100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 08, 1957 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-02-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN IIAILY

FRIDAY,1 EBRUARY 8,1957

TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8,1957

RADUAL ADJUSTMENT:
Desegregation Local Problem-Wolcott

Southern teachers have ex-
pressed themselves as opposed to
desegregation, Prof. Walcott de-
clared, but many are afraid and
are willing to postpone the move-
ment in order to relieve their
fears.
Teachers Volunteer
He noted one instance where
several teachers from a North
Carolina college volunteered to
teach at Duran University, a
North Carolina Negro college.
"It is difficult for these teach-
ers to bring desegregation about
because they have people around
them who throw bombs at any-
one upholding it," Prof. Walcott
asserted.
He cited scapegoating as the
chief reason for segregation, ex-
plaining, "It is natural to take
out our aggressions on somebody
below us in the social and eco-
nomic scale. Much of the desegre-
gation obstruction comes from the
poor whites who would be deprived
of a scapegoat if desegregation
were permitted."
Prof. Walcott said the southern
people will have to learn that life
goes on no matter what the situa-
tion. He asserted the southerners
are anticipating evils that will
not occur..
"The southern people are find-
ing this out in economic ways,"
Prof. Walcott declared. "They are
finding it costly to transport three
or four Negroes from one district
to another."
Supreme Court
Prof. Walcott commended the
Supreme Court ruling for its "tre-
mendous" impact on integration.
He pointed 'to the segregation of
bus lines and local laws and or-
dinanees supporting segregation
that are being declared illegal by
federal ruling.

'Bureau
Helps Find
Grad Jobs
Every year the University's
Bureau of Appointments receives
many more Job requests for grad-
uate students than it can fill, ac-
cording to Prof. Glenn Ludlow,
Director of the Bureau of Appoint-
ments.
The Bureau has contacted more
than 300 college presidents in-
viting them to fill their faculty
Job openings with Michigan grad-
uates through the Bureau.
"Just as there is a pressing need
for teachers at the secondary
levels there is also a great need
for college instructors," Prof. Lud-
low said.
The Bureau especially needs
science and mathematics gradu-
ate applications but there are
openings in all fields according
to the "director.
The Director and Assistant Dir-
ector of the appointments Bureau
are slated to attend three confer-
ences in February and early April.
"We would like to have many more
requests for placement from grad
students when we go to these con-
ferences. I always get more re-
quests from colleges for teaching
personnel than the office can fill.
Our biggest problem is in getting
grads to register for placement,"
Prof. Ludlow reported.
Rackham Exhibits
Work of Faculty
Six new members of the faculty
of the architecture college are
represented in an exhibition of
paintings, drawings, lithographs
an dsculpture in the mezzanine
galleries at Rackham.
The exhibition will continue
through Feb. 18.

4s

T

t

--Daily-Norm Jacobs
DESEGREGATION PROBLEM-Prof. Fred G. Wolcott, of the
school of education, discusses adjustments being made to the
differing problems of desegregation in various regions of the
country.'

By DIANE LABAKAS

Desegregation in the South is
a regional matter Prof. Fr'ed G.
Wolcott of the School of Educa-
tion said recently.
Prof. Walcott, who has done
much research on the desegrega-
tion problem, said certain regions'
in the South would accept de-
segregation sooner than other
areas.
"Where there is a region domi-
nated by Negrdes, desegregation.
will be slower," Prof. Walcott de-
Glared. "Some regions are ready
to accept desegregation now. Oth-
ers will take up 'to 20 years."
Nideast Lecture
To Be Reviewed
Questions and suggestions which
arose during Wednesday evening's
"Town Talk" will be discussed on
three Ann Arbor radio stations
over the weekend.
Featuring Prof. Marshall Knap-
pen of the political science de-
partment, the questions will be
those raised by the audience aft-
er Prof. N. Marbury Efimenco's
Wednesday lecture on "What
should the United States do in the
Middle East?>"
Radio time will be given at 1
p.m. today over University FM;
station WUOM, 5:30 p.m. today
over WPAG and 8 p.m. Sunday
over WHRV.

Prof. Walcott noted that somre
southern states have started de-
segregating schools at the college
level and then intend to gradually
work, down to the secondary and
elementary levels,
"This is a smart move," Prof.
Walcott asserted, "because resent-
ment is least on the college scale
because on the lower educational
levels ignorance is more preval-
ent."
HIe said education is contribut-
ing to desegregation by infprming
people about the problem and
preparing them for the impact
when it occurs.

Walter A. Paulson, honor student at Pratt Institute, Brooklyn,
and member of the honorary engineering fraternity, Tau Beta Pi,
expects to receive his B.S. in Chemical Engineering in June 1957.
He is interested in the professional advantages that a student may
derive from technical experience obtained during summer work.
In addition to the Formal Technical Training Program,
we frequently have a number of vacation replacement
jobs and other temporary positions which are available
to college students.
Last summer we hired a total of 720 students from 171
different colleges and universities. Most of these were
juniors, or were graduate students about one year away
from permanent employment.
You can see our program is a fairly substantial one,
Walt.

7

U1

- ---- -- --- - ---- a - -- - - --a '.- - - - - -
I I
FREE DRY CLEANING FREE I
I I
' __________ _________>
A SKIRT A Pairof_
I I E
wihay aysTROUSERS
th any Lady'swith any Man's !
Suit, Coat or Dress Suit or Coat
SUN 1-HOUR CLEANING /
4th and Washington I
I I
I GOOD ONLY WITH THIS COUPON GOOD UNTIl. FEB. 23 i
r ""

Robert G. Carter received his M.S. in industrial engineering
from Ohio State in 1951 and joined Du Pont soon afterward.
After varied plant experience, he recently undertook an inter-
esting new assignment in the Polychemicals Department at
Du Pont's Sabine River Works, Orange, Texas. The major func-
tion of his current work is to coordinate cost information as an
aid in maintaining cost control.
oU bet we do, Walt They're part of a regular Tech-
Inical Training Program which Du Pont has had for
years.
Ordinarily we try to assign summer employees to work
which ties in with their fields of training in college and
with their long-range interests. Informal or formal instruc-
tion on Company matters is usually provided.
We're definitely in favor of these summer contacts, for
they provide students with practical technical experience
and make them more valuable to industry when they
graduate. And it gives us a chance to become better
acquainted, too, with some of the mentwe'll be consider-
ing for permanent employment, later. It's a program of
mutual benefit.

e
E

FRE FILM: "Mechanical Engineering at Du Pont"
available on loan for showing before student groups
and clubs. Write to the Du Pont Company, Wilming-
ton, Delaware.
BETTER THINGS FOR BETTER LI[VNG...THROUGH CHEMISTRY
Watch "Du Pont Theater" on television

i

1

- -

'4

. r- - - --..

-.

-

w

^,
I4.

C

FE

T

TI

lam

N

Jq

rp

'U

I

ANTS

f

Our shelves are stocked with

E

FlUSED
for Every Course in Every Department
ENGINEERS - MEDICS -LAWYERS

I

4

Er
I

f

Make use of our years of experience in bookselling to ensure yourself the Best Buy in Town.

TO THE FRESHMAN

Make Wahr's your headquarters! Save time and confusion
by buying your Books and Supplies from us during orienta-
tion week. Our aim is to serve you better.

STUDENT
SUPPL IES
of ALL KINDS

TO THE RETURNING STUDENT
The same courteous, well-trained staff is on hand to aid
you in getting outfitted for the school year. Do not hesitate
'to call on us to serve you in every way.

Fountain Pens - Pencils - Drawing Sets - Zipper Notebooks - Leather Goods - Stationery - Slide Rules - Art Supplies
A SQUARE DEAL FOR THE STUDENT ALWAYS
" " " at " " .

® - a

.

r

I w ® ® a ® ' a - - n

',

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan