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April 18, 1957 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-04-18

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PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, ArRYL 18, 195'

IIAIIII IIIIIIT .HEIIIMIIIHIGIIIIIIIAIIIYIITHURSDAY, APRILII 18, 1---9-57-

FOLLOW OLD LEGEND:
Red Chinese Cross Barrier, Tap Tibet's Resources
a'________-___________________

TI

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

HONG KONG (P)-According to
Tibetan legend, there once existed
in the lofty land of Tibet hordes of
gold-digging ants who burrowed
deep beneath the cold earth and
scratched up mounds of golden
dust.
The arits, if they ever existed,
have long vanished, but a new
army of diggers is now pecking
at the hard grey face of Tibet in
an attempt to tap the virgin riches
of the isolated country.
They come from Communist
China, in a giant movement of
road builders, railway surveyors,
farmers, agricultural experts, pros-
pectors, laborers and soldiers,
trekking over ancient mountain
barriers.
Chinese Remaking Tibet
These new settlers are remak-
ing the map of Tibet, the once for-
gotten land ringed by jagged
ranges and inhabited by a fierce-
ly independent people who for cen-
turies have resisted foreign dom-
ination.
Since the Chinese Communists
marched into Tibet with some 4,-
000 crack troops in October 1950,
the Peiping regime has unfolded
great plans for the snowy land
three times the size of California.
These plans, however, have been
accompanied by frequent reports
of rebellion to Communist occupa-
tion. The Tibetans, steeped in
feudalism and rigid religious tra-
dition, have taken slowly to Red-
type reforms.
Reds Pushing Land Reform
Instead of forcing innovations,
Peiping appears to be approach-'
ing the problem of land reform
through two routes:
1)Conversion by example. Col-
lective farms, equipped with semi-
modern implements and super-
vised by trained agriculturists, are
outproducing Tibetan's farms run
on feudal lines. Some day, Peiping

is said to hope, Tibetans will see
the light.
2) Weaning away younger Ti-
betans to Communism. Thousands
of Tibetan youth are being sent
to China for schooling.
Train Youth in Communism
Other thousands have been en-
rolled in Communist youth and
young Pioneer organizations, the
training grounds for Communist
party workers.
Peiping's propaganda organs tell
almost daily of new schools, crops,
mineral discoveries, hospitals pop-
ping up over the country.
In what even non-Communist
experts allow as a tribute to Red
engineering and drive, some 2,000
miles of road have been con-
structed within Tibet, mainly by
Red soldiers. There wasn't a road
before 1952.
This network, although in parts
little more than wide paths hug-
ging 20,Q00 foot mountains, criss-
crosses Tibet. Another 2,700 miles
of road connect Lhasa with China
proper.
One internal road links Lhasa
with Shigatse, the second major
city 120 miles to the southwest
and spans the raging Brahmapu-
tra. Flood control measures are
under way and Peiping claims the
power output of Lhasa is 20 times
what it was in 1949.
Prospect for Gold
Gold sands found in the lower
Yangtze and Indus rivers wash
down from the Himalayan and
Shan ranges in Tibet, the head-
waters of these streams. The Com-
munists are going after the gold
at its source.
Peiping has boasted of these dis-
coveries but says little of the mass
migration that inevitably follows
such finds. But clues are ,dropped
occasionally, and w e 11- p l a c e d

sources put the colonization target
in the millions.
The likely reason for silence
is that Peiping does not want to
alarm India, whose sphere of in-
fluence extends through Nepal,
Sikkim and Bhutan, tiny buffer
states which border Tibet.
Plan Tibet-China Railroad
Plans have been announced
for a railroad linking Lhasa with
China proper. The project, which
would be' one of the monumental
railroad engineering tasks of his-
tory, was first announced last
spring during a visit of Chinese
leaders to Lhasa.
It was welcomed by Tibetans
plagued with high food prices and
a shortage of goods.
Little, however, has been men-
tioned of the project since. Only
recently Peiping announced sur-
veying has finally started.
The first passenger plane to fly
over Potala Palace, Lhasa home
of the Dalai Lama, Tibet's spir-
itual leader, landed at a newly-
built strip last May, heralding
what Peiping called the start of
weekly air service between the
capitals.
Air Travel Hazardous
The pilot of the history-mak-
ing flight wore an oxygen mask,
warmed himself with a cockpit
heater and later complained it was
a miserable trip over uncharted
mountains.
Peiping later indicated service
was being held up until it could
establish weather stations over Ti-

bet to chart air currents and
storms.
In spite of Tibet's natural bar-
riers, Red China has forged a
marked change in only six years.
One of the few descriptive re-
ports of modern-day Lhasa comes
from a former Western journalist,
Israel Epstein, writing in a Peiping
propaganda organ. Epstein lives in;
China.
Report Indicates Transformation
His report, although colored by
his enthusiasm for the Red regime,
gives some indication of the trans-
formation.
"One quickly notices new things
that have appeared since the lib-
eration (Communist term for oc-
cupation)" he writes in People's
China. "A couple of years ago,
there was hardly a wheel used for
transportation.
"Now, the streets are often
blocked by traffic jams of big
trucks loaded with supplies," he
says. "Tibetan cyclists and motor-
cyclists mix with horsemen. Some
peasants bring in their produce on
rubber-tired cars.
Have Few Telephones
The idea of a telephone probably
would have set a tent-dwelling
Tibetan to laughing in disbelief
a decade ago. Until 1949, the en-
tire land had only one wireless set
-that in a now defunct British
diplomatic mission.
The propagandist says one
thing, however, that can be taken
at face value.
"All over," he writes, "flies the
five-star flag of the People's Re-
public of China."

(Continued from Page 4)
Science, University of California at Los
Angeles, will speak on "The Inter-
pretation of Contemporary American
Psychology Colloquium: Dr. George
Miller of Harvard University will discuss
"Patterns of verbal Behavior" Fri.,
April 19 at 4:15 p.m., Aud. B., Angell
Hall.
Astronomical Colloquium: Fri., April
19, 4:15 p.m., the Observatory. Dr. Free-
man D. Miller will speak on "Physical
Processes in Comets."
Doctoral Examination for Walter Les-
lie Meyer, Chemistry; thesis: "1, 5-
Diaryl-2, 3-Pyrrolidinediones and 5-
Aryl-3-Arylamino-2 (5H) - Furanones",
Thurs., April 18, 2024 Chemistry Build-
ing, at 3:00 p.m. Chairman, W. R.
vaughan.
Doctoral Examination for Robert Wil-
lard Cochran, English Language and
Literature: thesis: "In Search of Per-
spective: A Study of the serious Nov-
els of John P. Marquand." Fri., April
19, East Council Room, Rackham Bldg.,
at 3:00. Chairman R. C. Boys.
Doctoral Examination for Robert An-
drew Paterson, Botany: thesis: "A Con-
tribution to the Limnology and Mycolo-
gy of the Phycomycetes which Invade
Pianktanic Organisms," Fri., April 19.
1139 Natural Science Building, at 9:00
a.m. Chairman, F. K. Sparrow.
Placement Notices
PERSONNEL REQUESTS:
Tube Turns, Div. of Nat'1 Cylinder
Gas Co., Louisville, Ky., has an open-
ing for an Applied Mathematician who
has had engineering courses or experi-
ence, particularly in the field of me-
chanics and stress analysis, and cover-
ing such subjects as strength of ma-

terials, theory of elasticity and theories
of plasticity to the extent they have
been developed, basic laws of fluid and
heat flow, should be familiar with dif-
ferential equations, Bessel functions,
complex variables, vector, tensor, and
matrix operation.
Sherwin Williams Co., Cleveland, O,
has a position for an accounting grad-
uate to work in the Tax Div in the
field of Corporation Taxes.
Hallmark Cards, Kansas City, Mo.,
needs men and women in Acctg., Mfg.,
Merchandising, Creative Art, Writing
and Secretarial work.
Brush Beryllium Co., Luckey, Ohio,
is looking for a man with experience
in Matal. E. and for men without
experience in Chem. E., Metal, E., and
Instrument E., for vacancies in the El-
more, Ohio, plant, which extracts beryl-
lium from raw ore and produces berly-
hium copper and other beryllium al-
loys.

Lincoln Div., Ford Motor Co., Wixom,
Mich., has an opening for a new gradu-
ate or a man with an MA for the po-
sition of Conference Leader. Must be
able to work with all levels of manage-
ment, some administrative work.
Central Soya Co., Ft. Wayne, Ind..
is interested in finding a man with a
degree in Journalism or allied fields,
and experienced in writing brochures,
circulars, advertising copy or news
stories, for the position of Assistant to
the Director of Advertising and Sales
Promotion.
The Great Books Foundation, New
York, N.Y., has an opening for a man
with an LS&A background, with, per-
haps, a graduate degree orequivalent
experience, to work as Middle Atlantic
Area Director.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin.
Bldg., ext. 3371.

AA Valuation
Sets Record
According to a report made by
the City Assessor, Ann Arbor's to-
tal assessed valuation rose 11%
over last year's total.
With a total valuation of $91,-
311,400, it represents the first time
that the figure has passed the
ninety million mark.
"There is certainly only one
word which could describe the
growth - phenomenal," the asses-
sor said in his report.

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There's always a sale
at BOB MARSHALL'S

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Who Cares lfit's Raining!
There's a glamorous look to our Shower
Shedding in rich new fabrics and shades
-pretty enough to wear over your East-
er suit.
Water Repellent Rayon - Failles - Shantungs
Tweeds - Cotton & Rayon - Twils

in
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OBEDIENT
SEPARATES
y fT
by
COLLEGE - TOWN
Yes, you'll love the way these co
crisp separates are tailored to fit t
most discriminating taste. The sli
smart Ivy League skirt is made to
with the delightful geometric pri
ti
sleeveless blouse.
You'll thrill also at the tiny pric
just made for your budget.
SKIRT . . . $5.95
BLOUSE . . $3.95
lower level sport shop
C o
f STATE ar

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f'N
Year
2"
'r
,sI

ol,
the
im,
go
int

0

Arom $1795
SIZES from 8

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)1'

HI Fl STUDIO
Your Headquarters for
* HI FI COMPONENTS
" HI FI KITS
* HI FIPHONOGRAPHS
* AM-FM RADIOS
* NEW AND USED TV SETS
1317 South University NO 8-7942

COTTON POPLIN
Plaid and Solid Car Coats.
AT LEFT is Tweed, Cotton &
Rayon, Rain or Shine Coat with
matching hat...........
Closed
Good Friday
from
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Y
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nd LIBERTY

R

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- I '~i - I"' I l~ - oIKa---------------------,--a

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