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April 18, 1957 - Image 6

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Michigan Daily, 1957-04-18

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PAGE BMX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 1957

-AE IXIIIIIIII THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAYl APRIL 18. 1957lllllllllllllllll|| IlI .1. | --

__

p je . .. ELMER SWANSON

Cleveland Must Give Up
Pan-Am Games of 1959

By BOB BOLTON
As a rule, assistant t r a c k
coaches have few claims to fame.
But to every rule there is an
exception and Michigan's assist-
ant track coach, Elmer Swanson,
jokingly says he has at least one
claim to fame.
It seems as though there is more
than one Elmer Swanson in this
country; in fact, there are several
Elmer Swansons and Michigan's
version, the way he tells it, is re-
lated to all of them.
To start off, Swanson's father's
name is Elmer, nis father-in-law's
name is Elmer Swanson; there are
several miscellaneous other rela-
tives named Elmer Swanson and
his mother-in-law's maiden name
was Swanson he thinks; but he
says he looses track and after a
few minutes we also lost track.

However, Swanson is not prim-
arily known for the coincidence
of names that appears in his an-
cestry. He is better known as a
former all-time great Michigan
athlete and as a "right hand man"
who has helped head Coach Don
Canham produce winning track
teams since 1948.
'M' Man Since 1942
Swanson has been a Michigan
man since 1942, with time out for
a brief hitch in the Marines and a
two year fling at professional base-
ball in 1946-48.
In '48 Canham became head
track coach and he asked Swan-
son, who was then playing with
Williamsport, a Tiger farm teamns
in the Eastern League, to be his
assistant.
Swanson accepted Canham's of-
fer and has been here for the last

nine years and, despite having re-
ceived other coaching offers, in-
tends to stay at Michigan "as long
as they want me" simply because
"I like it here."
Won Six Letters
As an athlete at Michigan
Swanson won six letters, three
each in baseball and track. He
competed on the cinder paths as a
hurdler in the winter and the base
piths as a catcher-first baseman
in the spring.
During the scholastic year of
1943-44 Swanson played an im-
portant part in the Wolverines
greatest sports year -Michigan
won eight out of 10 titles that year
- as he helped both the track and
baseball squads win conference
championships.
At the Big Ten indoor finals
Swanson added 10 points to the
Michigan cause by winning both
the high and low hurdles.
In the lows Swanson scored a
surprising victory o v e r Buddy
Young, the great All - American
halfback from Illinois.
After the track season, Swan-
son turned to baseball and helped
the Wolverines capture the Big
Ten title by hitting over the .300
mark for the season.
Enters Marines
After the close of the '44 school
year Swanson entered the Marines,
delaying the completion of his
senior year until the winter of '46.
He wound up his remaining ath-
letic eligibility uring the spring of
that year by smashing six home
runs in six consecutive games.

""""""""""""

I-

-Daily-Leonard Cyr
ELMER SWANSON-Michigan's assistant track coach since 1948
is pictured on the job at Ferry Field. Swanson was six letter man
in his undergraduate days.
I-M Spring Sports To Begin
Fr International Students

BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY
SUMMER SCHOOL
JUNE 24 - AUGUST 2
-Coeducational
--For Graduate and qualified
Undergraduate students
-Credit transferable
Institutes, courses and special
conferences on:
AMERICAN LITERATURE
AMERICAN CIVILIZATION
ARCHAEOLOGY
PSYCHOLOGY
THEORETICAL PHYSICS
For further information clip and mail to:
Brandeis Summer School, Hayden B - 49,
Waltham, Massachusetts

DETROIT (AP) - The city of
Cleveland, Ohio, yesterday an-
nounced it would not be able to
hold the Pan American Games in
1959 and the program was im-
mediately switched to Guatemala
City, Guatemala.
Cleveland Mayor Ant'-'ny J.
Celebreeze explained that his city
could not be the site of the 1959
games without a five million dollar
appropriation from Congress.
This is a great disappointment
to Ohio's state auditor, James A.
Rhodes, who was the originator of
the plan to get the games for
Cleveland. In 1955 he approached
Celebreeze with his plan and the
Mayor gave Rhodes a letter of
authorization to make a bid on the
city's behalf.
Bid Surprise
When word was received that
Cleveland had won the bid, much
to the surprise of Celebreeze, a
committee was set up to draw up
plans for the huge undertaking.
The first step the committee
took was to authorize the donation
of a half-million dollars worth of
land for the site of the spectacular.
With state and county aid they
would raise seven million dollars
of the twelve million dollars need-
ed to stage the games.
The rest of the five million
dollars which was needed was to
come from Congressional appro-
priations. Ohio's former Senator
G. Bender succeeded in getting the
resolution authorizing the federal
funds through the Senate Con-
gresswoman Frances Bolton got
the resolution through the House.
Twenty or Else ...
MONTREAL (M)-Twenty goals
a season, a target a lot of National
Hockey League players never real-
ize, has been set by Maurice Rocket
Richard of the Montreal Canadiens
as the key to his retirement plans.
The Rocket, at 35 the NHL's
eldest performer, said after the
Canadiens had won the Stanley
Cup against Boston that he'll quit
the year he doesn't score 20 goals.

The spring I-M season is rap-
idly moving into full swing, with
a variety of events and tourna-
ments lined up.
Students representing all the
foreign nations will once again
compete in a soccer league. Among
the returning teams, is last year's
winner, International, composed

The bill suffered a serious set-
back when Bender lost in his bid
for re-election to the Senate. The
new Senator, Frank Lausche, dis-
approved the use of federal funds
for the games. The State Depart-
ment whose budget the money
was to come from backed Laus-
che's stand.
The final blow came in the now
famous budget fight which is still

in full swing on the floor of Con-
gress.
In an effort to cut the budget
the House appropriations subcom-
mittee vote down the bill to give
Cleveland the five million dollars
they needed to stage the games.
They did this in spite of the fact
that Presient Dwight D. Eisenhow-
er had spoke up for the Pan Amer-
ican games in one of his press con-
ferences last month.

'M' Nine Early Pioneer
In Foreign Excursions,

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of students from all parts of the
world.
Also participating will be the
strongly rated Turkey team,
which seems to always come up
with a first class club.
Toward the end of the soccer
season, a cricket league will re-
sume its play from last spring.
Among the teams in this league
are the Indians, Pakistanis, and a
group of men from the British
Empire.
Another International Center
event will be a round robin bas-
ketball league in which Turkey,
Latvia, Hawaii and china will try
to take top honors. Next week will
mark the opening of this bi-an-
nual event, during which Turkey
plays Latvia, and Hawaii plays
China in the opening round.
Sports Building hours for the
current spring season will be as
follows: Monday to Friday from
8:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m. and on Sat-
urdays from 8:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.

(This is the first of two articles
concerning a trip to Japan made by
the Michigan baseball team in 1929.)
By FRED KATZ
Expeditions to foreign lands for
the primary purpose of playing
baseball has become a fairly com-
mon occurrence during the past
decade, with such clubs as the
New York Yankees and Giants
and the Brooklyn Dodgers lead-
ing the way.
College teams, notably Ohio
State, have also followed suit, dis-
playing their talents overseas.
It is a relatively obscure fact,
hidden by the dust on the record
books, that Michigan was one of
the forerunners of this post-season
activity,-fielding teams on Japan-
ese soil in the summers of 1929
and 1932. ,
First Trip Best
Ray Fisher, Michigan baseball
coach in those years, as well as
today, preferred to discuss his 1929
trip since he feels that that team
was one of his very best. Indeed,
the records bear him out for the
Wolverines not only captured the
Big Ten championship but also
won 20 of their 23 games during
the summer months.
The plans for the trip were first
originated when the University of
Meiji, touring the United States
during the spring of that year,
came to Ann Arbor. Then, with
the assistance of Michigan alum-
ni living in Tokyo, an invitation
was extended to the Maize and
Blue.
And what an invitation it was!
All expenses paid, including
round-trip passage on a Japanese

luxury liner, and one month's stay
in Tokyo's finest hotel, The Im-
perial.
The 14-man team left Ann Ar-
bor on July 29, traveling by train
to the West Coast, and playing
home town squads along the way.
The Wolverines took a rather in-
direct route, stopping at such
places as Aberdeen, South Dakota,
Tacoma, Seattle, Everett, and Bel-
lingham, Washington, and Van-
couver, B.C. They were beaten
only by Everett.
Catching their ship, the Shin-
yo Maru, on August 14 at San
Francisco, they made a stop six
days later at Hawaii. The pur-
pose of the stopover? To play
baseball, of course.
The world voyageers found little
difficulty with Hawaii University's
team, but the highlight was de-
feating the professional Negro All-
Stars from the states who were
in Honolulu at the same time.
(The second article will include the
team's experiences in Japan and how
they fared baseball-wise.)
Pistons Take Kramer
Ron Kramer was chosen yes-
terday by the Detroit Pistons in
the National Basketball Asso-
ciation's annual player draft. .
It was indicated that the
drafting of Kramer was little
more than "a publicity gim-
mick" since he has been draft-
ed by the Green Bay Packers in
the National Football League
and apparently is destined to a
gridiron career.

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