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April 21, 1957 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1957-04-21

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I.

Sixty-Seventh Year
EDITED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
UNDER AUTHORITY OF BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BLDG. * ANN ARBOR, MICH. * Phone NO 2-3241

"But the angel said to the women,"Do not be afraid; for I know that ye seek
Jesus, who was crucified. He is not here; for He has risen, as He said.'"

-Matthew 28:5

"When Opinions Are Free
Truth Will Prevail"

Editorials printed in The Michigan Daily express the individual opinions of staff writers or
the editors. This must be noted in all reprints.
SUNDAY, APRIL 21, 1957 NIGHT EDITOR: ALLAN STILLWAGON

Higher Education's Impact
On the Student: Two Views

AS A CRAFTSMAN of the quasi-scientific
generalization, Prof. Philip E. Jacob of the
University of Pennsylvania is superb. As the
author of a 'comprehensive" study of the impact
of higher education on students' values, he is
somewhat unconvincing.
Recognizing that the conclusions he pre-
sented to the National Conference on Higher
Education in Chicago last month will be fol-
lowed by a more complete record of the study
later this spring, it is still very hard to see
how we can be expected to attempt serious
evaluation of his highly subjective claims with-
out benefit of objective evidence.
Prof. Jacob apparently does not recognize
this difficulty, for he has presented his charges
for discussion in a ten-page paper filled with
serious misgivings about the average college
experience, but void of whys, wherefores, and
statistics.
Lacking but one sample of the data upon
which his analysis must stand (student values,
emphasizing, vocational preparation, and skill
and experience in social adjustment are sug-
gested to apply to "75 or 80 per cent" of the
college population), it is, nevertheless, possible
to consider the validity of his "relevant findings
concerning contemporary student values," at
least as they apply to the educational atmos-
phere of the University.
THIS SHORT consideration will likewise lack
statistical evidence, but we do not, like
Prof. Jacobs, suggest questionnaires and statis-
tical surveys are adequate means to evaluation
of educational experience.
The most sweeping charge, and one which is
least applicable to the University is that "col-
lege experience barely touches a student's stan-
dards of behavior, quality of judgment, sense
of social responsibility or his guiding attitudes
and beliefs." A great deal of concern about the
quality and application of the undergraduate's
education is justifiable, but it cannot be granted
that his values and his life are "barely touched."
Two major characteristics of our particular
institution preclude this possibility: the atmos-
phere created by an usually high percentage
of graduate students, and a correspondingly
high enrollment of out-of-state students. These
two factors have lent to the creation of an in-
credible community of diversified interests.
They have, and will continue to have, a pro-
found effect upon the guiding attitudes of
students.
PROF. JACOB is disturbed at the remarkably
homogeneous values of students, especially
considering the "variety of their social, eco-
nom~ic, ethnic, racial and religious back-
grounds." He then strongly offers this conform-
ity as an explanation of students' willingness to
live in "a mobile society, without racial, ethnic
or income barriers."
How conformity can pave the high-road for
mobility, or is the direct cause of tolerance,
"racial, ethnic or economic," it is difficult to
see. And it is also difficult to understand why
Prof. Jacob has chosen to damn this particular
phenomena, since it has brough't students to at
least some of his own goals, "world-minded-
ness , . . openmindedness . . . social justice."
The "Comprehensiveness" and significance of
Prof. Jacob's report cannot be judged until
after publication of the complete text. The
preliminary conclusions appear to have been
sincerely and thoroughly prepared.
But the final report should exhibit a signifi-
cantly greater background of objective evi-
dence, or, if it will speak subjectively, to avoid
the tenuous generalization that marred last
month's presentation.
-ALLAN STILLWAGON

