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April 03, 1957 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-04-03

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, APRIL , 157

STUDENTS PETITIONED:
'U' Engine School Honor System Began in 1916

(Continued from Page 1)
cheat themselves and have never
seen any of it.
Students Petition
The honor system was estab-
lished in the engineering college
in 1916 by petition of students.
However, it was partially suspend-
ed during the war because of spe-
cial military trainees attending
school, who had "little regard for
the traditions of the College,"
Dean Emmons explained.
However, in 1949 a referendum
was held and the honor system
was overwhelmingly returned to
full use.
Dear Emmons emphasized that
the system "must be wanted by the
people who live under it."
Engineering students must sign
a pledge after each examination,
Dial NO 8-6416

"I have not given or received aid
during this examination."
Teachers come to the room with
the tests and then leave. They may
occasionally return to answer ques-
tions. Violations may be reported
by students or teachers who may
see a "marked similarity in mis-
takes" on examinations.
Ii a student sees another cheat-
ing, he may tap his pencil on the
desk to warn the cheater he is be-
ing watched. If the cheater per-
sists, he should be reported.
Reports go to the Student Honor
Council. The Council is a self-
perpetuating group, because ac-
cording to Dean Emmons, "We
don't want this to turn into a
popularity contest."
Natural Suspicion
However, Council members are
not totally satisfied with the pres-

ent system, Diamond said. There
is naturally suspicion of any
group that picks its own new mem-
bers.
Punishments are usually an "E"
in the course for the first offense,
and expulsion may be in order for
a second offender.
All cases are subject to a facul-
ty review committee.
Diamond said there were sel-
dom any investigations by the
Council. In his tenure, all but one
offender confessed to his action.
Freshmen are thoroughly indoc-
trinated into the system, Dean
Emmons reported. Upon entrance
they receive a little book entitled
"Honor System," which explains
the program.
"It is a high ideal," the booklet
says. "The Honor System is based
on the . . principle that . . it is

ENDING
TONIGHT

. MICHIGIN

DIAL
NO 2-2513

Dean MARTIN
Si HIS FIRST SOLO STARRING ROL
7f# r/aa4w
JfAM ® S,?

Also
"TOM & JERRY"
In
"The Truce Hurts"

STARTING THURSDAY t
K EM A I...IT'S H E RE AG A IN I
' ar Full of fantasy, fun and delight
Lean
_ 1mr Ti~~ _:

and
Fearless

IL
SE" _.._. ; .}
ONE . ° "-
S4

di.honorable for any man to re-
ceive credit for work which is not
the result of his own efforts." It
is an important principle for men
of the engineering profession, and
part of the code of a gentleman,
the booklet says.
First Freshman Assembly
A member of the Honor Council
appears before the freshmen at
their first assembly and discusses
the system with them. The presi-
dent of the Council also talks to
the faculty.
Dean Emmons said there is no
proof that employers are impressed
negatively or positively by the
system. However, he added, there
is a "steady trickle" of letters from
other schools inquiring about the
program.
A nine student law school com-
mittee appointed by Dean E.
Blythe Stason is now Inquiring
into the possibilities of an honor
system in that college.
State Bars Unaffected
According to Jim Kohler, '59L,
letters to bar associations have
shown they wtuld not be affected
in their choice of candidates for
state exams, by a school's honor
system.
However, they would be nega-
tively influenced toward a violator
of the system. The members of the
various state bars who had gradu-
ated from an honor system school
were unanimously in favor of the
establishment of such a program.
Members of the Literary College
faculty are definitely interested in
an Honor system.
Odegaard Cautious
Dean Charles E. Odegaard of
the Literary College said he had
"no basic disbelief in the system."
However, he cautioned, "No honor
system examination will work un-
less students themselves are pre-
pared to take a moral commit-
ment-each student would be his
brother's keeper."
He emphasized that such a sys-
tem depended on how seriously
students are willing to face such a
responsibility.
Under an Honor system, he said,
the difficult task of handling vio-
lations must fall squarely on the
shoulders of the students, with the
faculty largely relieved of the bur-
den of inflicting discipline.
"This can be rough on students."
Program 'Makes Sense'
Prof. Arthur Carr of the English
department told the Daily that
such a program "makes sense,
and probably ought to be tried."
He didn't think the present sys-
tem was very effective.
Teachers, he explained, feel a
definite sense of embarassment
about proctoring exams, and are
"fairly ineffective."
Students, he thought, would
want an honor system, because un-
der the present set-up their own
interests were not being safe-
guarded.
Exam Re-evaluation
Students should prod the facul-
ty, he continued, if they want
such a program.
He also cited another value of
the system. "Teachers would have
to re-evaluate their examinations."
He felt objective type examina-
tions are overused, adding, teach-
ers would be forced to devise an
exam which could not be easily
cheated.
Right now, he declared, we are
doing things backward. We give

tests which are easily adminis-
tered and corrected in classes of
great size, rather than for their
educational value.
He admitted that at the out-
set, "administrative wheels might
creak a little," but that it could
be no wcrse than our present "un-
satisfactory" situation.
Prof. Palmer A. Throop of the
history department expressed
strong favor for an honor system,
"If I were a student, I'd feel in-
ferior," he said. It would seem
the University assumes I was a
cheat"
He also emphasized values of
the re-evaluation of examinations
which a system must necessarily
bring about. An exam which truly
reveals the abilities of a student
cannot be cheated on, he said.
Dictated Questions
He has dictated the questions
for an exam in advance, and found
grades fell into line in about the
same way as when he didn't.
He thought students should
learn to feel they were trusted.
"Education should not be some-
thing that stops at the end of'
school," he explained.
Stanley Mellon, of the history
department, felt an honor sys-
tem would be a "boon and a bless-
ing" to the faculty.
He said it was humiliating to
play policemen.
Honor at Princeton
Formerly a teaching fellow at
Princeton, where there is an hon-
or system, Mellon said he never
came across a violation.
He, however, underscored the
importance of indoctrination, be-
fore the program. "It must become
a way of life."
At Princeton, he said, students
could take their exams back to
their rooms 'as long as they signed
the pledge.
He told of one example of a stu-
dent who, because of illness, had
inissed an exam given to 350 stu-
dents. He was permitted to take
the same test, if he would sign
the pledge. He took it.
Faculty Indoctrination
This points up, Mellon explain-
ed, the importance of faculty in-
doctrination as well. The system
must be completely trusted.
He didn't believe students would
usually turn in others, because of
cheating. However, he felt there
would be a great deal of social
pressure applied to the cheaters.
Dean Emmons tells a little story
to point up the value of the sys-
tem. Several years ago, he met a
student from some South Ameri-
can country, who had studied in
English Language Institute, be-
fore entering engineering school.
After a week in his new school
he wrote home, "Now I am a man.
People trust me."
Social Work
Institute Set
Several experts in social work
will be featured speakers at the
Sixth Annual Social Work Progress
Institute to be held April 12 in
Ann Arbor.
Sponsored by the School of So-
cial Work, alumni and extension
service, the all-day session will en-
deavor to provide material which
will be helpful to, professionals in
the field and allied lay leaders.
The featured guests will be Dr
Leona Baum gartner, New York
City Commissioner of Health and
Prof. Richard M. Titmuss, of the
University of London Social Ad-
ministration department and au-
thor of several books.
Other guests will be Alan P.
Klein, Professor of Social Group
Work at the University of Pitts-
burgh; Esther Lazarus, director of
the Baltimore Department of Pub-
lic Welfare and Stuart M. Finch,
director of the University's Child-
ren's Psychiatric Hospital.

i - - - --- -

CAR

eny 4
MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES '1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .75 1.87 2.78
3 .90 2.25 3.33
4 1.04 2.60 3.85
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241

C-TED
STANDARD SERVICE

IDREG

t

SERVICE, ACCESSORIES

Friendly service is our busi-
ness. Atlas tires, batteries
and accessories. Warranteed
& guaranteed. See us for
the best price on new tires
-also used tires. Road serv-
ice - mechanic on duty.
Open Mon. through Sat.
7:30 A.M. - 10 P.M.
Sunday 9 A.M. - 8 P.M.

HELP WANTED
STORE
MANAGER
Retail - Men's Wear
College Campus Location
Fast growing chain of quality col-
lege stores seeks the services of an
ambitious, aggressive young man
for new Ann Arbor store, opening
about April 20. Located:
1208 So. University
(New Campus Theatre Bldg.)
Retail clothing experience preferred,
but not absolutely necessary.
WRITE TO
Redwood & Ross, I nc.
Kalamazoo, Michigan
P.O. Box 511
Kalamazoo, Mich.
)x111
WANTED-Cab drivers, full or part-
time. Apply 113 S. Ashley. Ann Arbor
Yellow and Checker Cab Company.
Phone NO 8-9382. )H20
MUSICAL MERCHANDISE,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
RARE VIOLINS
AND BOWS
ALL ACCESSORIES, STRINGS,
REPAIRS
MADDY MUSIC
508 E. Williams
NO 3-3223
)X5
HI FI
Speakers
AR-1, Bozak, Electro-Voice, Lansing
Amplifiers & Tuners
Dyna-Kit, Fisher, McIntosh,
Sherwood, REL
Turntables
Connoisseur, Rek-O-Kut, Garrard
Recorders
Viking, Bell, Berlant, Magnecord, Crown
Pre-Recorded Tapes
Stereophonic, Monaural
Arms
Gray, Electro-Sonic, Fairchild
Audio Supply Laboratories
334 Nickels Arcade

1220 So. University

PERSONAL
TARANTULAS
Kinkajou, alligator lizards, desert
lizards, rare turtles, ant colony,
monkeys, sea horses, tropical fish,
new plants, aquariums and supplies.
UNIVERSITY AQUARIUM
328 East Liberty NO 3-0224
(open daily except Thursday)
)F195
HEY JOE! Get this! All notices and
posters in the Union have been trans-
ferred to the bulletin board on the
wall opposite the snack-bar. )F194
Have two decades passed?
King Tut you're aging fast!
HAPPY BIRTHDAY
___)F19g
FEB. 1958 Graduate wishes to share
apartment with 3 or 4 other girls.
Contact Box 39A, Mich. Daily )F192
ROOM ANDBOARD
PLANNING FOR SUMMER SCHOOL?
Live at Friends Center, an inexpen-
sive women's co-op. Inquire 1416 Hill
St. or phone NO 8-8802. )R20

NO 8-9168
) S59

GARY COOPER
v William Wylers
PRODUCTION
cc-staln g
Dorothy McGuire
as ocstaff i
Marjorie Main
Introducing
ANTHONY
PERKINS /
the most exciting
screen discovery
since James Dean!
Shows at 6:45-9:15

Al"

NOW!
BERGMAN.
"Best Actress
of the Year"

1i

BUSINESS SERVICES

DIAL
__ _ __ _ NO 2-3136

For the Best in
Tires, Batteries, and Service
see
"HOB" GAINSLEY
SERVICE
8o. University & Forest
)849
T I RE SALE
Prices slashed
Big trade-in for used tires
Fully Guaranteed
GOLDEN'S SERVICE
featuring STANDARD Products
601 Packard -- NO 8-9429
ALTERATIONS
DRESSMAKER
Alterations, Restyling
334 S. State St. NO 3-6612
)P4
Dressmaking
Tailoring, restyling. Will do fitting in
your home or mine. Experienced,
minimum charges. NO 5-6370.
Pick-up and Delivery
)P3
DRESSMAKER
Mending - Alterations. Ph. NO 2-9541.
)P1
CONVERT your double-breasted suit to
a new single-breasted model. $15.
Double-breasted, $18, or new silk
shawl collar, $25. Write to Michaels
Tailoring Co., 1425 Broadway, Detroit,
Michigan, for free details or phone
Woodward 3-5776. )P2
REAL ESTATE
BEAUTIFUL WOODED rolling estate
sized lots. $1750 and up. Saline area.
Coury Realty, 61 2 miles west of
Saline on U.S. 112. )R3
THE
BUTTS & SWISHER CO.
REALTORS
FOR ANN ARBOR WOODS
(Washtenaw at Stadium)
Models Open Daily 10-8 )R1
LOST AND FOUND
ARTICLE FOUND at 9:30 performance
of Armstrong concert. )A126
M1XUP of navy polo coats last week.
Mine must be too small for you. Call
NO 2-3843, )A127
LOST:~Black purse in Language~Lab.
Please return glasses. 2031 Stockwell.
)A125
LOST-OMEGA WATCH 3/28 in campus
area. Call NO 2-5284. )A124
REWARD for information leadng to
whereabouts of gold ring. Lost 3/18 in
library. Call 3-0521, ext. 672. If no ans.
leave message. )A120
PHOTOGRAPHIC SUPPLIES
USED LEICA EQUIPMENT
lIc body $60
IIIc with f2 Summitar $149
Leica IIIf body, new.
Regularly $180 - Special $130
THE QUARRY, INC.
320 S. State St. NO 3-1991
more than just a camera shop
)D77

NO 2-7767

NO 2-9425

)X131

INGRID
BERGMANI
GARY
COOPER

Next Attraction.
"HEAVEN KNOWS

Feature 6:55 and 9:20 MR. ALLISON"

Hi Fi Studio
Largest inventory of HI FT components
in the area.
Authorized dealer for:
Dyna-Kit David Bogen
Electro-Voice University
AR-1 Janzen
Rek-O-Kit Garrard
Colloro Fairchild
Pickering Fisher
Jim Lansing McIntosh
Wharfdale and others
Ask about ur payment plans and
pa kage specials.
1217 & 1317 So. University
NO 2-9595 )X3
Bring your electronic service
problems to the
MUSIC CENTER
(30 years experience)
300 S. Thayer NO 8-7200
)X15
PIPE SMOKERS
Nature's sweetest Missouri Meer-
schaum pipes. Selected cobs, rub-
ber bits, aluminum cleaners expert-
ly crafted. Regularly $1.00 each.
Three for $2.50 ppd. Mail check to
Ed. Locke, Lac du Flambeau, Wis-
consin. )B271
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-4 lab coats, size 36, $6; golf
club bag, $2. NO 8-8603 evenings.
)B282
SPANISH WINE SKINS:
Hold % gallon, made in Spain from
goat skin, with Bull Horn nozzle.
Hold any beverage without leaking.
Refreshment on the chair-lift, or on
that warm, white sand. Call NO 5-
5867 at 720 Hill Street. )B283
LIGHTWEIGHT English bicycle. Man's,
3-speed gears, hand-brakes, tire pump,
basket, tool bag; almost new. $40. Call
NO 3-2646, after 5 P.M. )B281
MAN'S BIKE, excellent condition, must
sell. Call Bob Winters, NO 2-3143.
)B280
MID-SEMESTER EXAMS??
Don't be blue
Buy a cake and celebrate-
Easter vacation is overdue!
CAMPBELL & SON BAKERY
219 N. Main NO 8-9880
Order now - we deliver
)B274
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords -- $7.25;
socks, 39c; shorts, 69c; military sup-
plies.
SAM'S STORE
Phone NO 3.0800
122 East Washington )B205
9 x 12 COTTON RUGS
$29.95
Many varieties of colors to choose from
SMITH's FLOOR COVERING'
207 E. Washington
NO 3-5536
Open Monday evening until 8:30
)B279

PASTEL MINK-NEW SKINS
Direct from an, EMBA Ranch.
MARGARET SHOP -516 E. LIBERTY
)J59
WASHINGS-Also Ironing separately.
Specialize in cotton blouses and
washed skirts. Free pick up and deli-
very. Phone NO 2-9020. )J23
TRANSPORTATION
RENT A CLEAN NEW CAR
Daily, Weekly or Hourly Rates
Reservations made anywhere
Rent A Car
514 E. Washington St.
Phone NO 3-4156
SKIING
Riders to Stowe, Vermont
Phone NO 2-7004
)042
PETS & SUPPLIES
MON KEYS
Kinkajou, alligator lizards, desert
lizards, rare turtles, ant colony,
tarantulas, sea horses, tropical fish,
new plants, aquariums and supplies.
UNIVERSITY AQUARIUM
328 East Liberty NO 3-0224
(open daily except Thursday)
)T9
TROPICAL FISHf, Aquarium and sup-
plies, plants, hamsters, guinea pigs,
water lizards, parakeets, canaries and
pet books,
UNIVERSITY AQUARIUM
328 E. Liberty NO 3-0224
Open daily except Thursday
ALL COLORS - baby parakeets and
breeders. Canaries. Baby cockatiei
cages. 305 W. Hoover. NO 2-2403. )T3
FOR RENT
FOR SUMMER ONLY: 4 room newly
furnished and decorated apt! private
bath; 1 block from shopping area and
campus. Cali Jane 3-5974 between
5:30--7 or write Michigan Daily, Box
40-A. )C07
ANN ARBOR'S FINEST
2 male students need congenial
roommate to share ultra-modern
apt. Rent is exceptionally low for
the deluxe living afforded. Phone
D. Lighthammer, NO 2-2556.
)Clo
ROOMMATE WANTED for male Botany
grad., in private, congenial home.
Everything furnished. On-campus lo-
cation. NO 8-7391. )C104
4 ROOMS and bath, unfurnished, avail-
able for 3 or 4 students. Must pay
for all utilities except heat. $90 per
month. NO 8-9874. )Co
FOR FALL and summer--modern apart-
ments 1 block from campus. NO 2-
1443. )C99
USED CARS
SELECT
USED CARS
1953 Pontiac 8 Fordor sedan. Radio and
heater, automatic transmission $645
1953 Ford Custom 8 fordor sedan. Radio
er, and overdrive...........$645
1955 Ford fordor. Radio and heater. Very
clean......................$1065
1951 DeSoto fordor sedan. Clean, good
running car.................$295
KLI NGLER
PONTIAC, Inc.
2500 Jackson
at Stadium Blvd.
Phone NO 2-3221
Open 8:30 A.M. to 8:30 P.M.
)N112
Shop At 4
DOUG'S PLACE
3106 Washtenaw Ave.
(at the sign of Speedway 79)
Several Used 1952 Fords
All Body Styles
from as low as
$295
DOUG GREGORY
World's Smallest Large Volume
FORD DEALER
Deal with Doug -- Doug'l Deal
Phone NO 3-6162 )Nil$
LATE 1951 Chev. Tudor, Powergide, ex-
cellent transportation, one owner;
NO 2-4591, Room 305 Cooley. )N120

Have your car serviced before
that long trip home.
Open until 9 o'clock on
Monday through Friday.
Open until noon on Saturday
Convenient to the campus.

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BROWSING-

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Bob Marshall's

U

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ON

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TWO PERFORMANCES

TODAY
LA BARCA SIN PESCADOR
by
ALEJANDRO CASONA
Today, April 3, 3:15 and 8:00 P.M.

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