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May 03, 1957 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-05-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAOX Z14GHT

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FRIDAY, MAY 3,1957

t

Non-University Jobs Provide Opportunity

By DIANE LABAKAS
Non - University jobs presently
provide students with the most
numerous job opportunities.
Those non-University jobs in-
clude such work as laboratory test-
ing and experiments, babysitting,
yard work, drafting, and cutting
grass.
Of 800 students who applied for
Work at the University Personnel
Office last semester, 200 were
placed in non-University jobs and
190 in University positions.
Non-University jobs are found
primarily in Ann Arbor, Ypsilanti,
Plymouth, and Whitmore Lake.
Married Students' Work
There are room jobs for mar-
ried students who want to be care-
takers and get rent free and other
students who get room free by
shoveling walks, cutting grass and
doing other odd jobs.
"Approximately 90 per cent of
the students whom we place put
in about 15-20 hours per week,"
W. P. Strong, peersonnel office
intereviewer, declared. He esti-
mated the base rate of pay a,-t
$1.25 per hour for most off -
campus Jobs.-
The basic procedure a student
follows in seeking work is to come
to the University Personnel Office
and fill out an application card,
specifying class schedule, previous
employment, amount of money he
expects to make and the amonut
of work and kind of job he wants.
Interview Next Step
The next step is an initial in-
terview where "the interviewer can
evaluate the student's background'
to see what kind of work he is
qualified for," Strong explained.
If there is a position open, the
student is given a referral slip
stating the employers' name and
telephone number. The employer
is eventually called after a while
for a report on the student's work.
There is no limit to the amount
of jobs a student can get, Strong
declared. He noted that approxi-
mately 75 per cent of the positions
available do not entail specific
skill or trade.
Women's Jobs Fewer
"Jobs for girls are less numer-
ous and lower paid than those for
boys," Strong said. Most of the
jobs for girls entailed library and
babysitting work.
"For every girl that is placed,
there are five boys placed," Strong
added.
Educators Meet
A Joint committee on research
business education comprised of
three national organizations will
meet at the University today and
Saturday.

College
Roundup

li

Colleges Have Greatest Accident Toll

SURPASS TRAFFIC FIGURES:

A

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A sophomore woman at the Uni-
versity of Oklahoma wouldn't take
"no" for an answer.
During her freshman year,
Mary Frances Fenton decided on
a career in medical illustration.
When she learned that the art
school offered no degree in that
field, she began cutting through
university red tape to establish
her intended field as an accredited
course.
Miss Fenton achieved her goal.
Upon graduation she will receive
a degree in information design.
* * *
Novice G. Fawcett was installed
eighth president of Ohio State
University this week.
More than 800 representatives
of colleges and universities at-
tended the inauguration.

i

By JANICE WILCZEWSKI
College students, beware.
The college campus Is the scene
of a greater accident toll than all
other student accidents in cars or

elsewhere off campus, making our
tree-shaded campus a bigger
booby trap for the student than
the roaring highway.
This report came from the Na-
tional Safety Council, which pre-
sented facts and figures startling
to those who regard a college cam-
pus as a symbol of traditional
tranquility and carefree living.
The Council, in conjunction
with the American College Health
Associataion, conducted accident
studies of 11 colleges and universi-
ties, including the University.
High Accident Toll
Adding up all the injuries to col-
lege students from athletics, lab-
oratory experiments, street cas-
ualties, and other campus hazards
presents an alarmingly high ac-
cidentstoll - and it is increasing,
the Council claims.
"The whole picture of collegi-
ate activity," the Council says,
"adds up to the fact that each
year one out of every nine stu-
I-

dents in American colleges and
universities receives injuries re-
quiring medical attention." The
ratio was one out of four at one
large university.
Last year, including the sum-
mer session, Health Service
treated 232 bone fractures. An un-
tabulated number of accidents
were also taken care of at the
University hospital and St. Jo-
seph hospital.
Director Reports Causes
Health Service also reported 25
concussions, 46 dislocations, and
17 animal bites during the school
period.
Dr. Morley Beckett, Director of
Health Service, cited street ac-
cidents as the main cause of cas-
ualties, Another common cause is
bites from laboratory animals,
stray dogs and squirrels.
Each new season brings with it
a rush on Health Service. The first
snowfall always is accompanied
by bruises, sprains and broken
limbs due either to icy streets and
sidewalks or tobogganing, skiing,
and skating accidents.
Spring Brings Accidents
In the early drys of spring,
horseback riding mishaps are fre-

quent. This time of year also en-
courages crazy students stunts,
supplying Health Service with
even more roomers.
Just this week, a boy attempted
to broad jump a wide hedge, and
landed in Health Service with a
sore leg.
Rarely thought of as a campus
hazard are the science laborato-
ries. So far this school year, five
students were overcome by mer-
cury vapor fumes. Chemistry labs
present a bi danger with numer-
ous glass breakages.
Many Campus Fires
facilities and equipment to col-
dents' home surroundings, is the
scen of more accidents than the
student sports car or jalopy.
One out of every 18 campuses
in the nation has a residence hall
fire each year, along with fires
in other buildings.
The mounting accident toll has
become so serious on the nation's
campuses, that college safety spe-
cialists, administrators and fac-
ulty members will meet at Purdue
University May 6-8 to discuss re-
duction of accidental deaths and
injuries to students and loss of

The college

leges.
The meeting, sponsored by the
Campus Safety Committee of the
National Safety Council, will fea-
ture talks on many phases of cam-
pus safety.

dOPmitort', the 8tu-

3

A

PERSONNEL INTERVIEW-W. P. Strong, University personnel
interviewer, talks to student seeking employment.

"We get all kinds of unusual
jobs," Strong remarked. "We've
had positions for magicians, peo-
ple to milk cows, and a business
executive who paid a girl $2 per
hour to show his daughter around
the University."
Strong said the best paid posi-
tions are those involving the most
skill such as a nuclear physics as-
sistant or draftsman.

Only about half of the students
who apply get jobs, Strong de-
clared, because those who do not
immediately get a job become dis-
couraged and do not come back.
He said that of those students
who came back, 90 per cent got
jobs and the other 10 per cent are
looking for specialized positions or
jobs the Personnel Office does not
have.
"We provide a good service at
the Personnel Office," Strong as-
serted, "but there are many stu-
dents who do not take advantage
of it.";

Students at the University of
Wisconsin participated in a poll
concerning social standards.
On the subject of cheating, one
sophomore claimed, "Well, I've
done some looking over my neigh-
bor's shoulder in moments of des-
peration, I'll admit, but as far as
calling cheating a custom ...
that's gross exaggeration."
One woman student claimed
that dormitory life changed her
ideas. "I lived with 25 people who
had 25 different opinions on re-
ligion, politics and society," which
changed her views on social be-
havior.

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