PROFESSOR JACOB of the University of
Pennsylvania has charged that the values of
most college students do not change to any ap-
preciable extent in college, and that students
whose values change do not change them be-
cause of involvement in the formal education
process.
Based on a 1950 study of trends in higher
education, Professor Jacob asserts the college
experience barely touches the standards of be-
havior, quality of judgement or guiding beliefs
and attitudes of the average student.
It is not at all difficult to see these assertions
are accurate and true.
For the average college student, college is no
more than an extension of secondary education.
Early in his life it becomes an accepted fact
that he will go to college. A college, then, be-
comes not a place of higher education, a place
to discover the answers to questions that could
not be answered in high school, but merely the
place he goes to "after high school."
College today is not equivalent to the college
of fifty years ago. Economic conditions in the
United States have become such that hundreds
of thousands more can afford to go to college.
Colleges have ceased to be inhabited only by
students who wish to learn and to study. They
have been largely supplanted by the student
who comes to school to get a husband or to
avoid earning a living for four years or to en-
joy the freedom from responsibility a student
has. How, then, can a student with these goals
be expected to make any significant changes in
his personal and intellectual values?
WHEN AN average student takes a seminar or
discussion course he becomes unhappy and
uncomfortable because the instructor does not
ask him to parrot facts learned in lecture but
rather seeks his ideas and opinions. The col-
lege experience cannot affect the student who
would like to re-evaluate himself but doesn't
feel up to risking his leisure or his social
standing by thinking independently.
The cruel truth of college life is that true
learning and intellectual growth comes not
from the courses and instructor but from the
student himself.
College students are remarkably set in their
ways. This is evidenced by the fact most stu-
dents are conformists. The freshman arrives on
campus with only a vague idea of proper beha-
vior of an "Ivy" student. After a few years of
college he knows the proper things to gripe
about, the correct behavior on a date and the
right group of people to be associated with-
in other words the right way to conform.
CONFORMITY in turn leads to stagnation of
the intellect. To conform the student needs
not be physically similar to a particular group
but he must think along similar lines. It would
be wonderful if students conformed to the idea
that they should try to independently form
their own values. But unfortunately, the aver-
age student is all too eager and willing to let
someone else think for him.
Universities and colleges can no longer expect
students to be desirous of expanding their ca-
pacity for independent thinking. Indeed, it may
well be that the concept of colleges as held in
1900 may have to be abandoned and, in the fu-
ture, colleges would function as a higher stage
of secondary education, leaving studying to be
done in graduate schools.
But the average student who is unaffected by
college makes up only about 80 percent of the
student population. From the remaining 20 per
cent will come the thinkers, philosophers, and
intellectuals of America. These are the students
who take it upon themselves to learn and to
think-the students for whom colleges were
originally intended.
-PHILIP MNCK

SECOND SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
May 31 to June 11, 1957
For courses having both lectures and recitations the "Time
of Class" is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitation only, the "Time of Class" is the time
of the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined
at special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there
is no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict, the conflict
is revolved by the class which conflicts with the regular schedule.
Degree candidates having a scheduled examination on June
10 and 11 will be given an examination at an earlier date. The
following schedule designates an evening time for each such
examination. The instructor may arrange with the student for
an alternate time, with notice to he schedtuling committee.
Evening Schedule for Degree Candidates
Mon. Mon. Tues. Tues.
Regular June 10 June 10 June 11 June 11
Exam Time 9-12 AM 2-5 PM 9-12 AM 2-5 PM
Mon. Tues. Thurs. Fri.
Special June 3 June 4 June 6 June 7
Period 7-10 PM 7-10 PM 7-10 PM 7-10 PM
Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination.
REGULAR SCHEDULE

4

'e

'1

Time of Class

Time of Examination

MONDAY

-Daily-John Hirtzei

WASHINGTON MERRY-GO-ROUND:
A mbassador Resigns
By DREW PEARSON

(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at

8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3
8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Saturday, June 1
Monday, June 3
Tuesday, June 4
Friday, May 31
Thursday, June 6
Thursday, June 6
Friday, June 7
Saturday, June 8
Tuesday, June 4
Monday, June 3
Saturday, June I
Wednesday, June 5
Friday, June 7
Saturday, June 8
Thursday, June 6

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

,

TUESDAY

THE resignation of Dr. Joseph
Simonson, prominent Lutheran
clergyman, as American Ambassa-
dor to Ethiopia, was accompanied
by the usual exchange of pleasant
letters with the White House.
Rev. Simonson told Ike what "A
precious privilege" it had oeen to
serve "such an honored and dedi-
cated leader," while Ike thanked
the retiring ambassador for "your
untiring efforts" and said "you
have my heartfelt thanks for a
job well done."
Inside fact, however. is that
Simonson resigned because Vice-
President Nixon referred to him as
a "Cornball."
As far as newsmen accompany-
ing Nixon could see, Simonson was
a hard-working, friendly envoy.
However, Nixon, during his two-
night stay in Addis Ababa, con-
cluded otherwise. Shortly after he
departed, he was quoted as refer-
ing to an American Ambassador as
a "cornball," and aides made it
clear he had Rev. Simonson in
mind. Later he made a critical re-
port on Rev. Simronson, and the
latter'snresignation followed short-
ly afterward.
THE QUESTION of how much
aid the new government of Poland
should get from the United States
has oeen under serious debate in-
side the Eisenhower Administra-
tion.
The National Security Council
has leaned toward generous aid.

Military leaders in the Pentagon
are inclined to go even further.
They want to encourage the new
Poland.
But Secretary Dulles has been
more conservative.
His private offer of only $75,000,-
000 caused Polish delegate Kotlicki
to point out that if his delegation
goes home with such a tiny
amount, the Russians will be in a
position to ballyhoo it as proof
the United States can't be de-
pended on.
Meanwhile, two Polish-Ameri-
cans from Chicago believed that
they got more encouragement from
the President. When Charles Roz-
marek, President of the Polish-
American Congress, and Kasimir
Kozakiewicz, president of the Pol-
ish Roman Catholic Union, called
on Ike, he told them: "I am very
much interested in the present
plight of the Polish people, and I
am in favor of giving them every
possible assistance."
"Does that mean, Mr. President,
that you would not be opposed to
economic aid to the extent of
about $125,000,000 to relieve a'
pressing food problem in Poland?"
asked Rozmarek,
"Yes, it does," replied Eisen-
hower,
THE CHICAGOANS' plea to the
White House is considered signifi-
cant. It meant that their organi-
zations, representing over 7,000,000
Polish-Americans, were enthusias-

tically behind the aid proposal de-
spite the opposition of congres-
sional isolationists and State De-
partment fears that our aid dollars
would be confiscated by Russia. .
The proposed $125,000,000 is a
compromise figure for the relief
of a food shortage that will begin
to be felt about June 1. The Polish
delegation has been asking for
about $300,000,000, including cred-
its for farm machinery.
"It is significant that the Polish
people, facing a serious food crisis,
have turned to the West for help
rather than to Moscow," Kazakie-
wicz told Eisenhower. "'They are
trying to, inch further away to-
ward independence from Russia.
If we fail to answer this call for
aid, Poland will slin back hope-
lessly into the complete Iron Cur-
tain captivity it knew beforethe
revolt of last year."
"We must not let that happen,"
agreed Eisenhower. "But, of course,
I do not have the last word on this
question. Congress must approve
any aid funds, and there has been
some opposition, as you know, in
Congress."
"If you mean Senator Know-
land of California, I do not think
he will stand in the way," re-
marked Rozmarek. "I had a long
talk with him the other day, in
which I tried to answer his objec-
tions to aid for Polafnd. When it
was over, he said to me: 'Well,
you may be right. I am not in-
fallible'."
(Copyright 1957 by Bell Syndicate, Inc.)

SPECIAL PERIODS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS

Botany 2, 122
Bus. Ad. 11
Bus. Ad. 12
Chemistry 1, 3, 4, 8, 14
Chemistry 183
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54, 101,
153
Economics 71
Economics 72
English 1, 2
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 22, 31, 32,
61, 62
German 1, 2, 11, 32
Naval Science 102, 202, 302, 402
Political Science 2
Psychology 167, 173, 226, 256
Sociology 1, 4, 101
Sociology 60
Spanish 1, 2, 22, 31, 32

Friday, June 7
Thursday, June 6
Thursday, June 6
Saturday, June 8
Saturday, June 8
Friday, May 31
Thursday, June 6
Thursday, June 6
Friday, May 31
Monday, June 10
Monday, June 10
Wednesday, June 5
Tuesday, June 11
Friday, May 31
Wednesday, June 5
Saturday, June 8
Tuesday, June 11

2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
7-10 p.m.
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
7-10 p.m.
2-5
2-5
9-12
9-12
9-12

-4

A. E. 130
C. E. 20
C. E. 21
C. E. 22
C. E. 151
Draw. 1, 22
Draw. 2, 33
Draw. 12
E. E. 5
E. M. 1
E. M. 2
*E. M. 1, 2
English 10, 11
I. E. 100, 110
I. E. 120
M. E. 2
M. E. 32, 132
Naval Science
Physics 53
Physics 54

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
Saturday, June 8.
Wednesday, uJne 5
Friday, May 31
Monday, June 10
Friday, May 31
Friday, May 31
Tuesday, June 11
Monday, June 10
Wednesday, June 5
Monday, June 10
Wednesday, June 5
Tuesday, June 11
Wednesday, June 5
Saturday, June 8
Friday, May 31
Monday, June 10
Tuesday, June 11
102, 202, 302, 402 Wednesday, Junes
Tuesday, June 11
Friday, May 31

9-12
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
9-12
9-12
1-10 p.m.
9-12
2-5

L

TALKING ON TELEVISION:
Ed Sullivan -'Toast of the Town'

Suez: Fool's Paradise

T HE FIRST British ship since the incident
of last November has entered the Suez
Canal, without protesting the payment of tolls
to the Egyptians. An American ship is scheduled
to go through next week, after recording what
amounts to a token protest.
Editorial Staff
RICHARDASNYDER, Editor
RICHARD HALLORAN LEE MARKS
Editorial Director City Editor
GAIL GOLDSTEIN ....,..,.......Personnel Director
ERNEST THEODOSSIN ............ Magazine Editor
JANET REARICN....Associate Editorial Director
MARY ANN THOMAS................Features Editor
DAVID GRET.. ................,Sports Editor
RICHARD CRAMER......... Associate Sports Editor
STEPHEN HEILPERN ........ Associate Sports Editor
JANE FOWLER and
ARLINE LEWIS .............Women's Co-Editors
JOHN HIRTZEL ................ Chief Photographer
Business Staff
DAVID SILVER, Business Manager
3(ILTON GOLDSTEIN ... Associate Business Manager
WILLIAM PUSCH.............. Advertising Manager
CHARLES WILSON ............... Finance Manager

It thus appears that Egypt has lost the
battle, but won the war. No one except Israel
is offering any resistange to the virtual nation-
alization of the canal. Great Britain and France
have been thoroughly cowed by the United
States, so that Egypt can now get away with
whatever it wants.
On the surface the British ship's entrance
appears to be a sign of hope for the future:
peace has been achieved and things are going
back to normal. Everything is going to be okay.
IT CAN'T BE okay, however, as long as Egypt
feels that she can dictate who is and who
isn't to use the canal, as she has done and is
doing in the case of Israel. A dangerous pre-
cedent is being established. If Egypt can bar
the canal to Israel, on the grounds the two
states are "technically at war" with each other,
then any other country can be refused passage
for similar reasons, equally groundless.
Despite this, the United States is doing
nothing more than offering a protest for the
record, before submitting meekly to a third-
rate power. Aside from the fact this does noth-
ing to ease the Middle Eastern situation, there
is also the possibility we may also find our-
selves faced with similar actions by other small

By LARRY EINHORN
Daily Television Writer
TELEVISION programs come and
go, as Red Buttons, Wally Cox,
Milton Berle and a few others can
tell you. But over the years only
two programs have maintained
their top standing-"I Love Lucy"
and "The Ed Sullivan Show."
And since Lucy is abandoning
her regular weekly situation com-
edy format at the end of this sea-
son in favor of a once-a-month
emerge as the only regular weekly
television star who has kept his
show on or near the top of the
heap for the many years since the
coaxial cable was completed.
Sullivan hasn't had an easy time
in maintaining this record. He has
occupied the choicest Sunday night
time period on CBS for almost 10
years. In that time NBC has put
up what it thought to be its best
comedy shows to try to break the
Sullivan domination of Sunday
night at 8. In the early years the
popular "Colgate Comedy Hour,"
with the rotating top comedian
format, oroved to be oz some com-
petition to Sullivan. Such stars as
EddieC rnto.n Ahhtt A Crt11n

stage the top names in motion pic-
tures, television, Broadway, radio,
vaudeville and the outstanding
names among drilling team circles.
Sullivan finally knocked the
"Colgate Comedy Hour" off tele-
vision and NBC came up with a
show called "The Comedy Hour"
to replace it. Once again top com-
edians were recruited from all over
the country, some from semi-re-
tirement, to try to eat into the
lusty Sullivan ratings. During this
time Sullivan enjoyed his greatest
supremacy of Sunday night, for
the "Comedy Hour" had such a
small rating that'sometimes it
owed Trendex a few points.
And so last summer NBC dump-
ed "The Comedy Hour" and took
Steve Allen off the midnight shift
and plotted him against Sullivan.
Allen has since found out that the
name Ed Sullivan and Sunday
night are synomonous. Allen has
only out-rated Sullivan three
times in almost a year, once when
he had someone by the name of
Elvis Presley as a guest star, once
when Sullivan went artistic ano
presented opera and last weCk
when Allen had Esther Williams a

show is $75,000 while Allen, though
getting lower ratings, is given
$100,000 weekly to spend attract-
ing guest stars.
Sullivan has become a television
personality, in fact one of the top
television personalities, without
ever having to sing a song, perform
a dance, tell a joke, become a dra-
matic actor or present news. He
hasn't even had to drill in order
to become a top television person-
ality. And most important of all,
he hasn't had to ask or answer quiz
questions in order to become what
he is.
Many people believe Sullivan has
no talent. As far as his winning
an amateur contest or a talent
search, these people are right. He
can't sing, dance or smile. But
Sullivan possesses one of the
greatest talents of anyone in tele-
vision-knowing what to do and
what to sign for his show at the
right time.
IN TALKING to Rickie Layne,
who with his accented dummy
Velvel nas made nine appearances
on the Sullivan show, I found out
o little .hit n ahr+ err +, m.I

*Conflict Exam. This period is to be used only by those having
a schedule conflict in E. M. 1 or 2 at the regular hour.
SPECIAL INSTRUCTION
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflicts between
assigned examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
See bulletin board outside Room 301 W.E. between April 26 and
May 13 for instructions.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit of
the University. For time and place of examinations, see bulletin
board in the School of Music.
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES

:. i

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