-
per and meeting, Feb. 10, 6:00 p.m.,
Lutheran Student Center.
S* *
Michigan Christian Fellowship, Mr.
Stacey Woods, "The Authority of Je-
sus Christ," Feb. 10, 4:00 p.m., Lane
Hail.
Russian Circle, meeting, Feb. 11, 8
p.m., International Center.
University of Michigan Folk Dancers,
Organizational meeting, new members
welcome, Feb. 11, 7:30 - 10:00, Lane
Hall.
Contemporary Literature Club, Or-
ganizational meeting, everyone wel-
come, Feb. 11, 7:30 p.m., Room 3 A

Take one spacious room; add
as equal parts of men and women+
as possible; fold in a grill, some1
coffee pots, and a few booths;
add a pinch of music for spice1
and you have the ingredients for1
the Couzens Hall Snackbar.
Couzens Hall, home of nurses
in advanced training, opened the
Snackbar last spring, according
to Mr. Peter G. Collins, manager.
The Snackbar, accessible by go-
ing downstairs through the dor-+
mitory or by way of the sidewalk
leading from North Forest, be-1
hind the terraced Womens' Physi-
cal Education field, was con-
structed by the University in the
spring semester.
Open for Business3
A sign on the Snackbar's door
states the general rules for pa-
trons: "No studying; No card
playing; and , No feet on seats.
Rules for the personal appearance
of women "at all times" include
"No pajamas or robes; no curlers
without a scarf."
The spacious room, decorated in
yellows and greens 'with rose-col-
ored upholstered seats, is a refuge
for both students and hospital
personnel. An acoustical tiled ceil-
ing, green curtains, and recessed
lighting enhance the decor.
Breakfasts, lunches, dinners,
and snacks are served here 8:30
a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and from 7:30
p.m. to 12 midnight on weekdays,
with a closing time of 1:00 a.m.
on Fri. and Sat. and midnight on
Sun.
Lights Out
The fellas, however, are chased
from the Snackbar at 10:25 p.m.
throughout the week and are
evicted prior to the women's cur-
few on weekends also.
"It's interesting to see the girls
steal back down the stairs after
their dates have left," one coed
points out. On their return, they
devour hamburgers and malts
which they would not order in
deference to their dates' depleted
pocketbooks, she surmises.
"It's not as big as Club 600,"
says Mr. Collins, "but we think it
is better because it's more homey."
Collins served his apprentice-
ship- as an assistant manager at
the South Quad Snackbar before
taking over the managerial duties
at Couzens Hall.
In addition to Mr. Collins, the
Snackbar is staffed by.two women
throughout the day, but the bulk
of the help is made.up of women
who reside in the Hall.
Haven for Students
Above the drone of a juke box,
an incessant aura of chattering
pervades the atmosphere.
Besides serving as an ideal spotv
for coffee dates or idle conversa-
tion, the Snackbar provides a brief
respite from study for the Cou-
zens women and others.
-The incomparable hamburger is
a mainstay in the Snackbar's
menu, with coffee and lemonade
the chief thirst quenchers.
"It's too handy," was the only
complaint voiced by one coed.
"It's all right if you're not trying
to reduce."

in addition to being readily qc-
cessible, food is permitted to be
brought from the Snackbar, and
many food-laden t r a y s are
brought up to corridors of women
upstairs.
We "have quite a number of
take-out orders," said the man-
ager as he moved forward to fill
a coed's cup with steaming coffee.
Coffee Break
Medical students usually fre-
quent the Snackbar between 2:30
and 3:30 in the afternoon, says
Mr. Collins. "Coffee is the main
item between 9:30-10:30 p.m.,"
the congenial proprietor continues.
"We have five pots going, and
at this time they have to keep
going," he says with a twinkle in
his eye.
Besides a hot plate for coffee,
two grills, a French fryer, and
malted milk makers comprise the
equipment. A dish washing ma-
chine in an adjoining room dis-
poses of dirty dishes with minute
rapidity.
"Members of the hospital staff
don't have any other place to go"
before their own coffee bar opens
at 10:30 p.m., says Dr. Jerome
Strong. "It's pleasant and inex-
pensive," he sums up.
The Snackbar also caters to
parents and visitors of the dor-
mitory on weekends, when a large
number of meals is served.
So if its coffee, a break from
the drudgery of study, or a pleas-
ant place in which to gather and
talk, the Couzens Hall Snackbar
is a good place to know and to go.

I

1'°

ROUND TABLE DISCUSSION-No world-shaking problems being
probed here, for the Snackbar unfurrows students' brows in brief
moments of relaxation. The ratio at this table is not' exactly
typical, but who cares about being in the minority?

4;

f I

{

I

LET ME SEE-Ruth E. Budoff, '58N (at left) and Susan E,
Hausler, 160M, pensively survey the selections offered on the juke-
box as they try to find something besides Elvis.

Read and Use Daily Classifieds

RAIN WEAR-Just about any
dress from Bermudas to formals
is legitimate at the Snackbar,
but pajamas and robes are ta-
boo. A slicker makes an ideal
covering for pajamas, and no-
body will ever know, or will
they?

Story by
RON SCH ELKOPF
Photos by
CHARLES CURTISS

r

f

£

Looking for a Chance
TO GROW?
Take the First Step Today
SEE YOUR PLACEMENT OFFICER
for an INTERVIEW
with
BABCOCK&WILCOX
ON FEBRUARY 19
TUBULAR ATOMIC RESEARCH
DEGREES BOILER PRODUCTS REFRACTORIES ENERGY AND
D__________ IVISION DIVISION DIVISION DIVISION DEVELOPMENT
Mechanical Engineering x x x x x
Ceramics Engineering x x
Chemical Engineering x x x x
Civil Engineering x x
Electrical Engineering x x
Engineering Physicistsx x
Physicists xx
Fuel Technologists x x
Industrial Engineering x x x.
Metallurgical Engineering x x x x
Metallurgists x x x x
business Administration
and Engineering x x
Chemists x X,
Nuclear Engineering x x
Mathematics x x x
Background in any of the fields listed in the
left-hand column is all you need to begin your
career with B &W. Check the activities you
want to talk about with the B&W representative
when he's on your campus. He'll be glad to see
you.... and you'll be glad you talked to him.

4
I

I

Only Dietzgen Slide Rules
have these great features
Professional engineers say Dietzgen's new slide
rules embody the greatest advances in design in
more than a quarter century. Dietzgen's exclu-
sive Micromatic Adjustment permits perfect
alignment of the scales at all times. Simple re-
setting of one screw does it. The end plates need
not be loosened; fit and action of the slide is
never disturbed.
Dietzgen's automatic slide tension insures per-
fect slide action wherever and whenever these
rules are used. Slides cannot bind or stick-nor
become loose so errors may result from acci-
dental slide movement. These are truly great
slide rules. Important new scales added. New
super-safe carrying case. See them at your Dietz-
gen dealer today.

I

COMING UP - The women
workers, mostly residents of
Couzens Hall, are kept busy by
the voracious appetites and un-
quenchable thirsts of students,
medical personnel, and others
who populate the Snackbar.

A LATE SNACK-Even from the outside, the Couzens Hall Snackbar looks like a cozy place to sit,
sip coffee, or just plain gossip. A convenient location and cheery atmosphere are the prime products
the Snackbar offers, and the cost is very reasonable.

iiett's Mh
322 South

chian Store -,1er's, Inc.
State Street 336 South State Street

AN Xx

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan