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April 23, 1957 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-04-23

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i

z, 1aZflx THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Orientation

Sixty-Five Years Ago .. .

Petitiohing
Begins Today.
New Program Includes
100 Women for Fall,
,Summer Period Plan
Freshmen, sophomore and jun-
ior coeds who wish to serve as
fall orientation leaders may get
petitions tomorrow through Mon-
day in the League undergraduate
office.
One hundred women from all
schools and colleges in the Univer-
sity will be selected for the Fri-
day, Sept. 13 to Wednesday, Sept.
18 orientation period. As in prev-
ious years leaders will have to be
at the University by Thursday,
Sept. 12.
Petitioners will be asked for
their opinion on what the job
entails and their qualifications for
it.
New Fall Program -
Fall orientation will follow a
new program set up this year by
a four-member Orientation Study
Committee.
The Committee plans to start a
summer orientation session to in-
clude some 1200 freshmen who live
within a 250-mile radius of Ann
Arbor.
The program will extend over
a six week period and keep each
student at the University for two
days. He will take tests, pay fees,
receive counseling and register.
Two men and two women will
be interviewed by University offi-
cials for the summer leaders at a
later date. They will be required
to spend six weeks at the Univer-
sity and will each be paid $250.
The first two days of fall orien-
tation will cover all freshmen who
didn't come for the summer ses-
sion, says Linda Green chairman
of Women's Orientation Commit-
tee..
Social Orientation
The rest of the period will be de-
voted to social orientation, she
continues. Leaders will introduce
newcomers to the University with
its different extra curricula activ-
ities and will explain the part they,
can play in each.
Women who have questions
about the new program, may con-
tact Orientation Committee mem-
bers in the League undergraduate
office or call Miss Green at 4016
Stockwell Hall.

PEARLS TO DIAMONDS:
Precious Stones Reveal Significant Meaning

Diamonds are sparkling on that
significant left finger and future
June brides are anxiously await-
ing the month of June.
The importance of certain pre-
cious stones is difficult to over-
look, especially the diamond,
which is April's birthstone and
symbolizes innocence.
Attributed to the sun as its gem
of light, the diamond inspired
even primitive people to a new be-
lief in the existence of an un-
quenchable flame and of incon-
querable virtue. As far back as the
history of the diamond can be
traced, this symbol of innocence
has been. appropriate as a sign
of plighted troth.
Gem Fortunes
Except in India, the home of
fabulous gem stone fortunes, the
diamond was once reserved for
kings and emperors. Many of the
world's greatest diamonds, their
histories surrounded by legend
and intrigue, are now set in
crowns and royal services.
The Cullinan collection, for in-
stance, cut from the largest dia-
mond ever found, is now part of
the British crown jewels. Other
valuable diamonds, such as the
Great Mogul and the Mattan,
have mysteriously vanished.
Diamonds are crystallized car-
bon and, chemically, they are the
simplest of all gems . . , yet the
hardest substance known to lnan.
A fine diamond is as clear in color
as a drop of the purest water,
World Supply
Those diamonds which are en-
tirely suffused with color, such
as deep blue, pink, violet, green
and red, are very rare. Africa sup-
plies the world with diamonds.
Although the diamond is of-
fered as a sign of "plighted troth,"
May's birthstone, the emerald is
considered a love stone. The emer-
ald has always been closely iden-

+f

tified with Venus and particularly Though pearls have been found
propitious for women, bringing in all colors of the rainbow, the
them happiness in love, comfort ones considered most desirable
in domestic affairs and safety in
childbirth. are those that have a creamy ros-
The most important source of eate tint. All colors, however, have
emeralds today is South America. been highly prized from the earli-
At the time of the Spanish con- est times. The pearl is important
quest the Incas were found to thought. It was a favorite symbol
have a great wealth of the gems,
but the location of the mines was in Oriental legend as a chief sym-
kept secret from the conquista- bol of health, energy, beauty and

of Diana. the protectress of you
girls.
The alexandrite, found only
Ceylon and the Urals, has the r
markable property of living t
lives in color. It is a splendid gre
by day and by candlelight an am
thystine red. The magic change
coldr with its depth and streng
makes it an exceptionally attra
tive ring stone for men.

dr. Lost hIca Mine
By accident,na mine was dis-
covered at Muse in 1558 yielding
emeralds of the finest quality of j
color and purity and hasbeen the
chief source ever since. Another
of the Lost Inca's emerald mines
was discovered at the turn of the
century.
Gold and emerald Jewelry hasj
been found in the mounds of Tus-
cany, Herculaneum and Pompeii,
cities which lay in ruins hundreds
of years before America was dis-
covered.
Health and Longevity
June is the month of the pearl,
the alexandrite and the moon-
stone- all signifying health and
longevity.
The pearl has been described as
one of the most exquisite of gems.
Long before they realized what it;
was, the ancients were enchanted
by its delicate beauty and lovely
sheen. With more imagination
than science, they decided that
pearls, were created when dew
drops were caught in an oyster
shell.l

t r s e m
DUE TO POPULAR DEMAN
The Indian Movie
"CHANDRALEKHA
bas been extended for a second shot
R+ on Tuesday, April 23, at 7,30 P.N
HOUSE FULL FOR MONDAY'S SHOW
Architecture Auditorium $1.00 per perst
Tickets on sale at International Center and at z
Re +td&h~hs

D

"

cuing
q.;

ALPHA PHI ANNIVERSARYTheta chapter of Alpha Phi was established at the University 65 years
ago this week. The chapter plans an anniversary luncheon celebration at 12:30 p.m. In the Anderson
Rm. of the Union. Mrs. Marion Wiley Keys will be guest speaker.
Labor Depart ent SuErveY Reveals
mp ta cofCoe ds' 1ofEducaton

71
ot.

The question of the importance-
of a college education for coeds,
which was once regarded as a
waste of time, is now taken for
granted. I
Today we see an increasing
number taking the advantages of
a college education, according to
a report from the Institute of Life
Insurance.
Back of this increase is the big
population change that has oc-
curred since the end of World War
II. It narrows down to a lot of
child en who will soon be compet-
ing for an education at various
colleges In the next decade or so,
it appears that dur youngsters
will outpace even the most inten-
sive plans for college expansion.
College-Bound Coeds
With pressure developing be-
cause of increased enrollment,

college-bound coeds may have to
step aside in favor of men, since
men are the prospective bread-
winners of future families. A col-
lege education has become a
necessity for them in order to earn
an adequate living for their wives
and children. This pressure is
likely to become more acute due
to the rising costs of college.
One of the overwhelming finan-
cial questions facing parents is the
cost of putting their children
through college. Many parents,
realizing this burden before their
youngster first begins donning his
freshman beanie, begin planning
for college funds.
F u n d s accumulated through
stocks, bonds, insurance and com-
pany savings accounts aid parents
in their long-range plans for col-
-lege.
Some people say that since most
girls get married sooner or later
and become busy raising families,
they fail to see the value of a col-
lege degree for them.
Survey Report
The answer to this argumentt
comes from a report compiled by
a group of women college gradu-
ates. Not long ago the Women's
Bureau of the United States labor
department asked several thou-
sand college women about them-
selves.
According 'to the survey four-
fifths of the women were working
at jobs in which they have been
trained. Thus the popularity of
secretarial training schools has
reached new heights.

Only a minority, said the survey,
was interested in a career. How-
ever the career women trend is
becoming even more promising as
more fields open their doors to the
"weaker sex."
Temporary Employment
Almost half of the women inter-
viewed said that they considered
paid employment as a temporary
activity between school and mar-
riage.
As far as these women are con-
cerned, it seems that a college
education, is something to be de-
sired because it is valuable in its
owia right -not just because it
can lead to a job and a business
career
The women emphasized the use-
fulness of their college experience
in helping them in their present
,or future roles as housewife or
mother. -
Community Contributions
Within half a year after gradua-
tion, these women were already
making worthwhile contributions
to their community, according to
the report.' They found nearly
three-quarters of all the women
active in an organized group.
Stated the report: "In their
roles as workers, homemakers and
citizens, the recent women gradu-
ates were undertaking adult re-
sponsibilities. They were turning
their special skills, their trained
minds, to the service of society,
as well as to the fulfillment of
their individual aims."

NOWANNOMMOMOM

An April Shower of
COTTONS!

I

,lcl'044 Campu4 I

Coeds Begin Spring Sports

With Ann Arbor weather finally
conceding that spring is here,
coeds will be participating in the
usual warm weather sports.
The Women's Physical Educa-
tion Department provides many
facilitise for those interested in
spring sports.
Picnic equipment for outdoor
cooking is available at the Wom-
en's Athletic Building. If students
wish to use picnic and softball
equipment, they call Barbour Gym
and request it before checking it
out.
For coeds who enjoy tennis, the
courts next to the WAB are re-
served for women. Tennis rackets
will be given women who show;

identification cards to the WAB
matron.
Golf clubs for students currently
enrolled in g6lf courses may also
be obtained in a similar manner.
Coeds who desire to take an
early summer "dip'? may use the
women's pool from 5:10 to 6:10
p.m. Monday through Friday, 8:15
to 9:15 p.m. Tuesday and Thurs-
day and 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. Satur-
day. Women and their dates may
swim at the pool from 7:15 to 9:15
p.m. Saturday and 3 to 5 p.m.
Sunday.
Bowling at the 'WAB is open to
all coeds Fridays from 3 to 5 p.m.
A nominal fee is charged per line
and all equipment is furnished.

DATE BUREAU - A meeting
will be held from 2 to 5 p.m. today
in the League undergraduate of-
fice for coeds interested in blind
dates for Frosh Weekend.
** * .
SENATE -- There is a Senate
meeting at 4 p.m. today at the
League.
* * *
PIHOTO CONTEST - Entries
for the Union sponsored photog-
raphy contest may be submitted
between 2 and 5 p.m. until Thurs-
day at the Union student offices.
* * *
MICHIGAN DAMES-Mrs. Alex
P omnichowski was recently
elected president of the Michigan
Dames at a general meeting in
Rackham Aud.
Elected to assist as vice-presi-
dent was Mrs. Robert Jardinico
and as recording secrtary was
Mrs. Sam Rousso. Other elected
were Mrs. William Drake, corres-
ponding secretary and Mrs. Tho-
mas Rose, treasurer.
PA RTY FAVORS
for
ALL OCCASIONS
Ball Office Supply
213 E. Washington Ph. 3-1161

For Work . .
Designed for easy care -- Fab-
rics all washable. All wonder-
fully at ease.
Dacron and Cotton. All cotton
that drip dry. Need little or no
ironing. Checks, prints, new
darks and pastels. Prices from
$8.95.
Sizes 7 to 15 . ..10-44.,.
12T/.-24/ . . . tall 10-20.

I,

For Play

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U.S. KOYLON

U.S. KOYLON 1

FOAM RUBBERroeini fleed

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off South U.'

Above our Gilden girl cotton. Colorful
balloon print. Divine dressing anytime.
Maize, pink, and turquoise... $12.95
Sizes 8-16.

I

GOOD BOOKS -
-BOB MARSHALL'S

Sloppy down or sagging spring furniture Cushions
can be converted to Solid One-Piece
FOAM-RUBBER NOW!
ALL STANDARD SIZES
We Fabricate Special Sizes or Shapes.
Pick-up & Delivery 1-Day Service PHONE NO 2-4706

kmwww

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DO YOU WEAR GLASSES?

See the New Type, Tiny,
Plastic, Invisible, Fl uid less
CONTACT LENSES

4

RENDEL'S UPHOLSTERY
FOAM-RUBBER SUPPLY DEPOT, 731 Lakeview, Ann Arbor
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Safe and practical for work and play. Write or phone for a free
booklet about contact lenses or drop in for a free demonstration.

Your best bib 'n' tucker

BETTER VISION CENTER

Ann Arbor

706 Wolverine Bldg.-4th and Washington Sts.
Phone NO 8-6019

**. for a summer of comfort and

II

Self-Service
WET WASH

yF
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^ .w' ...

Self-Service
FLUFF DIED
Saves Time and Money
8 Lb. Load
Less Than 1 Hour

JB -
KItf4

Fast and Economical
8 Lb. Load
30-Minute Time
35c

wrinkle-shedding chic: our dacron/cotton
shirtwaist, softly bibbed and tucked,
with just a hint of sleeves and an easy
airy skirt. Yellow, blue, mint, or
pink flattery in sizes 10 to 18. 25.00

60c

Everyone who owns SPOD
ENJOYS it. The finest in
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OTHER SERVICES INCLUDE

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*1'

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